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History CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
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This blog is for CfPs for sessions in history for RSA 2019 Toronto. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Top tags: social history  early modern  history  literature  gender  material culture  patronage  Religion  renaissance  urban spaces  architecture  art  art history  book history  devotion  history of science  identity  ritual  catholic reform early modern  charity  classicism  confraternity  cultural history  digital humanities  environmental history  global  history of reading  interdisciplinary  philosophy  piety 

CFP RSA 2018: The Networks of Non-Elite Women in Early Modern Societies

Posted By Marlee Couling, Wednesday, June 20, 2018

CFP, RSA 2019 (Toronto, 17-19 March 2019)

"Friends, Neighbours, Allies: The Networks of Non-Elite Women in Early Modern Societies"

An ever-richer scholarship has explored the social relationships and cultural collaborations of literate and elite early modern women. This panel seeks to broaden our understanding of homosocial networks to include working, poor, and marginalized women between 1500-1700. Representations drawn from literary texts, visual imagery, and archival sources are welcome.

 

Themes of interest might include: the role of gender in female networks; relationships between peers or across social categories such as mistress and servant; meanings of friendship among plebeian women; emotions, especially empathy; instrumentality and collaboration; material exchanges; and coping strategies, including the illegal.

 

Papers about a mix of geographical and cultural settings will advance discussion of similarities and differences in the same-sex relationships of early modern women.

 

Elizabeth Cohen (York University), collaborating on this CFP, will chair the panel.

 

Please email paper proposals, including a title and abstract of 100-150 words, as well as a one-page C.V. (300 words) to Marlee Couling (marleej@yorku.ca) by Friday, July 20, 2018.

Tags:  community  early modern  friends  gender  plebeian  social history  women 

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Re-assessing the Early Modern Court: Connection, Negotiation and Transgression

Posted By Maria Maurer, Wednesday, June 20, 2018

2019 will mark the 50th anniversary of the publication of Norbert Elias’ The Court Society, which placed the early modern court at the center of a long civilizing process wherein the king exercised social control over and imposed emotional restraint upon his courtiers. While his methods and conclusions remain contested, Elias called attention to the role of the court in both early modern and modern society. Since the publication of The Court Society scholarship on the court has proliferated, yet we still tend to treat the court as a closed and controlled system with elaborate means of monitoring behavior and excluding outsiders.

This panel seeks to break open the early modern court by focusing on the court as a point of contact rather than a realm of separation. We welcome papers that examine relationships between courts and courtiers, as well as those that analyze the intermingling of social strata or connections between the court and civic or religious authorities. The panel also seeks to illuminate the ways in which fields such as critical gender, race, and sexuality studies and transnational studies have changed the ways in which we approach the court. What roles did servants and slaves play at court? How did courts function in non-European contexts, and what effects did international trade, diplomacy and colonization have upon court structures?

Given the re-birth of a small, but extremely wealthy and politically influential class in the 21st century, the 2019 meeting of RSA offers us a chance to re-assess our approaches to the early modern court and its continued relevance in our contemporary society.

Paper topics might include, but are not limited to, the following:

- Relationships between or among court centers (European and/or non-European)

- Colonial courts and relationships between indigenous rulers and colonizers

- Social climbing or disfavor at court

- Negotiations of courtly strictures; this might include transgressing or stretching rules governing ritual, etiquette, gender, and the use or abuse of court positions, as well as violence, theft or other unsanctioned behaviors

- Laudatory and/or satirical representations of the court and its members

- The roles of servants and/or slaves as social or cultural agents

- Contacts between courts and civic or religious organizations

Please send an abstract of 300 words, paper title and a brief curriculum vitae to Maria Maurer (maria-maurer@utulsa.edu) by 20 July 2018. Selected panelists will be asked to shorten their abstracts and paper titles to conform with RSA guidelines by 10 August 2018.

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Kircher’s World

Posted By Thomas Beachdel, Friday, June 15, 2018
Updated: Friday, June 15, 2018

Call For Papers

Renaissance Society of America

Annual Conference, March 17-19, 2019, Toronto, Canada

Kircher’s World

This panel invites papers on the work, influence, or problematization of the seventeenth-century polymath, Athanasius Kircher (1602-1680). A category defying figure caught between the encyclopaedism of the Renaissance and the turn toward specialized knowledge, Kircher has not received the attention of his more “scientific” contemporaries, such as Kepler or Newton, and is often regarded as an outside figure, given his penchant for the arcane, the mysterious, and his adherence to the Hermetic tradition, despite the work of Copernicus. At the same time, the vast outpouring of Kircher’s work on a broad range of subjects—Egyptian civilization and hieroglyphs (Oedipus Aegyptiacus), music (Musurgia Universalis), China (China Monumentis), geology (Mundus Subterraneus)—was extremely influential to a wide audience during his lifetime. Of particular interest are papers dealing with Kircher’s Mundus Subterraneus and the influence of this text and his viewpoint on geology, theories of the formation of the earth, and volcanism.

