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CFP Worlding the Early Modern: Case Studies in Visual and Material Culture

Posted By Ivana Vranic, Tuesday, May 2, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Initiated by the Making Worlds Project, which investigates recent questions posed by the global turn in the humanities (including art history, literature, anthropology and history), this panel seeks papers that engage with the representational and conceptual ways in which the world was conceived, imagined and inscribed between the fifteenth and seventeenth centuries. Through representing, collecting, utopian writing, map-making, trading, encountering and describing the world, early modern artists, traders, writers and natural philosophers were in fact bringing the world nearer to them. Taking cue from Martin Heidegger’s concept of worlding as an ontological process of bringing-near—or thinging—the world, which is always both pre-existing and historically contingent, we are interested in gaining a more nuanced understanding of what the world meant epistemologically, philosophically, geographically, technologically and cosmologically in the longue durée of the early modern period. In particular, we want to explore how things, such as objects, texts, and works of artistic and visual culture, mediated and participated in world-making.

 

We invite papers that take up different case studies which engage with material and visual representations of the world, including those that attend to how and why in its making such conceptualizations were either totalizing, flawed, or even impossible. Please send your 150-word abstracts, with a title, keywords, and a 300-word CV to Tomasz Grusiecki (tomasz.grusiecki@mail.mcgill.ca) and Ivana Vranic (ivana7vranic@gmail.com) by May 30, 2017. 

 

Tags:  Art  Art History  cartography  Continents  Counter-Reformation  drawings  Early Modernity  Geography  Historiography  image and text  materiality  painting  portraiture  print culture  representation  sculpture  the global turn  Travel Accounts  Visual Culture 

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