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Interdisciplinary and Other CFPs for RSA 2018 New Orleans
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This blog is for CFPs for interdisciplinary and miscellaneous sessions for RSA 2018 New Orleans. Members may post CFPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CFP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CFP. Make sure the CFP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CFP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CFP to submit a paper proposal. CFPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CFPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Top tags: Literature  philosophy  Italy  Religion  Art History  Devotion  music  translation  visual culture  early modern  gender  Historiography  Renaissance  Spain  architecture  Classical Reception  Colonial Latin America  Digital Humanities  France  humanism  Interdisciplinarity  language  Latin  Materiality  poetry  rhetoric  Art  classics  England  history 

Language and Languages in Renaissance Philosophy

Posted By David A. Lines, Wednesday, May 3, 2017

What language should philosophy speak? And, within a particular language, what models should it follow, and what registers should it adopt? These kinds of questions were key to numerous Renaissance philosophical discussions. Especially in Italy, France, and Spain they gave rise to spirited debates about which kind of Latin was suitable for discussing philosophy, and whether the vernacular languages were appropriate for discussing concepts for which scholastic Latin had long developed a technical vocabulary. This panel will consider this issue, whenever possible in a comparative perspective. 

Please send a 200 word abstract, a list of key words, and a brief CV (no more than 300 words) in a single Word document to the discipline representative for Philosophy, David Lines (D.A.Lines@warwick.ac.uk) by Friday, 26 May 2017. See guidelines for CVs on the RSA’s annual meeting page.

Tags:  language  philosophy 

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Philosophical Translation(s) in the Renaissance

Posted By David A. Lines, Wednesday, May 3, 2017

An understudied aspect in the growing field of Renaissance translation is whether and how the approach to translation was different in philosophy from other fields such as literature. This panel is meant to address how Renaissance translators of philosophical works (including their own) saw their activity: whether as part of more general debates about the theory and practice of translation, or as a special case. Papers would be welcomed dealing with either vertical translation (e.g., Greek to Latin or Latin to vernacular) or horizontal translation (from one vernacular to the other). Ideally, papers would examine both an interpreter's explicit theoretical statements about translation and particular aspects of practice. 

Please send a 200 word abstract, a list of key words, and a brief CV (no more than 300 words) in a single Word document to the discipline representative for Philosophy, David Lines (D.A.Lines@warwick.ac.uk) by Friday, 26 May 2017. See guidelines for CVs on the RSA’s annual meeting page.

Tags:  philosophy  translation 

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Humanism and Scholasticism in Renaissance Philosophy

Posted By David A. Lines, Wednesday, May 3, 2017

P. O. Kristeller famously maintained that humanism and scholasticism flourished side by side in the Renaissance, leading to interactions that were not adversarial and did not necessarily lead to the demise of the one when compared to the other. I am therefore proposing one or more sessions on the relationship between the two in Renaissance philosophy. Of particular interest may be how fifteenth- and sixteenth-century humanists regarded the scholastic tradition, whether in Latin or in other languages.

Please send a 200 word abstract, a list of key words, and a brief CV (no more than 300 words) in a single Word document to the discipline representative for Philosophy, David Lines (D.A.Lines@warwick.ac.uk) by Friday, 26 May 2017. See guidelines for CVs on the RSA’s annual meeting page.

Tags:  humanism  philosophy  scholasticism 

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New Approaches to Poetry by Women of Early Modern Spain

Posted By Elizabeth B. Davis, Monday, May 1, 2017

The publication of several anthologies of texts written by early modern Hispanic women in the 1980s and 90s set the stage for three decades of groundbreaking scholarly work on early modern women writers in Spain. The body of work that has resulted from this enterprise has radically changed the way we think about the Spanish “Golden Age”. Much of the scholarship on early modern Spanish women writers focuses on narrative, in spite of the fact that there exists a large corpus of women’s poetry from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. This panel seeks to focus new scholarly attention on religious and secular poetry written by women in early modern Spain. We seek to learn how recent innovations in critical practice offer an opportunity to reconsider the production of early modern women poets in Spain.

 Please send a 200 word abstract, a list of key words, and a brief CV (no more than 300 words) in a single Word document to Elizabeth Davis (davis.823@osu.edu) by Thursday 25 May 2017. See guidelines for CVs on the RSA’s annual meeting page. While the RSA requests that participants make an effort to prepare papers in English, Spanish presentations will be considered (note that abstract and paper must be written in the same language).

This panel is sponsored by the Society for Renaissance and Baroque Hispanic Poetry.

