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History CFPs for RSA 2018 New Orleans
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This blog is for CFPs for sessions in history for RSA 2018 New Orleans. Members may post CFPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CFP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CFP. Make sure the CFP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CFP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CFP to submit a paper proposal. CFPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CFPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Gaming and Gambling: Time, Space, Material Culture

Posted By Karen-edis Barzman, Sunday, April 23, 2017

Gaming and Gambling: Time, Space, Material Culture 

This CfP invites papers on the material culture of gaming and gambling (playing cards, dice, board games, etc.) and the impact of new media and markets on ludic practices, including the press and print markets. Also welcome are papers on the impact of this kind of adult play on the spatial dimensions and temporal rhythms of social life – from court life to tavern life and from time stolen or diverted in everyday practices in residential quarters and work spaces to “other” spaces regulated by the state (e.g., the Venetian ridotti) or the informal economy of the street (below the state’s threshold of vision). The focus may include homosocial practices of play or games intended to engender and shore up feminine virtue as well as mixed-gender times and spaces in which leisure and labor were elided in transactions involving gaming paraphernalia and the wager. Geographic focus is unrestricted; temporal limits, c. 1300-1700.

Submissions Guidelines                                    
Proposals should be for 20-minute papers and should include

  • a preliminary title for the paper
  • an abstract of 150 words
  • a 1-page CV, including current institutional affiliation(s)
  • current contact information

Submit your proposal to kbarzman@binghamton.edu by Wednesday, May 31, 2017. Subject line: “RSA – Gaming and Gambling.”

Tags:  board games  cards  dice  feminine  gambling  gaming  homosocial  labor  leisure  ludic  press  print  ridotti  space  state  street  time  virtue  wager 

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Gender and Early Modern Cartography

Posted By Camille Serchuk, Friday, April 21, 2017

How might attention to gender illuminate not only the allegorical margins, but also the production, patronage and consumption of early modern cartography?

This session welcomes papers that investigate the intersections of cartography and gender in pictorial and textual form. Some questions that might be considered include: how did early modern notions of gender inform the iconography of the continents or the depiction of their inhabitants? How are we to understand the role of gender in anthropomorphic/gynomorphic maps? How might research into gendered spaces frame our understanding of cartographic display or spatial measurement? In the interplay of reader and text, how does gender animate cartographic literature? How do cartographic inscriptions define consumers and the consumption of cartography? Was gender a factor in cartographic production? How might gender have shaped the patronage of cartography by Elizabeth I and Catherine de’Medici? Especially welcome are papers that bring new images/objects/texts to light, or that offer new approaches to familiar ones.

Deadline for abstracts is Monday, May 22nd, 2017. Please submit your paper’s title, an abstract of no more than 150 words, keywords, and a very brief CV (300 words, max), with contact information to Camille Serchuk (serchukc1@southernct.edu).

Tags:  cartography  femininity  gender  geography  mapping  maps  masculinity 

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Idealized Woman, Real Women: A Complex Comparison

Posted By Elena Brizio, Thursday, April 20, 2017

 

In  medieval and Renaissance literature women were idealized according to a strict model of female virtue based on a culture of honor and chastity that was reflected in art as well as in law and daily life. The question that then arises is: how were these idealized women perceived by real women of that time? Did they view them as attainable models or did they strive to accomplish a balance between real and ideal? 

The aim of this session will be to examine local and/or regional examples of both idealized and real women and to compare, where possible, the theory and practice. Papers might focus on (but are not limited to) the following aspects of this comparison across the early modern world from 1400-1700 CE:

- Iconographic representations of idealized women versus their choices as art patrons.

- Idealized women in literature and theatre versus personal representation of the self.

- Sumptuary laws and their importance in 'making or breaking' the image of a woman.

- Manipulation of rules, accommodation of conflicts, social negotiation.

- Daily comparison: mothers versus step-mothers, wives versus widows, lay women versus nuns.

- Personal practices of piety as opposed to the official trend imposed by the church.

Please send a 1-page curriculum vitae, a title and a 150-word abstract of the proposed presentation to Elena Brizio (eb893@georgetown.edu). 

All presenters must make their own travel arrangements.

The deadline for the submission of abstracts is 24 May 2017.  Subject line: "RSA - Idealized Woman, Real Women"  

 

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Cartography and the Early Modern Archive

Posted By Karen-edis Barzman, Sunday, April 16, 2017
Updated: Sunday, April 16, 2017

The investment of sovereignties in mapping for the storage and delivery of geospatial information dates to the fifteenth century, when the Republic of Venice called for “true” representations of fortresses, towns, and contested borderlands in its territories (1460). While the intention was to be systematic, in Venice as elsewhere the development of a comprehensive cartographic archive was slow and uneven. This CfP invites submissions addressing the instrumental use of mapping in the management of the early modern state, with a focus on hand-drawn maps (from sketches to highly finished drawings with watercolor, silver, and gold leaf) intended for circulation in the inner chambers of administration. Also of interest are three-dimensional models of territory or maps in relief. Topics may include techniques for the collection of data and mapping itself although primary interest is in the accommodation of maps in the archive, their relation to archival documents in text, their evolving modalities of representation as instruments of statecraft, the new forms of literacy they demanded, their end-users, and their employment in policy-making, urban planning, empire-building, waging war, diplomacy, and maintenance peace. Geographic focus is unrestricted; temporal limits, c. 1300-1700.

