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History CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
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This blog is for CfPs for sessions in history for RSA 2019 Toronto. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Top tags: social history  early modern  history  literature  gender  material culture  patronage  Religion  renaissance  urban spaces  architecture  art  art history  book history  devotion  history of science  identity  ritual  catholic reform early modern  charity  classicism  confraternity  cultural history  digital humanities  environmental history  global  history of reading  interdisciplinary  philosophy  piety 

Violence and Trauma in the Early Modern World

Posted By Colin S. Rose, Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Call for Papers for RSA 2019: Violence and Trauma in the Early Modern World

 

Recent historiography has stressed the centrality of violence to early modern history. Interpersonal violence, state violence and military violence have all come under scrutiny for the ways that violence shaped lived experiences and disrupted civil society. This panel seeks to expand on this growing school of thought by asking: how did the trauma wrought by violence and crisis change people’s perspectives on the world around them? Were people inured to its impact, were they fascinated by the danger in their streets, were they deeply troubled by the instability of the world around them? This is an interdisciplinary call for proposals for papers for RSA 2019 Toronto dealing with any aspect of violence and trauma in the early modern world. Papers may address history, literature, art, philosophy or any combination of disciplines present at the RSA in order to build a productive interdisciplinary conversation.

 

Please send:

  • paper title (15-word maximum)
  • abstract (150-word maximum)
  • curriculum vitae (.pdf or .doc upload)
  • PhD completion date (past or expected)
  • full name, current affiliation, and email address

 

to Colin Rose (crose@brocku.ca) by AUGUST 5th 2018

Tags:  history  interdisciplinary  trauma  violence 

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Illustrated Album Amicorum

Posted By Margaret F. Rosenthal, Tuesday, July 24, 2018

 

CALL for PAPERS: This panel is proposed for the annual Renaissance Conference of Southern California (March 10, 2019) at the Huntington Library.

Illustrated Alba Amicorum

The illustrated album amicorum (album of friends) is a singular visual example of early-modern travelers’ fascination with swiftly-changing fashions, regional customs, family lineage, and manuscript decoration. It preserves depictions of dress, local scenes of work and entertainment, modes of transportation, festivals, games, and civic rituals, and reveals major changes in fashionable and luxurious clothing and accessories. Uniting the printed book and the illustrated manuscript to transmit knowledge and thinking across early-modern Europe, it was often a luxury object in and of itself, thereby materializing within its pages an expanding world economy. Other important uses of the album amicorum were as modes of philosophical thought;  testaments to friendship; a locus where university students could freely use and manipulate the visual to reflect on serious philosophical questions outside of the classroom setting; and a vehicle for provoking laughter and pleasure. A fluid genre allowing for the coexistence of different visual genres (prints, emblems, frontispieces, fashion and costume plates) within its pages, this panel invites papers that will broaden our understanding further about its multiple uses during the early-modern period.

As per RSA guidelines, paper proposals should include the following: paper title (15-word maximum), abstract (150-word maximum), a few keywords, and a very brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum). Please send to session organizer Margaret (Tita) Rosenthal (mrosenth@usc.edu) by August 5, 2018.  

Tags:  book illustration  fashion  friendship  illustrated manuscripts  philosophy  university students  world economy 

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Printing, Reception, Editing, and Teaching Thomas More and Early Humanists

Posted By Emily A. Ransom, Tuesday, July 24, 2018

The Amici Thomae Mori is excited to welcome proposals for papers on Thomas More studies to coincide with the publication of the new Essential Works of Thomas More (Yale University Press, 2019).  This single-volume, accessible, readable edition will be the third major collection of More’s works in nearly five hundred years, after the 1557 Workes published by More’s nephew William Rastell and the Yale Complete Works in fifteen volumes completed in 1997. Though papers on all areas of Thomas More studies will be considered, the Amici is especially interested in topics that will complement this important publication, such as print history of humanist texts, reception history of Thomas More and early humanists, editing humanist texts, and teaching humanist texts in the modern classroom.

 

To submit a paper, please send your title (15-word max), abstract (150-word max), a few keywords, CV, PhD completion date (past or expected), and affiliation to Emily Ransom (ransome@uwgb.edu) by August 10, 2018.  