Tags:  convent writing  early modern women writers  religious poetry  Spanish women poets 

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Remapping Influence. New Studies of Lyric and the Iberian Empires

Posted By Elizabeth B. Davis, Monday, May 1, 2017

Narratives of influence are usually unidirectional. This is especially the case for narratives of imperial centers and peripheries in which influence is often depicted as belated, exaggerated or marked by artistic anxiety. Curiously, however, the imperial peripheries of Spanish and Portuguese empires were also locales of innovative experiments that often anticipated or surpassed metropolitan lyric form. These panels seek papers that invert common narratives of influence by discussing the innovation of lyric in peripheral geographies, boomerang effects of imperial lyric on the metropolis, lyric form that traveled with authors to and from imperial frontiers, dislocated centers of experimentation, and ways in which the geography of empire itself forced new forms of lyric circulation. How do these innovations and renewals force a reconsideration of the terms of imperial lyric? What does lyric do in and to Iberian empires?

Please send a 200-word abstract, a list of key words, and a brief CV (no more than 300 words) in a single Word document to Juan Vitulli (jvitulli@nd.edu) and Anna More (anna1more1@gmail.com) by by Monday, 15 May 2017. See guidelines for CVs on the RSA’s annual meeting page. While the RSA requests that participants make an effort to prepare papers in English, Spanish presentations will be considered (note that abstract and paper must be written in the same language)

This panel is sponsored by the Society for Renaissance and Baroque Hispanic Poetry.

Tags:  Barroco de Indias  Colonial Latin America  Iberia  imperial lyric  Portugal  Spain  spheres of influence 

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Ut pictura poesis: Poetry, Painting, and Patronage in the Spanish Baroque at the Quadricentenary of Bartolomé Esteban Murillo

Posted By Elizabeth B. Davis, Monday, May 1, 2017

This panel will consider how notions about the shared aesthetic experience of poetry and painting are exercised during the Spanish Baroque, and the extent to which the realities of patronage mediate, modify or detract from the power of the poetic word to evoke a spectacular and inspirational visual image.

 The Horatian formulation of the analogy between poetry and painting may serve as a point of entrance into larger considerations about the connections between poetry, painting and patronage in the work of poets and painters of the Spanish Baroque. The topos that poems are paintings that speak, and that paintings are poems without words, enjoyed great currency in Humanist circles during the Spanish Renaissance. It can be said, however, that even as it was a point of debate, this idea continued to influence the way that poets and painters conceived of their life’s work well into the seventeenth century. At the same time, both artists of the word and those of the brush, such as Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1617-1682) and his Seville school, depended on a patronage system in which patrons and clientele had a direct effect on the kind of poems and paintings artists could produce.

Please send a 200 word abstract, a list of key words, and a brief CV (no more than 300 words) in a single Word document to Elizabeth Davis (davis.823@osu.edu) by Thursday 25 May 2017. See guidelines for CVs on the RSA’s annual meeting page. While the RSA requests that participants make an effort to prepare papers in English, Spanish presentations will be considered (note that abstract and paper must be written in the same language).

This panel is sponsored by the Society for Renaissance and Baroque Hispanic Poetry.

Tags:  Bartolomé Esteban Murillo  painting  patronage  poetry  poetry and painting  Seville school  Spanish Baroque  ut pictura poesis 

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Painted Faces, Tainted Morals: Renaissance Cosmetics and Makeup

Posted By Tijana Zakula, Monday, May 1, 2017

The pain and dangers of beauty have been known for a long time and have been inextricably intertwined with art. Not only in terms of emulating the ideal, but also in terms of the know-how: diverse pigments and materials used for painting oftentimes served as beautifying aides. Not infrequently these substances were highly toxic and would lead to severe disfigurements and one’s untimely demise.

The social implications of using cosmetics and make up were no less damaging either. Improving on one’s outer appearance was nothing short of scandalous. One’s attempt to come closer to the unattainable ideal was considered immoral, and inextricably intertwined with vanity – the mother of all sins.

This multidisciplinary session seeks contributions that consider the use and abuse of cosmetics and makeup from the point of view of art history, sociology, chemistry, medicine and history and philosophy of science.

Please send proposals to Tijana Zakula (t.zakula1@uu.nl) and Gert Jan Vroege (G.J.Vroege@uu.nl) no later than 4 June.

Include in your proposal:

·        name and affiliation

·        paper title (max. 15 words)

·        abstract (max. 150 words)

·        a brief CV (max. 300 words).

