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Rhumblines and Islands: A Cartographic Evening at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library of Columbia
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This mini-exhibition, organized for attendees of the RSA’s annual conference by Phillip John Usher (Barnard College, Columbia University) and Consuelo Dutschke (Columbia University, Rare Book & Manuscript Library), will feature a selection of the geographic and cartographic treasures from Columbia University’s Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

3/27/2014
When: Thursday, 27 March
6:30 PM — 8:30 PM
Where: Columbia University Rare Book & Manuscript Library
535 West 114th St.
6th Floor East Butler Library
New York, New York  10027
United States
Presenter: Phillip John Usher and Consuelo Dutschke


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Rhumblines and Islands: A Cartographic Evening at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library of Columbia University
Thursday, March 27, 6:30-8:30 PM

This mini-exhibition, organized for attendees of the RSA’s annual conference by Phillip John Usher (Barnard College, Columbia University) and Consuelo Dutschke (Columbia University, Rare Book & Manuscript Library), will feature a selection of the geographic and cartographic treasures from Columbia University’s Rare Book & Manuscript Library. The items selected for display allow a glimpse at the evolution of cartography and spatial understanding stretching approximately from medieval T-O maps to various forms of sixteenth-century and early-seventeenth-century "modern” maps. In addition to twelfth- and fifteenth- century editions of Isidore de Seville’s Etymologia, alongside Renaissnce editions of Ptolemy’s Geographia (1519), Sebastian Münster’s Cosmographia (1554—copy held by UTS) the isolario of Tommaso Porcacchi, a number of lesser-discussed items will be on view: a late sixteenth-century portolan chart by Giovanni Oliva; an edition of Bartolomeo Marliani’s Topographia antiquae Romae (1534), edited by François Rabelais; a French translation of Jan Huygen van Linschoten, Histoire de la navigation de Iean Hugues de Linschot Hollandois, aux Indes Orientales (1619); and others. Items have been selected to represent certain key (and sometimes curious) moments in the history of cartography, a history which is proving ever more essential across the disciplines of Renaissance Studies thanks to the work of a growing number of scholars. For questions about the event, please contact Phillip John Usher at pusher@barnard.edu.

Cost: Free

Limit: 35 participants

Please note that due to the limited number of tour tickets, conference attendees may register for only one of the tours offered at the 2014 New York Annual Meeting.

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