Tags:  book history  catholic reform early modern  classical reception  classicism  devotion  early modern  history  history of reading  pedagogy  political history  print culture  printers  Religion  religious communities  renaissance  theology 

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CFP -- Hagiography Society

Posted By Alison K. Frazier, Friday, July 20, 2018
Updated: Friday, July 20, 2018

HAGIOGRAPHY SOCIETY

Call for Paper, Panel, and Roundtable Proposals

Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting

Toronto 17-19 March 2019

DEADLINE EXTENDED!!!

The HAGIOGRAPHY SOCIETY invites proposals from all academic disciplines for the Toronto 2019 meeting of the Renaissance Society of America. We welcome individual papers, full panels (normally three papers, with a session chair and an optional respondent), and roundtable discussions (normally five-eight presenters).

Any topic that intersects with “sanctity in the Renaissance” is welcome: shrines, liturgies, relics, processions, miracles, laude, legendae, vitae and re-writings, sculptural and frescoed vitae. We welcome innovative approaches to the varied types of sanctity: political saints, family saints, aspiring saints, heretical saints, child saints, pilgrim saints, healing saints, warrior saints. We especially invite papers that examine saints beyond Europe, that explore holy gender beyond the binary, and that take up “Renaissance medievalism” as expressed in hagiographic revisions.

As an Associate Organization of the RSA, HS may field as many as four panels. Sponsorship of a panel by the AAR-SOF normally means that the panel will be accepted by the RSA Program Committee without further vetting, provided the panels comply with the RSA guidelines.

Proposals should include all the information listed in the RSA Submission Guidelines here: http://www.rsa.org/page/2019SubmissionsGuide#proposalcomponents .

Note the restricted length of proposals. Incomplete proposals will not be considered.

Everyone who presents at the annual meeting must be a member of RSA at the time of the meeting: http://www.rsa.org/page/2019SubmissionsGuide#membership .

Proposals should be sent to Alison Frazier (akfrazier@austin.utexas.edu) and Barbara Zimbalist  (bezimbalist@utep.edu) by 5 August 2018.

Anyone whose proposal is not accepted for the HS-RSA panels will be informed in time to submit as an individual. Please note, though, that those submissions will be evaluated by the Program Committee of the RSA.

Tags:  gender  global  hagiography  liturgy  re-writing  saint  sanctity  shrine 

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Embodying Value: Representing Money in the Early Modern Period

Posted By Natasha Seaman, Friday, July 20, 2018

Call for Papers – Deadline Extended

Embodying Value: Representing Money in the Early Modern Period

Joanna Woodall and Natasha Seaman, co-organizers

As media of exchange, coins were essential to trade and economic development in the early modern period. Their double-sided form and the precious materials from which they were made had deep resonance in European culture and beyond. The efficacy of coins depended on faith in their inherent value, yet they were subject to debasement and counterfeiting.  This session seeks papers that explore the signifying potential of money in works of art and how abstract concepts of value intersect with and are figured in material and monetary forms. While the art market may have some relevance to this subject, papers selected will have as their primary focus the particular character of coins and other means of exchange as physical and semiotic entities, money as it appears within images and texts, and how concepts of money and currency can inform our understanding of works of art in this period.

This is a continuation our 2017 sessions on the same topic. Abstracts submitted will also be considered for inclusion in an edited volume.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to

Depictions of coins in exchange, gifts, or theft

Represented coins in still lifes and kunstkammers

Coins as metaphors in literature

Coins and the production of knowledge

Counterfeiting and debasement in works of art

Coins in relation to portrait medals, seals, or pilgrimage badges

Coins and the Eucharist and/or Incarnation

The materiality, design, and production of coins in relation to their value and use

Assertions of value in bills of exchange

Coins and the material mechanisms of exchange with the New World

Please send proposals to Natasha Seaman (nseaman@ric.edu) and Joanna Woodall (Joanna.Woodall@courtauld.ac.uk) by Friday, July 27, 2018.

