Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Sign In   |   Register
Literature CFPs for RSA 2018 New Orleans
Blog Home All Blogs
This blog is for CFPs for sessions in literature for RSA 2018 New Orleans. Members may post CFPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CFP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CFP. Make sure the CFP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CFP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CFP to submit a paper proposal. CFPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CFPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: Literature  poetry  Early Modern  poetics  history  Renaissance  Art History  drama  Italy  visual culture  Classical Reception  Classics  Early modern Spain  France  Historiography  Latin American Colonial literature  Politics  reception  Religion  Aesthetics  affect  antiquity  book history  England  gender  labor  Latin  magic  materiality  music 

Cervantes’s Critical Readings

Posted By Susan Byrne, Monday, May 1, 2017
Updated: Wednesday, May 17, 2017

The RSA Division in Hispanic Literature and the Cervantes Society of America (CSA) invite proposals for the following panel:

Beyond the comments of the Priest and Barber, and of other characters in his works, Cervantes was an astute and always critical reader of literary genres (chivalric, picaresque, pastoral, etc.), unwilling to adopt their conventions without addressing their merits and demerits.

Submission of proposals:

Please indicate the name of the panel that interests you and send a single page that has both an abstract of less than 150 words and a brief curriculum vitae to both organizers: Susan Byrne (susan.byrne[at]unlv.edu) and David A. Boruchoff (david.boruchoff[at]mcgill.ca). See the guidelines for CVs on the RSA’s annual meeting page.

Proposals must be received by Monday, 29 May 2017.

Please note: Presentations may be made in English (the primary language of the RSA) or in Spanish, and should bear in mind the interdisciplinary makeup of the RSA, as well as the need to be intelligible to scholars whose primary interests and expertise may lie outside the Spanish-speaking world. The title and abstract must be written in the language in which the presentation will be given.

To present in a session sponsored by the Cervantes Society of America, you must also be or become an up-to-date member of the CSA.

Download File (PDF)

Tags:  Literature  Miguel de Cervantes  poetics 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

The Classics in New World Verse

Posted By Susan Byrne, Monday, May 1, 2017
Updated: Wednesday, May 17, 2017

The RSA Division in Hispanic Literature and the Cervantes Society of America (CSA) invite proposals for the following panel:

Both Bernardo de Balbuena’s Grandeza mexicana and Sor Juana’s Primero sueño incorporate multiple references to classical authors. We welcome proposals that explore the use made of classical sources by these two authors and/or their contemporaries in New Spain.

Submission of proposals:

Please indicate the name of the panel that interests you and send a single page that has both an abstract of less than 150 words and a brief curriculum vitae to both organizers: Susan Byrne (susan.byrne[at]unlv.edu) and David A. Boruchoff (david.boruchoff[at]mcgill.ca). See the guidelines for CVs on the RSA’s annual meeting page.

Proposals must be received by Monday, 29 May 2017.

 Please note: Presentations may be made in English (the primary language of the RSA) or in Spanish, and should bear in mind the interdisciplinary makeup of the RSA, as well as the need to be intelligible to scholars whose primary interests and expertise may lie outside the Spanish-speaking world. The title and abstract must be written in the language in which the presentation will be given.

Download File (PDF)

Tags:  Classics  Latin American Colonial literature  poetics  poetry 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

The Poetic Gloss

Posted By Susan Byrne, Monday, May 1, 2017
Updated: Wednesday, May 17, 2017

The RSA Division in Hispanic Literature and the Cervantes Society of America (CSA) invite proposals for the following panel

From Fernando de Herrera’s commentaries on Garcilaso de la Vega to poetic jousts and Don Diego de Miranda’s son Lorenzo’s glosses in Don Quijote (II, 18) – how did early modern Spanish poets read and respond to one another? What part did glosses play in the development of Spanish poetics?

 

Submission of proposals:

Please indicate the name of the panel that interests you and send a single page that has both an abstract of less than 150 words and a brief curriculum vitae to both organizers: Susan Byrne (susan.byrne[at]unlv.edu) and David A. Boruchoff (david.boruchoff[at]mcgill.ca). See the guidelines for CVs on the RSA’s annual meeting page.

Proposals must be received by Monday, 29 May 2017.

Please note: Presentations may be made in English (the primary language of the RSA) or in Spanish, and should bear in mind the interdisciplinary makeup of the RSA, as well as the need to be intelligible to scholars whose primary interests and expertise may lie outside the Spanish-speaking world. The title and abstract must be written in the language in which the presentation will be given.

Download File (PDF)

Tags:  Early modern Spain  glosses  poetics  poetry 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

The Brothers Valdés

Posted By Susan Byrne, Monday, May 1, 2017
Updated: Wednesday, May 17, 2017

The RSA Division in Hispanic Literature and the Cervantes Society of America (CSA) invite proposals for the following panel:

What the writings of Alfonso and Juan de Valdés tell us about life under Charles V: language, art, history, politics, religion.

