Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Sign In   |   Register
Literature CFPs for RSA 2018 New Orleans
Blog Home All Blogs
This blog is for CFPs for sessions in literature for RSA 2018 New Orleans. Members may post CFPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CFP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CFP. Make sure the CFP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CFP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CFP to submit a paper proposal. CFPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CFPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: Literature  poetry  Early Modern  poetics  history  Renaissance  Art History  drama  Italy  visual culture  Classical Reception  Classics  Early modern Spain  France  Historiography  Latin American Colonial literature  Politics  reception  Religion  Aesthetics  affect  antiquity  book history  England  gender  labor  Latin  magic  materiality  music 

Spenser's Pleasures

Posted By Colleen R. Rosenfeld, Friday, May 5, 2017

We seek papers on pleasure in Spenser's poetry: erotic, aesthetic, voyeuristic, indecorous, unlikely, limited, unruly, healthy and unhealthy.  Possible frameworks may include the Horatian pairing of instruction and delight, the didactic or anti-didactic value of pleasure, the relation of pleasure to action (as in a Ciceronian commitment to moving, for example), the relation of pleasure to questions of value (variously conceived), as well as pleasure's antitheses—disgust, pain, or loathing.  What is the place of pleasure in attacks on early modern poetry?  In poetry's defense?   We are interested in thinking about Spenser's verse in relation to the history of aesthetics but we are also interested in reversing the more familiar aesthetic paradigm: How might we locate scenes or sites not of a reader's pleasure but of a poet's pleasure? Or, to think along another axis: What is the place of pleasure in the practice of literary criticism? 

Please submit the following materials to Colleen Rosenfeld (colleen.rosenfeld@pomona.edu) by May 25 to be considered for inclusion: paper title; abstract (150-word maximum); 3-5 keywords; and a one-page abbreviated curriculum vitae (300-word maximum). Please note that RSA is very strict about word count: the system will not accept entries that go beyond the maximum limit.

Tags:  Aesthetics  Pleasure  Poetry  Spenser 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Discontinued Allegory

Posted By Colleen R. Rosenfeld, Friday, May 5, 2017

Discussions of allegory in The Faerie Queene, beginning with Spenser’s own, emphasize the immense scope of his “dark conceit.” It is a “vast allegory” (Fletcher), a poem that requires “a long memory and a distanced, somewhat relaxed view of its entanglements” (Teskey), and a “continued allegory” (Spenser). This panel invites abstracts for papers that explore Spenser’s interest in smaller, choppier, less enduring allegorical systems throughout his poetry. If an allegory’s scale is determined by its scope, "a long and perpetual metaphor" (Puttenham), what can we learn from allegorical frameworks that are abandoned, overlooked, or even just localized? What tools do our own critical methodologies offer for identifying and approaching such cruxes? What critical accounts do we tend to privilege in reconciling them? Possible topics include, but are not limited to: allegorical distraction and disruption; implicit allegory; misinterpretation (by characters, by readers); nostalgia and pastiche; ritual; construction and destruction; topical allegory; forgetting; indecision.

 

Please submit the following materials to Colleen Rosenfeld (colleen.rosenfeld@pomona.edu) by May 25 to be considered for inclusion: paper title; abstract (150-word maximum); 3-5 keywords; and a one-page abbreviated curriculum vitae (300-word maximum). Please note that RSA is very strict about word count: the system will not accept entries that go beyond the maximum limit.

Tags:  Allegory  Poetry  Spenser 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Titian

Posted By Jodi Cranston, Friday, May 5, 2017

Papers are invited to discuss any aspect relating to the 16th-century Venetian artist, Titian, and to his artworks. Although the session topic is framed monographically, we encourage papers that consider the engagement of Titian and his artworks with other artists, media, and geographical and social networks.

Submissions should be sent by May 15th to Jodi Cranston (cranston@bu.edu) and Joanna Woods-Marsden (jwm@humnet.ucla.edu), and should include the following information:

  • a paper title (15-word maximum)
  • abstract (150-word maximum) abstract guidelines
  • a very brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum). Prose bios will not be accepted. CV guidelines and models
  • general discipline area: History, Art History, Literature, or Other
  • any scheduling requests (scheduling requests will not be accepted after the submission deadline)

Tags:  court culture  materiality  ut pictura poesis  Venice 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

“Deep Classics” and the Renaissance

Posted By Caroline G. Stark, Thursday, May 4, 2017

As a new Associate Organization of the Renaissance Society of America, the Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR) invites proposals for papers to be delivered at the 2018 meeting of the RSA in New Orleans, LA.  For one of its inaugural panels, SEMCR invites abstracts on “Deep Classics” and the Renaissance.

