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Art History CFPs for RSA 2018 New Orleans
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This blog is for CFPs for sessions in art history for RSA 2018 New Orleans. Members may post CFPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CFP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CFP. Make sure the CFP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email to post a CFP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CFP to submit a paper proposal. CFPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CFPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.


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Top tags: Art history  early modern  Art  Renaissance  Italy  materiality  Historiography  sculpture  architecture  body  devotion  Early Modernity  image and text  New Approaches  painting  Netherlandish  patronage  Artistic practice  Baroque  senses  sensory experience  technologies  Visual Culture  Americas  antiquarianism  artistic process  Book History  fashion  Geography  History of Science 

Particularities of Place: Collecting Early Modern European Art in the Southern United States

Posted By Alexis R. Culotta, Wednesday, May 24, 2017


Particularities of Place: Collecting Early Modern European Art in the Southern United States 


The history of early modern European art collections in the American south offers a complex yet compelling narrative. In the spirit of this year's host city of New Orleans, this session aims to examine the history of early modern holdings across the southern United States and the extent to which cultural and/or sociological connections informed the development of these collections.


This session invites submissions from all art historical and museological disciplines on any form of artistic production dating to the early modern era (roughly 1400-1750) provided it bears connection the general geographic footprint of the southern United States. Paper topics can range from individual art work case studies to larger surveys, and those that look to the driving forces behind these collections – such as collector's or curator's personalities; finding a place in history; or a passion for education – are particularly encouraged. 


Please send an abstract of 150 words, a one-page CV, and contact information by email attachment to Alexis Culotta ( and Vanessa Schmid ( no later than 3 June 2017. 

Tags:  Art  Art history  Baroque  collecting culture  construction  early modern  Netherlandish  reception  Renaissance  Spanish and Italian Renaissance  Visual Culture 

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CFP: Saints and Angels: Representing Human and Non-Human Exemplars of Devotion

Posted By Kelly Whitford, Thursday, May 4, 2017
Updated: Thursday, May 4, 2017
Haloed saints and winged angels appear in every medium and style of early modern sacred art and the phrase “saints and angels” appears repeatedly in devotional texts, religious treatises, and prayer books of the era. But while both saints and angels were held up as sanctified exemplars of devotion and were prayed to as intercessory figures, they were considered fundamentally different in their natures. While saints were humans revered for their pious lives and (often) deaths, angels were thought to be incorporeal spirits composed of nothing and created by God. While one is human, the other is spirit, but both were considered holy paradigms.


Papers are invited that examine this delicate line between saints and angels in the early modern era and how the relationship between the two was represented, defined, confused, blurred, or worked out in early modern art.

Papers from all geographic areas are welcome.


Please submit proposals for 20-minute papers to the organizer Kelly Whitford ( by 31 May 2017 with the subject line "RSA Saint and Angels." Please include:

  • paper title
  • abstract (150 word maximum)
  • keywords
  • brief curriculum vitae (300 word maximum)

Tags:  Angels  architecture  art  art history  Baroque  body  corporeality  devotion  early modern  Holy  Human  incorporeality  Non-human  painting  print  Renaissance  Saints  sculpture  Spirit  visions 

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New Approaches to the Art of Spanish Naples

Posted By Jesse Locker, Sunday, April 23, 2017

Long overshadowed by Florence, Rome, Venice, and Bologna, in recent years, scholars have come to recognize that Naples—the largest city in early modern Italy—was a vibrant crossroads of cultural exchange that attracted artists, patrons, collectors, and connoisseurs from Madrid, Valencia, Palermo, Genoa, and Antwerp. However, scholarship on Neapolitan art still lags behind that of other Italian capitals, often bogged down by thorny issues of attribution, documentation, and chronology. This session aims to explore the artistic and architectural heritage of the city in light of its position as an international capital, situated between the Papal States and the broader Hispanic and Mediterranean worlds. New methodologies, innovative approaches to old problems, and interdisciplinary perspectives on Neapolitan art are especially encouraged.

Proposals for a 20-minute paper should include a preliminary title, an abstract of 150 words, a very brief curriculum vitae (300 words maximum), and keywords. Please send to Jesse Locker,, by Monday, May 22, 2017.

Tags:  Art History  Baroque  Early Modern  Italy  Naples  Renaissance 

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The Problem and Promise of the Baroque: New Approaches in Research, Historiography, and Pedagogy

Posted By Rachel Miller, Monday, April 10, 2017

In the 2011 book, Rethinking Baroque, editor Helen Hills and the contributing authors proposed to both interrogate and re-energize the study of the baroque, a much-maligned concept and one Hills termed the “grit in the oyster of art history.”  The authors sought to come to grips with the term from a wide array of chronological and methodological approaches, problematizing and reshaping the landscape of inquiry.  By contrast, the following year Gauvin Bailey’s Baroque and Rococo re-entrenched the Baroque as a category for study, seeing it as a moment of unified global exuberance.  More than five years later, however, it is unclear where these two divergent approaches have left researchers and teachers. In what ways is the Baroque continuing to be critically reevaluated and used as an interpretive tool? Where does the study of Baroque art currently stand and where is it going, especially in relation to the rising emphasis on the “Early Modern”? What is at stake in surrendering the Baroque in favor of modernity? Hills herself asked “Can the apparent contradictions between periodization and critical strategy be reconciled?” In this panel, we seek to engage with and extend these questions.

This session will examine the utility of the ‘Baroque’ in several different ways.  First, we are interested in historical case studies of objects, spaces, and experiences that engage with or challenge the Baroque style in new and exciting ways. We are open to research that argues for the preservation of the term as a site of legitimate scholarly discourse or provides a compelling argument to reject it.  Second, we seek approaches that deal with the historiography of the Baroque, but also with the state of the field, critically interrogating the risks and benefits of how we discuss periodization and the problems inherent in a linear approach to art historical inquiry.  Third, we seek to include papers that address what is at stake pedagogically when dealing with the period 1580-1730. How do educators approach the paradox of the Baroque at a time when the term itself has been challenged and reassessed in ways that are not often reflected in standard undergraduate course offerings and textbooks? How do we leverage these complex discussions into more fruitful classroom discourse?  Papers need not deal with all three prongs of inquiry though crossover is encouraged.

Please submit your paper proposal by May 15 to Saskia Beranek ( and Rachel Miller ( Proposals must include the following:

·      Name, affiliation, email address

·      Paper title

·      Abstract (250-word maximum)

·      Keywords

·      CV (1 page)

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Tags:  Art History  Baroque  Case Studies  Historiography  New Approaches  Pedagogy 

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