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Art History CFPs for RSA 2018 New Orleans
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CFP: Saints and Angels: Representing Human and Non-Human Exemplars of Devotion

Posted By Kelly Whitford, Thursday, May 4, 2017
Updated: Thursday, May 4, 2017
Haloed saints and winged angels appear in every medium and style of early modern sacred art and the phrase “saints and angels” appears repeatedly in devotional texts, religious treatises, and prayer books of the era. But while both saints and angels were held up as sanctified exemplars of devotion and were prayed to as intercessory figures, they were considered fundamentally different in their natures. While saints were humans revered for their pious lives and (often) deaths, angels were thought to be incorporeal spirits composed of nothing and created by God. While one is human, the other is spirit, but both were considered holy paradigms.

 

Papers are invited that examine this delicate line between saints and angels in the early modern era and how the relationship between the two was represented, defined, confused, blurred, or worked out in early modern art.


Papers from all geographic areas are welcome.

 

Please submit proposals for 20-minute papers to the organizer Kelly Whitford (kelly_whitford@brown.edu) by 31 May 2017 with the subject line "RSA Saint and Angels." Please include:

  • paper title
  • abstract (150 word maximum)
  • keywords
  • brief curriculum vitae (300 word maximum)

Tags:  Angels  architecture  art  art history  Baroque  body  corporeality  devotion  early modern  Holy  Human  incorporeality  Non-human  painting  print  Renaissance  Saints  sculpture  Spirit  visions 

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