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Interdisciplinary and Other CFPs for RSA 2018 New Orleans
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This blog is for CFPs for interdisciplinary and miscellaneous sessions for RSA 2018 New Orleans. Members may post CFPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CFP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CFP. Make sure the CFP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CFP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CFP to submit a paper proposal. CFPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CFPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Top tags: Literature  philosophy  Italy  Religion  Art History  Devotion  music  translation  visual culture  early modern  gender  Historiography  Renaissance  Spain  architecture  Classical Reception  Colonial Latin America  Digital Humanities  France  humanism  Interdisciplinarity  language  Latin  Materiality  poetry  rhetoric  Art  classics  England  history 

Scanning the Page: Mise-en-Page and Textuality in Early Modern Print

Posted By Taylor Clement, Saturday, April 22, 2017

The purpose of this session is to investigate the interface of the page in the early modern printed book. From D. F. Mckenzie’s Bibliography and Sociology of Texts (1986) to Bonnie Mak’s How the Page Matters (2011), many bibliographic and textual studies focus on the importance and materiality of the page. The page presents a two-dimensional (or, in cases of flap books and volvelles, three-dimensional) space in which readers engage not only with verbal language, but also with various other signs and shapes, including blank space, printer’s flowers, punctuation marks, manicules, borders, illustrations, letter forms, etc. These forms and shapes on the page are not incidental to the text they accompany; readers simultaneously process words, layout, and images as they navigate books and pages. This panel session thus seeks to further explore the visual arrangement of media on the page and the various early modern print conventions that function as modes of expression or set parameters for readers’ engagement with ideas.

We invite paper proposals that investigate ways in which early modern mise-en-page signifies to readers of printed lyric anthologies, plays, prose treaties, emblem books, pastoral poetry, translations, and a multitude of other works. How do the inked marks beyond those of verbal language actively engage readers in meaning-making between the visual and verbal elements? How do these marks blur the boundaries between text and paratext? What is the potential of the early modern page to be read as an image? What can printed marks tell us about early modern graphic design in printing houses, and how do printers shape the reading experience through size, shapes, layout and other features of the page?

Submissions from all disciplines are welcome.

Please submit your paper proposal no later than 20 May 2017 to Deborah Solomon at dsolomon@aum.edu. Each proposal must include the following:

 

Tags:  book history  illustration  printing  textuality  typography  visual culture 

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Gender and Early Modern Cartography

Posted By Camille Serchuk, Friday, April 21, 2017

How might attention to gender illuminate not only the allegorical margins, but also the production, patronage, and consumption of early modern cartography?

This session welcomes papers that investigate the intersections of cartography and gender in pictorial and textual form. Some questions that might be considered include: how did early modern notions of gender inform the iconography of the continents or the depiction of their inhabitants? How are we to understand the role of gender in anthropomorphic/gynomorphic maps? How might research into gendered spaces frame our understanding of cartographic display or spatial measurement? In the interplay of reader and text, how does gender animate cartographic literature? How do cartographic inscriptions define consumers and the consumption of cartography? Was gender a factor in cartographic production? How might gender have shaped the patronage of cartography by Elizabeth I and Catherine de’Medici? Especially welcome are papers that bring new images/objects/texts to light, or that offer new approaches to familiar ones.

Deadline for abstracts is Monday, May 22nd, 2017. Please submit your paper’s title, an abstract of no more than 150 words, keywords, and a very brief CV (300 words, max), with contact information to Camille Serchuk (serchukc1@southernct.edu).

Tags:  bodies  cartography  continents  femininity  gender  geography  mapping  maps  masculinity 

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Digital Latin Resources

Posted By Susanna de Beer, Thursday, April 20, 2017

As the discipline representative for Neo-Latin Literature I welcome individual papers or panels about Digital Text Resources of (Neo-) Latin Literature and related Digital Humanities projects. The aim would be to give an overview of existing resources and the state-of-the-art of this field when it comes to methodological and computational issues. We may also want to address sustainability, collaboration between the various projects and ways to facilitate the use of these resources for interdisciplinary research. Depending on the submissions, papers on these topics may be included either in more general Digital Humanities panels or panels about the place of Latin in Renaissance Studies.

Please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions or suggestions.

