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News and Announcements: Calls for Papers

CfP Shakespeare and Africa

Tuesday, September 13, 2016   (0 Comments)

This anniversary issue of 'Cahiers Shakespeare en devenir', an online peer-reviewed journal, would like to explore the relationship between Elizabethan and Jacobean drama, that of Shakespeare but also his contemporaries, and the representation of Africa, or, from a contextual viewpoint, the perception of the African continent in early modern England. The issue will also discuss 19th-21st c. re-writings, appropriations and adaptations of Shakespeare by African and African-American writers, stage directors and film directors.

Proposals may discuss, among other issues:
- The perception of the African continent in early modern England (in history, cartography, or history of ideas); the appropriation, discussion or rejection of foreign texts on/from Africa, as that of Leo Africanus (translated in 1600 as A Geographical Historie of Africa).
- Africa and African culture represented in drama by Shakespeare and his contemporaries.
- Rewritings of Shakespeare and his contemporaries by black writers: appropriations and distortions of the canonical texts, changes of focus and viewpoints, prequels and sequels, as, for example, Aimé Césaire’s Une Tempête, Djanet’s Sears’ Harlem Duet, Toni Morrison’s Desdemona, etc. Or more sporadic or indirect appropriations of Shakespearean elements by, for example, South-African writers like John M. Coetzee, Geoffrey Haresnape or Nadine Gordimer.
- 19th-21st century performances of early modern plays or their later rewritings in Africa, in French-speaking, Arabic-speaking, English-speaking, Portuguese-speaking countries; screen adaptations such as Alexander Abela’s Makifebo or Youssef Chahine’s Alexandria Trilogy.
- Performances (outside of Africa) by African-American companies. For example, Orson Welles’ 1936 voodoo Macbeth at the Federal Theatre; Brett Bailey’s transposition of Verdi’s Macbeth to the Congo and the Congolese regime; Toni Morrison’s Desdemona with Malian singer Rokia Traoré; work by the African-American Shakespeare Company in San Francisco, etc.

Completed papers, in English or in French, should be sent by late April 2017 along with an abstract, a contributor’s bio and a list of keywords, to Yan Brailowsky and Pascale Drouet:

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