Drawing on metaphors from fields as diverse as geology and evolution, the concept of “Deep Classics” has recently arisen out of, and in response to, the extraordinarily fertile field of classical reception studies. The term itself signals a consciousness of the distance, occlusions, and multiple strata that define any engagement with classical antiquity. In what has amounted to a programmatic statement of Deep Classics - or, perhaps more aptly, a programmatic fragment - Shane Butler has described its focus as “the very pose by which the human present turns its attention to the distant human past” (S. Butler, Deep Classics: Rethinking Classical Reception, Bloomsbury 2016). Although the founding volume of Deep Classics continues a trend in classical reception study, especially in the UK, of privileging Greek over Latin and modernity over early modernity, Butler is acutely sensitive to the broader applicability of the idea - “indeed, certain aspects of that pose have been important to Renaissance studies for a while now” - citing Barkan and, more recently, Nagel and Wood. We therefore welcome proposals that explore the relationship between Deep Classics and the Renaissance, in particular concerning ideas that “have less to do with ‘knowing’ than with other modes of affect and experience”.  In accordance with another central feature of Deep Classics, we also seek proposals that interrogate disciplinary configurations and self-conceptions.

The Society is committed to creating a congenial and collaborative forum for the infusion of new ideas into classics and early modern studies, and hence welcomes abstracts that are exploratory in nature as well as abstracts of latter-stage research.

Abstracts (150 words) and a short CV (300 words) should be sent as separate email attachments to caroline.stark@howard.edu (see the RSA's abstract guidelines and CV guidelines and models) by May 31, 2017.  The abstracts will be judged anonymously: please do not identify yourself on the abstract page.

Please include in the body of the email:

  • your name, affiliation, email address
  • your paper title (15-word maximum)
  • relevant keywords

Tags:  antiquity  Classical Reception  Classics  distance  Early Modern  Renaissance  self-conception  sensory experience  visual culture 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Encountering the ancients: philological reception in the Renaissance ​

Posted By Caroline G. Stark, Thursday, May 4, 2017

As a new Associate Organization of the Renaissance Society of America, the Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR) invites proposals for papers to be delivered at the 2018 meeting of the Renaissance Society of America in New Orleans, LA.  For one of its inaugural panels, SEMCR invites abstracts on classical philology in the Renaissance.

Renaissance engagement with the linguistic and literary culture of antiquity - whether in the form of language study, textual transmission, or translation - constitutes a relatively coherent body of evidence through which to understand the processes of and motivations for ‘receiving’ the classics. By studying the Renaissance appropriation of Greek and Latin philology, we find a vehicle of cross-cultural communication in an increasingly divided early modern Europe.  We welcome proposals that highlight the mutual benefits arising from closer engagement between classicists and early modernists on the topic of classical philology in the Renaissance.

The Society is committed to creating a congenial and collaborative forum for the infusion of new ideas into classics and early modern studies, and hence welcomes abstracts that are exploratory in nature as well as abstracts of latter-stage research.

Abstracts of no more than 150 words and a short CV of no more than 300 words should be sent as separate email attachments to caroline.stark@howard.edu (see the RSA's abstract guidelines and CV guidelines and models).  The abstracts will be judged anonymously: please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page.  Proposals must be received by May 31, 2017. 

Please include in the body of the email:

  • your name, affiliation, email address
  • your paper title (15-word maximum)
  • relevant keywords

Tags:  antiquity  classical philology  Classical Reception  Greek  language study  Latin  linguistics  Literature  philology  Renaissance  textual transmission  translation 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Unleashing the “mad Dogge”: Classical Reception in Early Modern Political Thought

Posted By Caroline G. Stark, Thursday, May 4, 2017

As a new Associate Organization of the Renaissance Society of America, the Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR) invites proposals for papers to be delivered at the 2018 meeting of the Renaissance Society of America in New Orleans, LA.  For one of its inaugural panels, SEMCR invites abstracts on the reception of classical texts in early modern political thought.