Please submit your paper proposal by 20 May to Susanna de Beer (s.t.m.de.beer@hum.leidenuniv.nl). Proposals must include the following:

  • your name, affiliation, email address
  • a paper title (15-word maximum)
  • abstract (150-word maximum) abstract guidelines
  • keywords
  • a very brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum). Prose bios will not be accepted. CV guidelines and models

Tags:  Digital Humanities  Interdisciplinarity  Latin  Neo-Latin 

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The Place of Latin in Renaissance Studies

Posted By Susanna de Beer, Thursday, April 20, 2017

As the discipline representative for Neo-Latin Literature I welcome individual papers or panels that consider the place of Latin in Renaissance Studies. Although Latin has of course always been an important aspect of Renaissance Studies, the last decades have seen an increase in studies that position itself explicitly in the field of Neo-Latin. How can we explain this shift? What does this mean for research and teaching in the field of (Neo-)Latin, which is often part of Classics?

Both general considerations and specific case-studies are welcome. Papers that consider the place of Latin in interdisciplinary Renaissance contexts (such as the relation between art and literature, or vernacular and Latin), and those that consider the place of Latin in Renaissance studies in University curricula would be especially interesting.

Please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions or suggestions.

Please submit your paper proposal by 20 May to Susanna de Beer (s.t.m.de.beer@hum.leidenuniv.nl). Proposals must include the following:

  • your name, affiliation, email address
  • a paper title (15-word maximum)
  • abstract (150-word maximum) abstract guidelines
  • keywords
  • a very brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum). Prose bios will not be accepted. CV guidelines and models

 

Tags:  Interdisciplinarity  Latin  Neo-Latin  Renaissance Studies  Teaching Neo-Latin 

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Giordano Bruno and the History of Philosophy: Sources, Context and Legacy

Posted By Paolo Rossini, Thursday, April 20, 2017

Bruno can claim to be the first thinker since antiquity to integrate a metaphysics, physics, psychology and ethics into an original, if unsystematically presented, philosophy, one that aspired to go beyond the reelaborations of Platonism, Aristotelianism or Scepticism within a Christian context that had hitherto prevailed. The outcome was a radical alternative to medieval and Renaissance interpretations of human nature, the cosmos and God. The panel invites proposals for papers that discuss Bruno's philosophy from this historical viewpoint, relating it to medieval and Renaissance currents of thought or to its reception in subsequent centuries or both.

The session will be organized by Paolo Rossini (Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore) and Dilwyn Knox (UCL); and will be sponsored by the RSA Philosophy Group, of which David Lines (Warwick University) is the discipline representative.

Proposals should include:

·      Title of the paper (15-words maximum)

·      Abstract (150-words maximum)

·      Keywords

·      Short CV (300-words maximum, including affiliation and contact information). Prose bios will not be consulted. CV guidelines and models

Proposals should be sent to Paolo Rossini (paolo.rossini@sns.it) and Dilwyn Knox (d.knox@ucl.ac.uk) by Wednesday, 31 May, 2017. 

This post has not been tagged.

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Cartography and the Early Modern Archive

Posted By Karen-edis Barzman, Sunday, April 16, 2017

The investment of sovereignties in mapping for the storage and delivery of geospatial information dates to the fifteenth century, when the Republic of Venice called for “true” representations of fortresses, towns, and contested borderlands in its territories (1460). While the intention was to be systematic, in Venice as elsewhere the development of a comprehensive cartographic archive was slow and uneven. This CfP invites submissions addressing the instrumental use of mapping in the management of the early modern state, with a focus on hand-drawn maps (from sketches to highly finished drawings with watercolor, silver, and gold leaf) intended for circulation in the inner chambers of state. Also of interest are three-dimensional models of territory or maps in relief. Topics may include techniques for the collection of data and mapping itself although primary interest is in the accommodation of maps in the archive, their relation to archival documents in text, their evolving modalities of representation as instruments of statecraft, the new forms of literacy they demanded, their end-users, and their employment in policy-making, urban planning, empire-building, waging war, diplomacy, and maintenance peace. Geographic focus is unrestricted; temporal limits, c. 1300-1700.

Submissions Guidelines                                    
Proposals should be for 20-minute papers and should include

  • a preliminary title for the paper
  • an abstract of 150 words
  • a 1-page CV, including current institutional affiliation(s)
  • current contact information

Submit your proposal to kbarzman@binghamton.edu by Wednesday, May 31, 2017. Subject line: “RSA – Cartography and the Early Modern Archive.”

Tags:  archive  borderlands  cartography  diplomacy  documents  drawings  empire-building  fortress  geospatial information  maps  peace  policy-making  sketches  state administration  territories  town  urban planning  war 

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Society for Medieval & Renaissance Philosophy (SMRP)

Posted By Donald F. Duclow, Friday, April 14, 2017

The Society for Medieval & Renaissance Philosophy invites proposals for papers on any area of Renaissance philosophy and its historiography.  Proposals on French Renaissance philosophy are especially welcome.  Proposals should include the author’s name, professional affiliation, and contact information; the paper’s title; a brief abstract (150 words or less); keywords; a brief curriculum vitae (300 words maximum) ; and any A/V requirements.  Send proposals to the SMRP’s organizers, Sean Erwin (SErwin@barry.edu) and Donald Duclow (donduclow@earthlink.net) by May 15.