 

Tags:  Art History  beauty  Early Modernity  etiquette 

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Materiality, the Senses, and the Everyday

Posted By Karen-edis Barzman, Monday, May 1, 2017

Call for Papers: Interdisciplinary/Comparative Panel(s)

Materiality, the Senses, and the Everyday

Renaissance Society of America Annual Conference

New Orleans, 22–24 March 2018

 

This interdisciplinary Call for Papers seeks submissions that consider the use of material culture in the everyday, and the sensorial experience of objects in their original contexts. Papers could include the way objects engaged a variety of senses and/or encouraged bodily movement, prompting ritualized responses or eliciting new forms of spatial practice. Examples could investigate the use of liturgical objects in sacred spaces, the role of domestic or devotional items in residential quarters, the effects on the body of new materials and technologies in the trades and professions, and the incorporation of props in the performance of urban life. Papers related to understudied aspects of the sensorium are particularly welcome, especially those that consider objects and context engaging smell and taste. Geographic focus is unrestricted; temporal limits, c. 1300-1700.

Submissions Guidelines                                    
Proposals should be for 20-minute papers and should include

  • a preliminary title for the paper
  • an abstract of 150 words
  • a 1-page CV, including current institutional affiliation(s)
  • current contact information

Submit your proposal to kbarzman@binghamton.edu by Wednesday, May 31, 2017. Subject line: “RSA – Materiality, the Senses, and the Everyday.”

Tags:  devotional  domestic  everyday  liturgical  materiality  objects  performance  professions  props  residential  ritualized responses  senses  sensorium  smell  spatial practice  taste  technologies  trades  urban life 

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The space in between: Reconsidering the distance that separates early modern fact from fiction

Posted By Kelsey Ihinger, Monday, May 1, 2017

In the era of “alternative facts” and “fake news” one may rightfully question where objectivity lies. It may seem that the distance between fact and fiction is growing increasingly blurrier in today’s world, but this is not a question relevant only in our current, rapidly-changing political climate. History as a discipline has evolved since the early modern period into a genre epitomized by its objectivity, yet according to Hayden White all historians perform a “poetic act” upon writing down the stories they plan to tell. We may consider, then, the space that exists between the literary and historical genres as a space of productive contemplation. This panel seeks papers that consider the question of separation or contact between fact and fiction in the early modern period, when histories and chronicles were written with royal patronage, when religion permeated a country’s understanding of truth, and when news came in the form of propagandistic pamphlets. In this era, can there exist a real division between fact and fiction? How does our reading of the chronicle change when considered through the lens of literary criticism rather than historiography? How do the various historical genres—historical drama, news pamphlets, chronicles—interact with their historical subject and the author’s ability to manipulate it? How does the early modern author who writes about history conceive of his own task? These are questions that this panel will explore as it seeks to open up the space that exists between history and literature in the early modern period.

 Please send a 150-word abstract and a 300-word CV to Kelsey Ihinger (ihinger@wisc.edu). Proposals must be received by Friday, May 12. This panel will be sponsored by the Center for Early Modern Studies of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Tags:  Chronicles  Historical Drama  Historiography  Literature 

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Representations of the Continents in the Early Modern World

Posted By Louise Arizzoli, Saturday, April 29, 2017

European artists and writers visualized the known world through personifications holding attributes related to each continent. After its discovery, America was added to the figures of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Allegories developed, reviving the Greek habit to depict abstract concepts in the human form. During the sixteenth century, continent personifications started to appear in pageants, atlases and prints, and became a very popular iconographical motif throughout Europe in all artistic media. These figures clearly show the way Europeans perceived the rest of the world - often characterized as a stereotypical Other – and were generally designed to express Europe’s belief of its own superiority, as well as its quest for a newer global identity.

We are welcoming papers for a session at the Renaissance Society of America, New Orleans, 22- 24 March 2018, dealing broadly with visual, literary and cartographical representations of the continents in the early modern world, from different regions of Europe. We would also welcome presentations on ancient and medieval sources for the continents’ iconography--the themes of Europa and the Bull, Africa with elephant tusk headdress, Asia with incense burner, and the Adoration of the Magi; transformations in America from cannibalistic to civilized; personification of cities and rivers, as well as travel accounts, early modern maps, and literary descriptions of the known and unknown continents. We would also welcome papers dealing with non-western perspectives – artistic or cartographical – on Europe. This call for papers would like to expand on the sessions of RSA held in Chicago 2017.

Please send proposals to Louise Arizzoli (larizzol@olemiss.edu) and Maryanne Horowitz (horowitz@oxy.edu). Include in your proposal: name and affiliation, paper title (max. 15 words), abstract (max. 150 words), and a brief CV (max. 300 words; in ordinary CV format).

Email proposals as soon as possible, but no later than May 25, 2017.

Applicants will hear whether paper proposal fits in this group submission by 4 June, for the RSA submission deadline of 7 June 2017.

 

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