Submissions Guidelines                                    
Proposals should be for 20-minute papers and should include

  • a preliminary title for the paper
  • an abstract of 150 words
  • a 1-page CV, including current institutional affiliation(s)
  • current contact information

Submit your proposal to kbarzman@binghamton.edu by Wednesday, May 31, 2017. Subject line: “RSA – Cartography and the Early Modern Archive.”

 

Tags:  archive  borderlands  cartography  diplomacy  documents  drawings  fortress  geospatial information  maps  peace  policy-making  sketches  state administration  territories  town  war. 

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Technologies of War

Posted By Karen-edis Barzman, Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Papers may take a literal or figurative approach to “technologies of war.” Topics may include the machinery or mechanics of weaponry as well as the training and management of troops, from conscription and deployment to armed conflict, collection of booty, and returning in victory or defeat. Work is welcome on maritime infrastructures and modalities of war as well as war on land, including the military encampment in its material and spatial dimensions and the social relations peculiar to the logic that informed its late medieval and early modern instantiations. Also of interest are the discursive and/or embodied practices that constituted opposing forces as subaltern and inimical, from rallying songs to the subjection of prisoners and the mutilation of the bodies of fallen adversaries. Geographic focus is unrestricted; temporal limits, c. 1300-1700.

Submissions Guidelines                                    
Proposals should be for 20-minute papers and should include

  • a preliminary title for the paper
  • an abstract of 150 words
  • a 1-page CV, including current institutional affiliation(s)
  • current contact information

Submit your proposal to kbarzman@binghamton.edu by Wednesday, May 31, 2017.

Tags:  adversaries  arms  booty  conflict  conscription  deployment  encampment  enemy  machinery  maritime  material  prisoners  spatial  technologies  training  troops  war  weaponry 

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Spaces of Making and Thinking

Posted By Tianna H. Uchacz, Sunday, April 9, 2017

In the early modern period, conventional spaces enabled and limited a wide range of enterprises that required processes of thinking and making, including religious reflection, political theorizing, military engineering, medicinal intervention, scientific inquiry, literary composition, musical performance, artisanal production, business practices, and household management. Scholars have recently been revisiting these activities to consider the overlap between the processes of making and thinking in contradistinction to a prevailing historiographical emphasis on their strict separation. The series of panels proposed here seeks to build on such work by asking how early modern conceptions of space and place could allow for the interconnectedness of head and hand, or mind and body, in productions of all kinds. What activities did early modern spaces afford? How did spatial structure, atmosphere and environment, decoration, or location shape occupants and their practices in the studiolo, the forge, the workshop, the academy, the kitchen, the cloister, the council chamber, the home, the field, the ship, etc.? Could conventional spaces be redefined and adapted to accommodate changing activities, or were new kinds of spaces necessary?

 

With the sponsorship of the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies (CRRS), we welcome proposals for papers to be presented as part of a series of panels on the theme of “Spaces of Making and Thinking” at the Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting in 2018 (New Orleans). For a more detailed description of the sessions, please see the full CFP on the CRRS website or download the PDF in attachment below.


Please send paper proposals to Colin Murray (colin.murray@utoronto.ca) and Tianna Uchacz (thu2102@columbia.edubefore 1 May 2017. All proposals must include a paper title (15 words max), an abstract (150 words max, see guidelines here), keywords, a brief cv (300 words max, NOT in prose form, see guidelines here), and any a/v needs. Please include your first, middle, and last name as well as your affiliation in your email.

Download File (PDF)

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Papal Kin: Politics, Patronage, and Social Mobility

Posted By RSA, Thursday, April 6, 2017

“Papal Kin: Politics, Patronage, and Social Mobility”
Call For Papers – Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting 2018
New Orleans, LA, USA
22–24 March 2018

A central paradox of the early modern papacy was the expectation that on his elevation the pope abandoned ties to his natal kin, yet also would incorporate many relatives into his administration. This paradox underpinned much of the criticism of the early modern papacy and to modern society has become one of its most recognizable characteristics. This series of panels explores the mechanisms by which papal kin assisted or benefited from their relative’s office and hopes to sponsor comparative discussions about the strategies and experiences of papal kin.

This Call For Papers is open to scholarly research focusing on any of the many aspects of how the early modern papacy incorporated papal natal or adopted kin into administrative, patronage, artistic or social circles. Presentations could focus on the following aspects of this practice across the early modern world from 1400-1700 CE:

  • How did co-operative kinship networks function?
  • Cardinal-nephews and/or the emergence of the office of secretary of state
  • Negotiating parentado and marital alliances for papal kin
  • The role of female relatives, both natal and marital kin
  • Patronage dynamics as an expression of loyalty
  • The roles of lay versus clerical kin
  • Public versus private relationships
  • The visualization of kinship ties in art, architecture, literature, and ritual
  • Nepotism and its critics

Please send a half-page curriculum vitae, a title and a 250-word abstract of the proposed presentation to Jennifer Mara DeSilva (jmdesilva@bsu.edu). In addition, please detail any A/V requirements that you might have. All presenters must become members of the Renaissance Society of America, be committed to attending the conference in New Orleans, and make their own travel arrangements. For more information about the RSA, please see the conference website.

The deadline for the submission of abstracts is 31 May 2017.

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