In Leviathan, Thomas Hobbes called ancient books a "Venime" akin "to the biting of a mad Dogge," which had the power to corrupt their readers and bring down monarchies.  Hobbes' violent reaction captures the authority Greek and Roman political thought commanded in a period of radical change in systems of government and, concomitantly, in contemporary theorizing about politics.  Early modern readers absorbed Plautus, Plutarch, and rhetorical handbooks along with the authors central to later modern formations of the classical canon like Homer and Cicero.  These texts helped give shape to new debates over legitimacy, authority, virtue, community, and a host of other vital issues.

This panel invites papers that illuminate the historical impact of that reception or make a methodological contribution to the study of the reception of political thought in particular.  Following recent developments in the field, it welcomes studies of poetry and other media as well as canonical prose texts (e.g., Marsilius of Padua, Christine de Pizan, Machiavelli, More, Bodin, Jonson, Grotius, Hobbes, Harrington, Cavendish, Makin, Locke).

The Society is committed to creating a congenial and collaborative forum for the infusion of new ideas into classics and early modern studies, and hence welcomes abstracts that are exploratory in nature as well as abstracts of latter-stage research.

Abstracts (150 words) and a short CV (300 words) should be sent as separate email attachments to caroline.stark@howard.edu (see the RSA's abstract guidelines and CV guidelines and models) by May 31, 2017.  The abstracts will be judged anonymously: please do not identify yourself on the abstract page.

Please include in the body of the email:

  • your name, affiliation, email address
  • your paper title (15-word maximum)
  • relevant keywords

Tags:  authority  Classical Reception  Classics  community  Early Modern  Hobbes  legitimacy  Locke  Machiavelli  More  policy-making  Political Thought  Politics  Renaissance  rhetoric  virtue 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Playing across languages: multilingual, transnational theater in early modern Europe

Posted By Kevin M. Chovanec, Thursday, May 4, 2017

In line with a wider transnational turn in literary studies, scholars of early modern theater have become increasingly interested in plays and players that traveled across political and linguistic borders. We are continuing to discover how travelling and mobility were central to the early modern theater, but already we have seen that this theater was a dynamic, hybrid space in which cultural exchange proved both lucrative and highly successful. This panel will further explore that success by focusing particularly on means of communication between players and audiences that did not always share a language: when English travelers performed in English to German-speaking audiences, for example, what strategies for identification and communication did they employ, and what surprising results stemmed from the linguistic incoherence? How were early modern players so often able to successfully negotiate foreign contexts and audiences? When an English play staged in London included multiple languages, how might this multilingualism imply to the audience national, ethnic, cultural, or religious difference or communion? What resources did the theater possess for communicating across linguistic divides? And how did the circulation of texts, players, and ‘theatergrams’ through these language contexts shape the early modern theater more generally?

Topics might include (though certainly are not limited to) the following: gestural language; multilingualism; circulation and adaptation; translation; dramatic spaces of cultural exchange; non-national identities; dumb shows; theater networks; music and performance; digital approaches (mapping, networking) investigating the travelers.

Please send a 150 word abstract and a brief CV (no more than 300 words, as specified by RSA) to Kevin Chovanec (chovanec@email.unc.edu) by May 31, 2017. 

This post has not been tagged.

Permalink
 

CFP: ELEMENTAL FORCE

Posted By Thalia E. Allington-Wood, Thursday, May 4, 2017
Drowning, falling, floating, growing, burning, melting. How are elements figured in Renaissance and early modern artistic representation? From imagery of earth, water, air and fire, to the more ubiquitous sense of temperature, weight, darkness and light, how does visual culture contribute to an understanding of the elements in this period? From the thrusting up of rocks from beneath the earth through volcanoes and earthquakes, to the wide expanse of the cosmos, knowledge of natural phenomena was prominent in the Renaissance and early modern imagination. How do objects harness the elements in their production? What, for example, is the role of fire and earth in metal works and ceramics? Equally, how did elemental forces act upon and alter works of art – from physical damage to the influence of regional topographies, materials and pigments?

The landscape of elemental physics changed dramatically between 1300 and 1700. This history is characterised by a broad paradigm shift from a sublunar, terrestrial world made up of the four elements and their specific material attributes (hot, cold, heavy, light), to a globe experienced through Mercator’s seas, Galileo’s sky and Newton’s earth. Yet the elements, their effects upon the body, their power to manifest material things – and how they are imagined and contested in visual culture – do not always sit easily within this chronology. The representation of these forces is the focus of this panel. It is a subject that has the power to open up broader concerns regarding memory, motion, travel, sensory experience, metamorphosis, environmentalism and networks of knowledge exchange – social, cultural and political.