Submission of proposals:

Please indicate the name of the panel that interests you and send a single page that has both an abstract of less than 150 words and a brief curriculum vitae to both organizers: Susan Byrne (susan.byrne[at]unlv.edu) and David A. Boruchoff (david.boruchoff[at]mcgill.ca). See the guidelines for CVs on the RSA’s annual meeting page.

Proposals must be received by Monday, 29 May 2017.

Please note: Presentations may be made in English (the primary language of the RSA) or in Spanish, and should bear in mind the interdisciplinary makeup of the RSA, as well as the need to be intelligible to scholars whose primary interests and expertise may lie outside the Spanish-speaking world. The title and abstract must be written in the language in which the presentation will be given.

Download File (PDF)

Tags:  Alfonso de Valdés  early modern Spain  Juan de Valdés  Literature 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Early Modern Drama in the Americas

Posted By Susan Byrne, Monday, May 1, 2017
Updated: Wednesday, May 17, 2017

The RSA Division in Hispanic Literature and the Cervantes Society of America (CSA) invite proposals for the following panel:

Practice, purpose, and message: from allegorical plays to derisive jest and missionary theater. Autos sacramentales, juegos de escarnio, entremeses, mitotes, areites, and comedias: what did these works mean to the people who staged them, and how were they received? Did their place of representation in the New World distinguish them from Old World theatrical performances?

 Submission of proposals:

Please indicate the name of the panel that interests you and send a single page that has both an abstract of less than 150 words and a brief curriculum vitae to both organizers: Susan Byrne (susan.byrne[at]unlv.edu) and David A. Boruchoff (david.boruchoff[at]mcgill.ca). See the guidelines for CVs on the RSA’s annual meeting page.

Proposals must be received by Monday, 29 May 2017.

Please note: Presentations may be made in English (the primary language of the RSA) or in Spanish, and should bear in mind the interdisciplinary makeup of the RSA, as well as the need to be intelligible to scholars whose primary interests and expertise may lie outside the Spanish-speaking world. The title and abstract must be written in the language in which the presentation will be given.

Download File (PDF)

Tags:  Latin American Colonial literature  Theater 

Permalink
 

New Approaches to Poetry by Women of Early Modern Spain

Posted By Elizabeth B. Davis, Monday, May 1, 2017

A Panel Sponsored by the Society for Renaissance and Baroque Hispanic Poetry

 The 1980s and 1990s witnessed the publication of several anthologies of texts by early modern Hispanic women writing inside convent walls and beyond. These newly edited texts set the stage for three decades of groundbreaking scholarly work on early modern women writers in Spain and elsewhere. The body of work that has resulted from this enterprise has radically changed the way we think about early modern Spanish literature and culture. Much of the scholarship on the production of these women focuses on narrative and on theater, despite the fact that there exists a large corpus of women’s poetry from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, some of it practically unknown. In this panel, we seek to learn how recent theoretical approaches and innovations in critical practice offer an opportunity to reconsider the extraordinary work accomplished by early modern Spanish women poets.

Please send a 200 word abstract, a list of key words, and a brief CV (no more than 300 words) in a single Word document to Elizabeth Davis (davis.823@osu.edu) by Thursday 25 May 2017. See guidelines for CVs on the RSA’s annual meeting page. While the RSA requests that participants make an effort to prepare papers in English, Spanish presentations will be considered (note that abstract and paper must be written in the same language).

Tags:  early modern Spain  poetics  poetry  religious poetry  women poets  women writers 

Permalink
 

The space in between: Reconsidering the distance that separates early modern fact from fiction

Posted By Kelsey Ihinger, Monday, May 1, 2017
Updated: Monday, May 29, 2017

In the era of “alternative facts” and “fake news” one may rightfully question where objectivity lies. It may seem that the distance between fact and fiction is growing increasingly blurrier in today’s world, but this is not a question relevant only in our current, rapidly-changing political climate. History as a discipline has evolved since the early modern period into a genre epitomized by its objectivity, yet according to Hayden White all historians perform a “poetic act” upon writing down the stories they plan to tell. We may consider, then, the space that exists between the literary and historical genres as a space of productive contemplation. This panel seeks papers that consider the question of separation or contact between fact and fiction in the early modern period, when histories and chronicles were written with royal patronage, when religion permeated a country’s understanding of truth, and when news came in the form of propagandistic pamphlets. In this era, can there exist a real division between fact and fiction? How does our reading of the chronicle change when considered through the lens of literary criticism rather than historiography? How do the various historical genres—historical drama, news pamphlets, chronicles—interact with their historical subject and the author’s ability to manipulate it? How does the early modern author who writes about history conceive of his own task? These are questions that this panel will explore as it seeks to open up the space that exists between history and literature in the early modern period.

