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Exploring Disabilities in Early Modern Italy

Posted By Julia A. DeLancey, Wednesday, May 11, 2016
Updated: Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Exploring Disabilities in Early Modern Italy      

This session is sponsored by the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at St. Louis University.

Scholars studying geographic areas such as England, Flanders, and Germany have focused consistently and significantly on questions related to disabilities and their impact on cultural production.  Until recently, similar topics have received less attention in scholarship on the Italian peninsula, although recent works have opened new avenues.  This session seeks to bring together papers by scholars focusing on questions related to disabilities in Italy from c. 1300 – c. 1700.  We are particularly interested in papers which explore topics related to mental illnesses, and to papers which consider examples from early modern visual culture.  Submitted abstracts should also clarify the ways in which the paper will engage with social rather than medical models of disability.

Organizers:        Sara van den Berg (St. Louis University):  vandens@slu.edu;  Julia A. DeLancey (Truman State University):  delancey@truman.edu

To submit a paper for consideration for this session, please send a Word or PDF document, by e-mail, to both session organizers no later than 1 June 2016.  Please ensure that the document includes the following information (which will be required for accepted papers for submission to RSA):

presenter’s first, middle, and last name; academic affiliation and title (or “Independent Scholar”);  e-mail address;  paper title (15-word maximum); abstract (150-word maximum); identification of relevant discipline as per RSA (Art History, History, Literature, or Other);  short curriculum vita (300-word maximum--may be submitted as a separate document)

 

Tags:  Art History  body  cultural history  disability  History  interdisciplinary  Italy  Literature  material culture 

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