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Tags:  philosophy 

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Between allegory and natural philosophy: rethinking Grotesques during the Renaissance

Posted By Damiano Acciarino, Wednesday, April 12, 2017
Updated: Wednesday, April 12, 2017

 The purpose of this structured session is to discuss various aspects of the conception and perception of grotesque paintings completed during the Renaissance, with a particular focus on the Counter-Reformation period. After the decrees on images approved by the Council of Trent (1563) and the publication of Gabriele Paleotti’s Discorso on sacred and profane images, the opponents and defenders of this artistic genre felt a clear and general need to confer upon it a new semantic approach. The effects of this dynamic, which manifested itself as a conflict between two different cultural ideologies rather than simply a divergence of aesthetic perspectives, were two-fold. On the one hand, it influenced the theoretical debates on grotesques, creating an extensive body of literature that attempted to explain their essence, with particular focus on their relationship with or distortion of nature. On the other hand, it also paved the way for the emergence and growth of innovative multifarious patterns which served as alternatives to the more conventional figurations.

 

Contributions in this general context on the subject of Renaissance grotesque paintings are welcomed, especially those which clearly demonstrate how these decorations were resemanticized in the erudite and artistic environments of the second half of the sixteenth century, not only in Italy but also the rest of Europe and other continents, where centrifugal re-interpretations could blossom freely and far from traditional representations.

 

Please submit your paper proposal by no later than 10 May 2017 to Damiano Acciarino (damiano.acciarino@unive.it). Each proposal must include the following details:

  •   Name, university, email address
  •   Paper title
  •   Abstract (250-word maximum) 
  •   Keywords
  •   A very brief curriculum vitae (150-word maximum)

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Technologies of War

Posted By Karen-edis Barzman, Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Papers may take a literal or figurative approach to “technologies of war.” Topics may include the machinery or mechanics of weaponry as well as the training and management of troops, from conscription and deployment to armed conflict, collection of booty, and returning in victory or defeat. Work is welcome on maritime infrastructures and modalities of war as well as war on land, including the military encampment in its material and spatial dimensions and the social relations peculiar to the logic that informed its late medieval and early modern instantiations. Also of interest are the discursive and/or embodied practices that constituted opposing forces as subaltern and inimical, from rallying songs to the subjection of prisoners and the mutilation of the bodies of fallen adversaries. Geographic focus is unrestricted; temporal limits, c. 1300-1700.

Submissions Guidelines                                    
Proposals should be for 20-minute papers and should include

  • a preliminary title for the paper
  • an abstract of 150 words
  • a 1-page CV, including current institutional affiliation(s)
  • current contact information

Submit your proposal to kbarzman@binghamton.edu by Wednesday, May 31, 2017.

Tags:  adversaries  arms  booty  conflict  conscription  deployment  encampment  enemy  machinery  maritime  material  prisoners  spatial  technologies  training  troops  war  weaponry 

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Magical Wearables in the Medieval and Early Modern World

Posted By Christina M. Squitieri, Sunday, April 9, 2017

From Jones and Stallybrass's Renaissance Clothing and the Materials of Memory (2000) to art historian Cordelia Warr's Dressing for Heaven (2010), to Patricia Lennox and Bella Mirabella's edited collection, Shakespeare and Costume (2015), the power of clothing on medieval and early modern subjects is being more thoroughly explored. This interdisciplinary panel is interested in the ways clothing, costume, and other articles, including wigs, false beards, and jewelry, had power to shape, transform, or otherwise exert material effects on the bodies who wore them. How do such "wearables" and/or their material effects relate to issues of (mis)recognition or identity creation, successful or otherwise? How do clothing, costuming, jewelry, and other material wearables speak to larger cultural issues, anxieties, or fulfillment, from the semiotics of stage or portraiture to questions of gender identity, race, religion, sexuality, or discussions of the afterlife? How does disguise, both on and off stage, also speak to the "magical" effects of clothing on the renaissance body? How are "wearables" used to exert force or power on the self and others, and how are they able to "transform" a person or object into someone (or something) else?

Papers are welcome from multiple fields, from 1300-1700, both in England and on the Continent.

Please send 150-word abstracts and brief CV (see RSA guidelines here) to Christina M. Squitieri, cms531@nyu.edu, by Monday, May 22nd.

Tags:  bodies  clothing  costume  enchantment  identity  jewelry  magic  recognition  transformation  wearables  wigs 

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