 Please send a 150-word abstract and a 300-word CV to Kelsey Ihinger (ihinger@wisc.edu). Proposals must be received by end of day on Friday, May 12. This panel will be sponsored by the Center for Early Modern Studies of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Tags:  Chronicles  Historical Drama  Historiography  Literature 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Iberian Pornographies, 1300-1650

Posted By Chad Leahy, Sunday, April 30, 2017
Updated: Sunday, April 30, 2017

We invite papers that broadly interrogate ‘pornography’ and ‘the pornographic’ in the context of Early Modern Iberia and its global colonial kingdoms. We encourage innovative responses to questions that include, but are not limited to: What new critical and theoretical tools can be brought to bear in putting the post-Enlightenment category of the ‘pornographic’ in dialogue with Early Modern texts and practices? What constitutes ‘pornography’ and where do we locate it in Imperial Spain and Portugal? What social, political, economic work does ‘pornography’ do in this context? How is ‘pornography’ regulated or resisted by institutions or individuals (i.e.  confessors, moralists, theologians, the Inquisition)? How is it circulated and consumed? In what media (manuscript or print; painting, sculpture, tapestry; poetry, prose, theater; music) is it transmitted? How do the particular material or structural constraints of a given medium affect representation, circulation, or consumption? How might the ‘pornographic’ manifest itself in unexpected places (i.e. religious art or treatises)? How might a ‘pornographic’ lens help shed new light on early modern Iberian artistic, literary, and historiographic canons? 


Please send paper titles, abstracts (150 words max.), and keywords to nick.jones@bucknell.edu and chad.leahy@du.edu by Wednesday, May 24.

Tags:  Art  Body  Erotic  Historiography  Literature  Pornography 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Re-reading Lope Through His Epic

Posted By Chad Leahy, Sunday, April 30, 2017
 
A Panel Sponsored by the RSA Discipline Group in Hispanic Literature
 
We invite papers that freshly interrogate Lope de Vega’s vast and varied corpus of non-epic work (i.e., lyric, comedias, prose fiction, letters, historiography, polemics) through the lens of his equally large and diverse epic production. The apparition in recent years of reliable annotated editions of most of his epic poems has coincided with a renewed interest in the epic in Spanish Golden Age poetry studies. Aided by these developments, how might Lope’s many epics allow us to broadly reinterpret the Lopian canon? Potential avenues of inquiry include: Lope’s use of epic to transgress or push traditional genre boundaries; Lope, the rota Virgilii, and the construction of a literary career; the use of epic forms or themes in non-epic contexts (or vice-versa); epic self-fashioning; epic in literary polemic; problematizing epic in Lope’s historical reception.  Please send proposal (150 words; 5-10 keywords) and 2-page CV to chad.leahy@du.edu and felipe.valencia@usu.edu by Wednesday, May 24. 

Tags:  epic poetry  Hispanic Literature  Lope de Vega 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Ut pictura poesis: Poetry, Painting, and Patronage in the Spanish Baroque at the Quadricentenary of Bartolomé Esteban Murillo

Posted By Elizabeth B. Davis, Sunday, April 30, 2017
Updated: Sunday, April 30, 2017

A Panel Sponsored by the Society for Renaissance and Baroque Hispanic Poetry

This panel will consider how notions about the shared aesthetic experience of poetry and painting are exercised during the Spanish Baroque, and the extent to which the realities of patronage mediate, modify or detract from the power of the poetic word to evoke a spectacular and inspirational visual image.

The Horatian formulation of the analogy between poetry and painting may serve as a point of entrance into larger considerations about the connections between poetry, painting and patronage in the work of poets and painters of the Spanish Baroque. The topos that poems are paintings that speak, and that paintings are poems without words, enjoyed great currency in Humanist circles during the Spanish Renaissance. It can be said, however, that even as it was a point of debate, this idea continued to influence the way that poets and painters conceived of their life’s work well into the seventeenth century. At the same time, both artists of the word and those of the brush, such as Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1617-1682) and his Seville school, depended on a patronage system in which patrons and clientele had a direct effect on the kind of poems and paintings artists could produce.

 Please send a 200 word abstract, a list of key words, and a brief CV (no more than 300 words) in a single Word document to Elizabeth Davis (davis.823@osu.edu) by Thursday 25 May 2017. See guidelines for CVs on the RSA’s annual meeting page. While the RSA requests that participants make an effort to prepare papers in English, Spanish presentations will be considered (note that abstract and paper must be written in the same language).

Tags:  Art History  Bartolomé Esteban Murillo  painting and poetry  patronage  poetics  Seville school  Spanish Baroque  ut pictura poesis  Visual Culture 

PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 6 of 8
1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8
Membership Software Powered by YourMembership  ::  Legal