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Art History CFPs for RSA 2018 New Orleans
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This blog is for CFPs for sessions in art history for RSA 2018 New Orleans. Members may post CFPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CFP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CFP. Make sure the CFP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email to post a CFP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CFP to submit a paper proposal. CFPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CFPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.


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CFP Worlding the Early Modern: Case Studies in Visual and Material Culture

Posted By Ivana Vranic, Tuesday, May 2, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Initiated by the Making Worlds Project, which investigates recent questions posed by the global turn in the humanities (including art history, literature, anthropology and history), this panel seeks papers that engage with the representational and conceptual ways in which the world was conceived, imagined and inscribed between the fifteenth and seventeenth centuries. Through representing, collecting, utopian writing, map-making, trading, encountering and describing the world, early modern artists, traders, writers and natural philosophers were in fact bringing the world nearer to them. Taking cue from Martin Heidegger’s concept of worlding as an ontological process of bringing-near—or thinging—the world, which is always both pre-existing and historically contingent, we are interested in gaining a more nuanced understanding of what the world meant epistemologically, philosophically, geographically, technologically and cosmologically in the longue durée of the early modern period. In particular, we want to explore how things, such as objects, texts, and works of artistic and visual culture, mediated and participated in world-making.


We invite papers that take up different case studies which engage with material and visual representations of the world, including those that attend to how and why in its making such conceptualizations were either totalizing, flawed, or even impossible. Please send your 150-word abstracts, with a title, keywords, and a 300-word CV to Tomasz Grusiecki ( and Ivana Vranic ( by May 30, 2017. 


Tags:  Art  Art History  cartography  Continents  Counter-Reformation  drawings  Early Modernity  Geography  Historiography  image and text  materiality  painting  portraiture  print culture  representation  sculpture  the global turn  Travel Accounts  Visual Culture 

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Representations of the Continents in the Early Modern World

Posted By Louise Arizzoli, Saturday, April 29, 2017

European artists and writers visualized the known world through personifications holding attributes related to each continent. After its discovery, America was added to the figures of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Allegories developed, reviving the Greek habit to depict abstract concepts in the human form. During the sixteenth century, continent personifications started to appear in pageants, atlases and prints, and became a very popular iconographical motif throughout Europe in all artistic media. These figures clearly show the way Europeans perceived the rest of the world - often characterized as a stereotypical Other – and were generally designed to express Europe’s belief of its own superiority, as well as its quest for a newer global identity.

We are welcoming papers for a session at the Renaissance Society of America, New Orleans, 22- 24 March 2018, dealing broadly with visual, literary and cartographical representations of the continents in the early modern world, from different regions of Europe. We would also welcome presentations on ancient and medieval sources for the continents’ iconography--the themes of Europa and the Bull, Africa with elephant tusk headdress, Asia with incense burner, and the Adoration of the Magi; transformations in America from cannibalistic to civilized; personification of cities and rivers, as well as travel accounts, early modern maps, and literary descriptions of the known and unknown continents. We would also welcome papers dealing with non-western perspectives – artistic or cartographical – on Europe. This call for papers would like to expand on the sessions of RSA held in Chicago 2017.

Please send proposals to Louise Arizzoli ( and Maryanne Horowitz ( Include in your proposal: name and affiliation, paper title (max. 15 words), abstract (max. 150 words), and a brief CV (max. 300 words; in ordinary CV format).

Email proposals as soon as possible, but no later than May 25, 2017.

Applicants will hear whether paper proposal fits in this group submission by 4 June, for the RSA submission deadline of 7 June 2017.


Tags:  Allegory  Art History  Continents  Geography  Travel Accounts 

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Sacred Geography

Posted By Jessica Weiss, Monday, April 24, 2017

Papers are invited for a session on sacred space at the Renaissance Society of America meeting in New Orleans from March 22-24, 2018. References to space and place abound during the Early Modern era, alongside changing ideas about theology and global geography. This session poses the questions: How did ideas about location, broadly defined, interact or intersect with notions of the sacred during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries? What can references, descriptions, depictions, or evocations of place through texts, images, and materials reveal about devotional ideas, practices, theological constructs, or belief systems? All papers related to place/space and spirituality will be considered, and proposals that push the boundaries of these categories are especially welcome.

Proposals for 20-minute papers should be sent to Jessica Weiss ( by May 25th and should include the author’s name, professional affiliation, and contact information; the paper title (15-word maximum); a brief abstract (150-word maximum); and a brief CV (300-word maximum).

Tags:  Devotion  Geography  Materiality  Religion  Space  Spirituality  Visual Culture 

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