As per RSA guidelines, proposals should include the following: paper title (15-word maximum), abstract (150-word maximum), keywords, and a very brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum). See http://www.rsa.org/?page=submissionguidelines#CfP

Download File (PDF)

Tags:  coins  currency  metals 

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Defining Space: Walls and Cities in the Early Modern World

Posted By Luis J. Gordo Pelaez, Thursday, July 19, 2018

Walls have been an omnipresent feature of human settlements since ancient times. Even today they continue to be apart of our daily life and discourse, whether for politically driven purposes (i.e. US border “security”) or satyr (i.e. the now defunk website, Bricking it for Canada). Whether ancient or contemporary, walls have contributed to defining and redefining spaces, creating a sense of place and identity, demarcating physical boundaries, and imposing socio-economic hierarchies of inclusion and exclusion. In the context of early modern cities, walls experienced a resurgence as a consequence, among others, of expanding empires and colonizing efforts, the development of warfare technology and new systems of fortification, and the implementation of directives regarding the distribution and use of urban space. Whether materialized or not (Richard Kagan has examined their absence in inland colonial Spanish America), walls were a common occurrence in the schemes of early modern urban theorists and planners, and a frequent instrument of discussion in the political and socio-economic plans of absolute regimes, particularly in foreign dominions. For better or worse, walls have maintained their relevance. Framed by contemporary understandings of walls, this session aims to examine the relationship between cities and walls during the early modern era from a global comparative perspective. Papers that interrogate this interplay in any of its manifestations (conceptualization and building, notions of agency and perception associated with these infrastructures, the dichotomy inside/outside, narrative and graphic representation, and materiality) during the period 1300-1700 are particularly welcome to this comparative panel. 

 

Please send paper titles (15-word max.); abstracts (150-word max.); brief CVs; PhD competition date (past or expected); full name, current affiliation, and e-mail address to organizers (Cody Barteet, cbarteet@uwo.ca; and Luis Gordo-Peláez, luisgordopelaez@csufresno.edu) by August 8, 2018. Submission guidelines are available at https://www.rsa.org/page/2019SubmissionsGuide .

Tags:  architecture  art  art history  city  cultural history  early modern  history  identity  literature  material culture  representation  seventeenth century  sixteenth century  social history  urban spaces  urban studies  urbanism  walls 

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Jesuit Studies

Posted By Kathleen M. Comerford, Thursday, July 19, 2018
The Journal of Jesuit Studies is looking to organize panels in any aspect of Jesuit studies in any region, up to the year 1700, to include history, literature, art history, music history, or related topics, in all geographical areas.

Individual paper abstracts should be no more than 150 words and should identify up to 5 keywords.  Panel submissions should include the name of a chair who is not also a presenter.  All submissions must include a/v requests and a brief CV (including affiliation, date of PhD completion, general discipline area, rank, and publications or other evidence of scholarship) for each participant.  Please submit to Kathleen Comerford, kcomerfo@georgiasouthern.edu, no later than August 5, 2018.  We will consider panels, individual papers, and roundtables for sponsorship by the Journal of Jesuit Studies.  Sponsorship does not guarantee acceptance to the program and implies no intent to publish.

Tags:  academies  architecture  book history  charity  classicism  community  cultural history  devotion  digital humanities  dress history; economic history; fashion; working-  early modern  empire  ethnographies  global  history  history of reading  history of science  identity  Jesuits  patronage  philosophy  Religion  ritual  social history  the other  theology  urban spaces 

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Deadline extended - Rebranding Renaissance Art History and Studies for the Twenty-First Century

Posted By Anne H. Muraoka, Tuesday, July 17, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, July 24, 2018

"New needs new techniques. And the modern artists have found new ways and new means of making their statements...the modern painter cannot express this age, the airplane, the atom bomb, the radio, in the old forms of the Renaissance or of any other past culture." - Jackson Pollock

Although written during the infancy of modernism in the United States, Pollock's words still reverberate within the walls of academia. The significance of understanding the past for the purposes of progress in all areas of knowledge have served as fodder for academics, art historians, critics, intellectuals, and even artists. Many universities, both large and small, are shifting the balance of the study of the Renaissance toward favoring the modern and contemporary. In recent years, Renaissance art history and studies have been characterized as "old school" and irrelevant in the modern world. The Humanities, once pioneered and dominated by Renaissance scholars such as Jacob Burkhardt, Heinrich Wölfflin, Erwin Panofsky, Aby Warburg, among others, is today seen as a golden age long past.

