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History CFPs for RSA 2018 New Orleans
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This blog is for CFPs for sessions in history for RSA 2018 New Orleans. Members may post CFPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CFP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CFP. Make sure the CFP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CFP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CFP to submit a paper proposal. CFPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CFPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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CFP: ELEMENTAL FORCE

Posted By Thalia E. Allington-Wood, Thursday, May 4, 2017
Drowning, falling, floating, growing, burning, melting. How are elements figured in Renaissance and early modern artistic representation? From imagery of earth, water, air and fire, to the more ubiquitous sense of temperature, weight, darkness and light, how does visual culture contribute to an understanding of the elements in this period? From the thrusting up of rocks from beneath the earth through volcanoes and earthquakes, to the wide expanse of the cosmos, knowledge of natural phenomena was prominent in the Renaissance and early modern imagination. How do objects harness the elements in their production? What, for example, is the role of fire and earth in metal works and ceramics? Equally, how did elemental forces act upon and alter works of art – from physical damage to the influence of regional topographies, materials and pigments?

The landscape of elemental physics changed dramatically between 1300 and 1700. This history is characterised by a broad paradigm shift from a sublunar, terrestrial world made up of the four elements and their specific material attributes (hot, cold, heavy, light), to a globe experienced through Mercator’s seas, Galileo’s sky and Newton’s earth. Yet the elements, their effects upon the body, their power to manifest material things – and how they are imagined and contested in visual culture – do not always sit easily within this chronology. The representation of these forces is the focus of this panel. It is a subject that has the power to open up broader concerns regarding memory, motion, travel, sensory experience, metamorphosis, environmentalism and networks of knowledge exchange – social, cultural and political.

We welcome papers from across disciplines, from within Europe and beyond Western contexts. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

- The elements and their early modern properties: Earth/ Rock, Water, Air, Fire; hot, cold, wet, dry, heavy, light.
- Elements as complex, compound mixtures.
- Materiality & Making: sculpture and stone, ceramics and glass, metal and fire, water and fountains, earth and pigments.
- Elemental/ material states: solid, liquid and in-between.
- The effects of the elements upon the body: falling, burning, pain, joy, drowning, disease, phenomenological and sensory approaches to elemental force.
- Understanding within academic disciplines: natural philosophy, alchemy, chemistry, theories of metamorphosis.
- Cosmos: stars, sky, separation of celestial and terrestrial physics.
- Gravity.
- Light & Shadow.
- Manifestations of the elements in nature: wind, clouds, volcanoes, rivers, the sea, mountains, natural disasters such as earthquakes, floods, storms.
- Connections to landscape, geography, environmentalism, catastrophism, the non-human.
- Water & Travel: wetscapes, navigation and shipwreck, hydrographies.

Please send a paper title, abstract (150 word maximum), keywords, and a brief curriculum vitae (300 word maximum – see RSA guidelines for requirements) to thalia.allington-wood@ucl.ac.uk and sophie.morris@ucl.ac.uk by 31 May 2017

Tags:  Air  artistic process  bodies  early modern  Earth  Elements  Fire  Materiality  natural history  Renaissance  temperature  visual culture  Water  weight 

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Materiality, the Senses, and the Everyday

Posted By Karen-edis Barzman, Monday, May 1, 2017
Updated: Monday, May 1, 2017

This interdisciplinary Call for Papers seeks submissions that consider the use of material culture in the everyday, and the sensorial experience of objects in their original contexts. Papers could include the way objects engaged a variety of senses and/or encouraged bodily movement, prompting ritualized responses or eliciting new forms of spatial practice. Examples could investigate the use of liturgical objects in sacred spaces, the role of domestic or devotional items in residential quarters, the effects on the body of new materials and technologies in the trades and professions, and the incorporation of props in the performance of urban life. Papers related to understudied aspects of the sensorium are particularly welcome, especially those that consider objects and context engaging smell and taste. Geographic focus is unrestricted; temporal limits, c. 1300-1700.

Submissions Guidelines                                    
Proposals should be for 20-minute papers and should include

  • a preliminary title for the paper
  • an abstract of 150 words
  • a 1-page CV, including current institutional affiliation(s)
  • current contact information

Submit your proposal to kbarzman@binghamton.edu by Wednesday, May 31, 2017. Subject line: “RSA – Materiality, the Senses, and the Everyday.”

Tags:  devotional  domestic  everyday  liturgical  materiality  objects  performance  professions  props  residential  ritualized responses  senses  sensorium  smell  spatial practice  taste  technologies  trades  urban life 

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Sacred Geography

Posted By Jessica Weiss, Monday, April 24, 2017

Papers are invited for a session on sacred space at the Renaissance Society of America meeting in New Orleans from March 22-24, 2018. References to space and place abound during the Early Modern era, alongside changing ideas about theology and global geography. This session poses the questions: How did ideas about location, broadly defined, interact or intersect with notions of the sacred during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries? What can references, descriptions, depictions, or evocations of place through texts, images, and materials reveal about devotional ideas, practices, theological constructs, or belief systems? All papers related to place/space and spirituality will be considered, and proposals that push the boundaries of these categories are especially welcome.

Proposals for 20-minute papers should be sent to Jessica Weiss (jweiss16@msudenver.edu) by May 25th and should include the author’s name, professional affiliation, and contact information; the paper title (15-word maximum); a brief abstract (150-word maximum); and a brief CV (300-word maximum).

Tags:  Devotion  Geography  Materiality  Religion  Space  Spirituality  Visual Culture 

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