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History CFPs for RSA 2018 New Orleans
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This blog is for CFPs for sessions in history for RSA 2018 New Orleans. Members may post CFPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CFP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CFP. Make sure the CFP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CFP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CFP to submit a paper proposal. CFPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CFPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Gender and Early Modern Cartography

Posted By Camille Serchuk, Friday, April 21, 2017

How might attention to gender illuminate not only the allegorical margins, but also the production, patronage and consumption of early modern cartography?

This session welcomes papers that investigate the intersections of cartography and gender in pictorial and textual form. Some questions that might be considered include: how did early modern notions of gender inform the iconography of the continents or the depiction of their inhabitants? How are we to understand the role of gender in anthropomorphic/gynomorphic maps? How might research into gendered spaces frame our understanding of cartographic display or spatial measurement? In the interplay of reader and text, how does gender animate cartographic literature? How do cartographic inscriptions define consumers and the consumption of cartography? Was gender a factor in cartographic production? How might gender have shaped the patronage of cartography by Elizabeth I and Catherine de’Medici? Especially welcome are papers that bring new images/objects/texts to light, or that offer new approaches to familiar ones.

Deadline for abstracts is Monday, May 22nd, 2017. Please submit your paper’s title, an abstract of no more than 150 words, keywords, and a very brief CV (300 words, max), with contact information to Camille Serchuk (serchukc1@southernct.edu).

Tags:  cartography  femininity  gender  geography  mapping  maps  masculinity 

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Cartography and the Early Modern Archive

Posted By Karen-edis Barzman, Sunday, April 16, 2017
Updated: Sunday, April 16, 2017

The investment of sovereignties in mapping for the storage and delivery of geospatial information dates to the fifteenth century, when the Republic of Venice called for “true” representations of fortresses, towns, and contested borderlands in its territories (1460). While the intention was to be systematic, in Venice as elsewhere the development of a comprehensive cartographic archive was slow and uneven. This CfP invites submissions addressing the instrumental use of mapping in the management of the early modern state, with a focus on hand-drawn maps (from sketches to highly finished drawings with watercolor, silver, and gold leaf) intended for circulation in the inner chambers of administration. Also of interest are three-dimensional models of territory or maps in relief. Topics may include techniques for the collection of data and mapping itself although primary interest is in the accommodation of maps in the archive, their relation to archival documents in text, their evolving modalities of representation as instruments of statecraft, the new forms of literacy they demanded, their end-users, and their employment in policy-making, urban planning, empire-building, waging war, diplomacy, and maintenance peace. Geographic focus is unrestricted; temporal limits, c. 1300-1700.

Submissions Guidelines                                    
Proposals should be for 20-minute papers and should include

  • a preliminary title for the paper
  • an abstract of 150 words
  • a 1-page CV, including current institutional affiliation(s)
  • current contact information

Submit your proposal to kbarzman@binghamton.edu by Wednesday, May 31, 2017. Subject line: “RSA – Cartography and the Early Modern Archive.”

 

Tags:  archive  borderlands  cartography  diplomacy  documents  drawings  fortress  geospatial information  maps  peace  policy-making  sketches  state administration  territories  town  war. 

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