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The Architectural Imaginary

Posted By Anna S. House, Thursday, April 28, 2016
Updated: Monday, May 23, 2016

In a letter of 1759, Francesco Algarotti famously defined the architectural capriccio as the painter “choosing a real place, then filling it with beautiful buildings, either taken from here and there, or simply invented.”  Yet this kind of fanciful invention was hardly new; phenomena as diverse as pilgrimage, recreational tourism, archaeological excavation, public ritual, and new methods of perspective, printmaking, and cartography inspired early modern artists to reimagine both individual buildings and the city itself.  Proposals are invited for presentations on imaginary architecture and city views in the early modern period in Europe, defining “imaginary” as anything not corresponding to an actual built environment.  Topics might include, but are not limited to:

 

-       imagining the holy city or the utopian city

-       “armchair” travel through print, including text and/or image

-       imaginative re-combinations of existing monuments or buildings

-       the festive city remade through temporary architecture and theatrical apparatus

 

Interdisciplinary and cross-cultural topics are encouraged.  Please submit proposals—including paper title, brief abstract (150-word maximum), keywords, and a brief CV—to Dr. Anna Swartwood House [houseas@mailbox.sc.edu] by May 26, 2016.  [note deadline extension]

 

Tags:  architecture  Art History  cities  cross-cultural  engraving  festival  painting  utopia 

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