The Humanities is measureless and defies definition, as it centers upon the human experience, social and cultural transformation, the quest for knowledge, and individual and collective curiosity. Renaissance studies embody these very pursuits by making connections between art, religion, social history, economics, politics, and even anthropology. Yet, we all have heard these questions from students and even our peers:

- "Why should I study Renaissance art, history, and literature if I intend to specialize in the modern/contemporary?"

- "How can studying Renaissance art contribute to my development as a practicing artist in the twenty-first century?"

- "How can Renaissance studies inform how I view and understand the modern world?"

- "What are the transferable skills obtained through the study of the Renaissance that would benefit me in a discipline or profession outside of art and the Humanities?"

This session aims to: 1) acknowledge the contributions of Renaissance art history and studies in understanding the modern world; 2) introduce and generate new avenues of research in Renaissance art and studies for the twenty-first century; 3) explore new methodologies in teaching Renaissance art and studies, among other related topics.

Paper proposals must include the following:

     Paper title (15-word maximum)

     Abstract (150-word maximum)

     Brief CV (300-word maximum)

     PhD completion date (past or expected)

     Full name, current affiliation, and e-mail address.

Please submit proposals to Anne H. Muraoka (amuraoka@odu.edu) and Marcia B. Hall (marciahall713@gmail.com) by 8 August 2018.

Tags:  image  Renaissance art history  Renaissance culture  Renaissance literature  Renaissance studies  text  visual culture 

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Mobility and the Renaissance City

Posted By Saundra L. Weddle, Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Mobility and the Renaissance City

The exploration, economic development, and cross-cultural exchange that have come to be associated with the Renaissance played out not only across territories, but also in local contexts, where transient individuals co-existed alongside a permanent population.  Identification as an outsider was just one possible characterization of such an individual, who may also have been a migrant, pilgrim, merchant, tourist, artist, builder, ambassador, or refugee, and whose presence made many Renaissance cities places of flux and diversity. The ensuing social dynamics had important implications for urban identity and found expression through formal and informal engagement with the built environment, which could hinder or encourage mobility and cross-cultural contact. This panel, sponsored by the European Architectural History Network, invites abstracts addressing topics such as:

-       Urban theories and practices relating to urban infrastructure, including walls, gates, and porticoes

-       the creation of ghettos and quarantines

-       funduqs and fondachi

-       extra-urban outposts and intra-urban nodes, such as inns, taverns, hostels, and lodging houses

-       cartographic strategies associated with the identification of outsiders and/or dominant groups

-       places of worship and other identifying institutions, like scuole, in their urban contexts

Abstracts are invited from any discipline but should engage the built environment’s role in preventing, controlling, encouraging, and/or accommodating mobility during the time period 1350 to 1750, and within any geographic context. Please send proposals via email with the subject line RSA 2019 to Saundra Weddle (sweddle@drury.edu ) and Elizabeth Merrill at (emerrill@mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de)The proposal should include a title (15 words max.); an abstract (200 words max.), a one-paragraph CV (in prose, 200 words max.), along with keywords, full name, current affiliation, and email address ) by August 5, 2018. Submission guidelines are available at https://www.rsa.org/page/2019SubmissionsGuide .

 

This post has not been tagged.

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Renaissance Vegetarianism - Deadline Extended

Posted By Andrea Crow, Monday, July 16, 2018

The study of early modern food has blossomed in recent years. As scholars have parsed the politics of changing dining practices, the role of recipes in intellectual history, and the growing perception of food ethics as inextricable from social identity, dietary beliefs and habits have begun to be seen as central to early modern studies. One of the most striking dietary trends that spread across Europe in this period, however, remains underexamined: the rise of vegetarianism.


This panel invites papers from across disciplines that examine Renaissance vegetarianism in order to think through the intertwining religious, economic, political, and ethical motives that spurred this transnational movement forward. Possible topics might include views on vegetarianism in the early modern dietary sciences, radical vegetarian leaders and the communities that they organized, vegetarian cuisine and recipe books, the revival of Classical vegetarian thought, or the representation of vegetarianism in literature and the arts.


Proposals should include the presenter’s name, academic affiliation, email address, paper title (15 words maximum), abstract (150 words maximum), and CV (300 words maximum). Please submit proposals by August 1st to Andrea Crow (andrea.crow@bc.edu).

Tags:  Art History  ethics  food studies  interdisciplinary  literature  political history  recipe books  vegetarianism 

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