Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Sign In   |   Register
Venice and Aristotle (c. 1450–c. 1600): From Greek and Latin to the Vernacular
Tell a Friend About This EventTell a Friend
 

This exhibition (the first on Aristotle in Venice in over 50 years) will take place in the Sale Monumentali of the Marciana Library in Venice (access via the Museo Correr). The object is to illustrate the role that Venice played in the study and dissemination of Aristotle’s works in the Renaissance, as well as the linguistic interaction between works in Greek, Latin and (especially) vernacular.

4/21/2016 to 5/17/2016
When: Thursday, April 21, 2016
Where: Sale Monumentali, Marciana Library
Piazzetta S. Marco, 7
Venice, Veneto  30124
Italy
Contact: David A. Lines

« Go to Upcoming Event List  

This exhibition (the first on Aristotle in Venice in over 50 years) will take place in the Sale Monumentali of the Marciana Library in Venice (access via the Museo Correr). A brief description is available online.

The origins of this event go back to a project on ‘Vernacular Aristotelianism in the Italian Renaissance’ previously funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and to the excellent work of our then-research fellow Dr Eugenio Refini. The present exhibition owes its realization to Dr Alessio Cotugno, Marie Curie Research Fellow here at Warwick, who is co-editing the exhibition catalogue with David Lines and is also working closely with Warwick's team on an ERC Starting Grant on ‘Aristotle in the Italian Vernacular’ (More Info).

We will be displaying around 37 manuscript and printed works (the catalogue will include some 42) in one of the most magnificent rooms of the Museo Correr—also known as the Sala Sansoviniana. The object is to illustrate the role that Venice played in the study and dissemination of Aristotle’s works in the Renaissance, as well as the linguistic interaction between works in Greek, Latin and (especially) vernacular. There will be a book launch on 6 May: in addition to the catalogue, this event will also present the recent collection of essays ‘Aristotele fatto volgare’. Tradizione aristotelica e cultura volgare nel Rinascimento, edited by Eugenio Refini and David Lines. That event will see the presence, not only of Pietro B. Rossi, Francesco Bruni, and the director of the Biblioteca Marciana (Maurizio Messina), but also of several members of the previous AHRC project, including Jill Kraye and Luca Bianchi, and of course of the present ERC team. The public is warmly invited to attend.

Membership Software Powered by YourMembership  ::  Legal