We welcome papers from across disciplines, from within Europe and beyond Western contexts. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

- The elements and their early modern properties: Earth/ Rock, Water, Air, Fire; hot, cold, wet, dry, heavy, light.
- Elements as complex, compound mixtures.
- Materiality & Making: sculpture and stone, ceramics and glass, metal and fire, water and fountains, earth and pigments.
- Elemental/ material states: solid, liquid and in-between.
- The effects of the elements upon the body: falling, burning, pain, joy, drowning, disease, phenomenological and sensory approaches to elemental force.
- Understanding within academic disciplines: natural philosophy, alchemy, chemistry, theories of metamorphosis.
- Cosmos: stars, sky, separation of celestial and terrestrial physics.
- Gravity.
- Light & Shadow.
- Manifestations of the elements in nature: wind, clouds, volcanoes, rivers, the sea, mountains, natural disasters such as earthquakes, floods, storms.
- Connections to landscape, geography, environmentalism, catastrophism, the non-human.
- Water & Travel: wetscapes, navigation and shipwreck, hydrographies.

Please send a paper title, abstract (150 word maximum), keywords, and a brief curriculum vitae (300 word maximum – see RSA guidelines for requirements) to thalia.allington-wood@ucl.ac.uk and sophie.morris@ucl.ac.uk by 31 May 2017
 

Tags:  Air  early modern  Earth  Elements  Fire  Literature  Materiality  natural history  Renaissance  sensory experience  temperature  visual culture  water  weight 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Loving Violence in early modern Hispanic poetry

Posted By Nicole D. Legnani, Wednesday, May 3, 2017

At its philological core, Renaissance humanism both professed a “loving violence” towards Antiquity and also loved violence itself. As Eugenio Garin explains, Renaissance philology could best be characterized as an othering process or “loving violence” that deadened Antiquity so that “a whole world closed up; and it was rediscovered at the very point where it was most closed.” Or in Thomas Greene’s formulation, the Renaissance walked with its path lit “by the light behind of a vast holocaust:” the fire that destroyed Troy, the “light in Troy” which had illuminated Aeneas’s course for a new empire.

We seek papers on early modern Spanish and Portuguese poetry that explore “loving violence,”  understood as both the love of violence as well as that violence performed “lovingly,” be it of Antiquity, of the Castilian tradition, or of the poetic speaker’s Beloved, etc. The epic genre elicits violence in various forms (discursive, representative, symbolic, material, etc.), while love lyric is animated by a desire that, as Roland Greene and others have argued, is akin to Spain’s colonial desire.

Please send proposals (250 words and 5 to 10 keywords) and a 2-page CV to nlegnani@princeton.edu and felipe.valencia@usu.edu by Friday, May 26, 2017.


Tags:  antiquity  early modern Spanish poetry  epic  Latin American Colonial literature  love  lyric  philology  violence 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Cervantine Dialogue

Posted By Susan Byrne, Monday, May 1, 2017
Updated: Wednesday, May 17, 2017

The RSA Division in Hispanic Literature and the Cervantes Society of America (CSA) invite proposals for the following panel:

In the prologue to his Ocho comedias y ocho entremeses (1615), Cervantes recalls the simplicity of theater in his youth, casting aside the ornate costumes, scenarios, and devices of the comedia nueva to give pride of place to dialogue. In Don Quijote (1605), his hero returns home after only five chapters, so that he might sally forth again with Sancho Panza, an interlocutor who assumes many of the functions performed until then by the narrator. We welcome proposals that address the artistic, structural, documentary, and social dimensions of dialogue in Cervantes’s writings.

Submission of proposals:

Please indicate the name of the panel that interests you and send a single page that has both an abstract of less than 150 words and a brief curriculum vitae to both organizers: Susan Byrne (susan.byrne[at]unlv.edu) and David A. Boruchoff (david.boruchoff[at]mcgill.ca). See the guidelines for CVs on the RSA’s annual meeting page.

Proposals must be received byMonday, 29 May 2017.

Please note: Presentations may be made in English or in Spanish. The title and abstract must be written in the language in which the presentation will be given.

To present in a session sponsored by the CSA, you must be or become an up-to-date member of the CSA.

Download File (PDF)

Tags:  dialogue  early modern Spain  Miguel de Cervantes 

PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 5 of 8
1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8
Membership Software Powered by YourMembership  ::  Legal