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Virtue Ethics and Renaissance Neoplatonism
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Conference organized by The Centre for Neoplatonic Virtue Ethics University of Copenhagen, South Campus October 11-12, 2012

10/11/2012 to 10/12/2012
When: 11-12 October 2012
Where: University of Copenhagen
Copenhagen
Denmark
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Programme

Thursday, October 11

Workshop at 10:00 — 13:00, in lecture room 24.0.07. Maximum 15 participants, including the presenters

10:00 — 10:45 Michael J. B. Allen presents the following material for discussion:

• Plotinus, Ennead I.2, in id., Enneads, 7 vols, Greek and English text, trans. A. H. Armstrong. Cambridge, Mass.,: Harvard University Press, 1966-1988 (Loeb series), vol. 1, pp. 126-147.

10:45 — 11:00 Coffee break

11:00 — 11:45 Leo Catana presents the following material for discussion:

• Marsilio Ficino, De amore IV.2, IV.5 and VI.18, ed. Laurens. Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 2002, pp. 69, 77, 79, 83, 199, 201 (extracts).

• Marsilio Ficino, Epistula 115, in Ficino, Lettere, ed. Gentile (1990), pp. 207-210 (extract).

• Marsilio Ficino’s letter to Paolo Orlandini (dated 1496), in Ficino, The Philebus Commentary, Latin text and English translation by M. J. B. Allen. Tempe, Arizona: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2000, pp. 486-488.

11:45 — 12:00 Coffee break

12:00 — 12:45 Dilwyn Knox presents the following material for discussion:

Marsilio Ficino, De amore IV.5.

12:45 — 13:00 Discussion across the material presented, chaired by Christopher Celenza

13:00 — 14:40 Lunch in the refectory, building 23, balcony

Papers at 15:00 — 17:00, in lecture room 22.0.11. Chaired by Dilwyn Knox. Open to all

15:00 — 15:45 Michael J. B. Allen, ‘Ficinian Virtue: Figs, Hercules, Moses’

15:45 – 16:00 Coffee break

16:00 — 16:45 Leo Catana, ‘Anti-Platonism in Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Northern Europe: Its Significance to our Understanding of Renaissance Neoplatonism and its Virtue Ethics’

16:45 — 17:00 Reception, outside 22.0.11. All are welcome.

Friday, October 12

Workshop at 9:00 — 12:00, in lecture room 24.0.07. Maximum 15 participants, including the presenters

10:00 — 10:45 Christopher S. Celenza presents the following material for discussion:

Marsilio Ficino, In Philebum 25, in id., The Philebus Commentary, Latin text and English translation by M. J. B. Allen. Tempe, Arizona: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2000, pp. 230-237, 542-543.

Marsilio Ficino, Epistulae, in id., Opera omnia (1576). Anastatic reprint: Id., Opera omnia, 2 vols. Turin: Bottega d’Erasmo, 1962, vol. 1, pp. 936-937.

Marsilio Ficino, Theologia platonica XVIII.12, in id., Platonic theology, 6 vols, Latin text edited by J. Hankins, English translation by M. J. B. Allen. Cambridge, Mass., and London: Harvard University Press, 2000-2006, vol. 6, pp. 216-219, 314-315. (I Tatti Renaissance Library)

10:45 — 11:00 Coffee break

11:00 — 11:45 Anna Corrias presents the following material for discussion:

Marsilio Ficino, In Plotinum III.4.3. Basel: Petrus Perna, 1580.

11:45 — 12:00 Coffee break

12:00 — 12:45 Jill Kraye presents the following material for discussion:

Cristoforo Landino, Disputationum Camaldulensium liber primus: De vita contemplativa et activa, in id., Camaldulensian Disputations, ed. and transl. by J. Kraye. Cambridge, Mass., and London: Harvard University Press (forthcoming). (I Tatti Renaissance Library).

12:45 — 13:00 Discussion across the material presented, chaired by Michael J. B. Allen

13:00 — 14:40 Lunch in the refectory, building 23, balcony

Papers at 15:00 — 17:00, in lecture room 22.0.11. Chaired by Jill Kraye. Open to all

15:00 — 15:45 Anna Corrias, ‘"What, then, is a Nobly Good Man?”: Plotinus and Marsilio Ficino on the Tutelary Spirit and the Soul’s Free Will’

15:45 — 16:00 Coffee break

16:00 — 16:45 Christopher S. Celenza, ‘What "Counted” as Philosophy in the Italian Renaissance?The History of Philosophy, the History of Science, and Styles of Life’

16:45 — 17:00 Reception, outside 22.0.11. All are welcome.

How to find the Conference

The workshops will take place in lecture room 24.0.07 (building 24, ground floor, room 24). The papers will take place in lecture room 22.0.11 (building 22, ground level, room 11). These lecture rooms are located at the University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Humanities, Emil Holms Kanal, 2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark. The easiest access to these two buildings is by bus (line 12, 33, 34) or metro (lease see http://intl.m.dk/#!/). If you go there by metro, you should get off at ‘Islands Brygge’ or ‘DR Byen, Universitetet’. For a map of the campus, please see http://cms.ku.dk/hum-sites/hum-sites/Billeder/kuakort_en.pdf/. For the Centre for Neoplatonic Virtue Ethics, please see http://www.virtueethics.ku.dk.

Participation in the Workshops

If you wish to participate in the workshops, please register in advance, no later than September 28. There is a limit to the number of people participating, namely 15, and participants will be registered on a first come first basis, though PhD students will be given priority. For registration, please contact Leo Catana: catana@hum.ku.dk. There is a reader available for those participateing in the workshops. The reader comprises primary sources to be discussed by all participants during the workshops. Most of these sources are presented in Latin, though there will be English translations available to some of the texts, though not all.

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