Session Chair: Thomas Beachdel, CUNY, Hostos

Please submit a short (max. 150 word) abstract and CV by July 31, 2018 to: thomas.beachdel@gmail.com

Tags:  art  book history  early modern  history of science  print culture  renaissance 

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National Histories and Historical Nationalisms

Posted By Kelsey Ihinger, Wednesday, June 13, 2018

National Histories and Historical Nationalisms

 

In 1611, Spanish historian Luis Cabrera de Córdoba wrote the following about the author of histories: “escribe mejor el que no es natural de la provincia de quién hace historia” (“he who writes best is the man who is not native to the province whose history he tells”). To support this claim, Cabrera de Córdoba points to the famous Polydore Vergil, an Italian employed in writing the history of English kings. If the chronicle is meant to both portray historical events and celebrate a nation’s monarchy, can a foreign author more effectively achieve balance between truth and praise than a native historian? How does the depiction of history in other genres play with these same limits and what freedom exists within them to create or question the depiction of national history? The relationship between the historical genre and the creation of a coherent, regional, national, or imperial identity is the subject that this panel hopes to explore. Both history and nation are subjects that we will consider in their broadest and most multivalent senses. Historical subjects were treated in texts in many genres—from history plays, to chronicles, to broadside ballads—and nations both existed within smaller regions of a single monarchy’s territory and also stretched to the limits of its vast empire. By contemplating the connection that exists between various historical genres and concepts of nation and empire, this panel seeks to explore questions of how a cohesive identity was conceived of, created, fomented, or even dismantled in the early modern period. With attention paid to the context in which historical texts from various genres emerge, it is the hope of this panel that scholars from diverse disciplines and geographical areas of study will come together to discuss the questions posed by our theme.

 

Please send a 150-word abstract and a 300-word CV to Kelsey Ihinger (ihinger@wisc.edu). Proposals must be received by Friday, July 13. This panel will be sponsored by the Center for Early Modern Studies of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. 

Tags:  broadside  chronicle  empire  history play  nation 

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Deadline Extended: The Streets of Rome: Urbanism, Architecture, and the Social Sphere

Posted By Jasmine R. Cloud, Friday, June 8, 2018
Updated: Wednesday, August 1, 2018

A visit to twenty-first-century Rome still reveals the early modern moments that shaped its streets, piazze, and the experience of moving through them. The streets of Rome were sites of social exchange, provided opportunities to exert one’s will through building and destruction, witnessed sacred and secular processions, and functioned as places of devotion, among other things. As Joseph Connors noted, “To walk through Rome is to navigate through fields of influence that...buildings generate around themselves.” This session invites papers that examine the streets of the Caput Mundi, whether as the place for artistic and architectural activities or as physical, shifting spaces of the early modern city.


Themes might include: the manipulation of streets by public, private, or papal entities; the experience of moving through the streets of the city; buildings and their effect on the street or street system; how artistic communities shaped streets and neighborhoods; the streets as an organizational system for early modern documentation; depictions of streets; artists' and architects’ experiences of street life in Rome; and ephemeral or permanent monuments in the streets.


Please send title (15-word maximum), abstract (150-word maximum), keywords, and a brief CV (300 word maximum) to Jasmine Cloud (cloud@ucmo.edu) by August 5, 2018.


Tags:  architecture  Rome  social history  urban spaces  urbanism 

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Early Modern Eschatology

Posted By Victoria A. Yeoman, Friday, June 8, 2018
Updated: Wednesday, August 1, 2018

*Deadline extended to August 5th.

Papers are invited on any aspect of eschatology, providere novissima (“the foreseeing of the last things”), or the “last things” of human life and time: the moment of death, the final judgement and arrival of the new millennium, and the final destination of souls in heaven or hell. Of particular interest are papers related to early modern material and visual representations of the final events of human history, the destruction of the world, or the end of time. 

 

Papers might address topics such as:

·     Visual representations of the end of the world and/or the last things.

·     The role of visual or material culture in envisioning and contemplating the end of human life.

·     The materialization of eschatological ideologies in the early modern home.

·     Contemporary strains of eschatological thought in reformed culture.

·     Discussion of the final events of human history in sermons, devotional literature, emblem books, or imaginative literature.

·     Collection and display of images of the last things.

·     Centrality of art and materiality to understandings of eschatology.

·     The evolution of eschatological attitudes over time.

 

Submissions should be sent by July 16th to Victoria Yeoman (victoriayeoman025@gmail.com) and should include the following information:

·      a paper title (15-word maximum)

·      abstract (150-word maximum) 

·      a very brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum).

Tags:  material culture  piety  religion  ritual  social history 

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New Approaches to Catholic Reform

Posted By Marie Louise Lillywhite, Monday, June 4, 2018
Updated: Monday, June 4, 2018

Recently, scholars have approached Catholic Reform in new ways, by looking beyond Tridentine frameworks, extending beyond European borders, and challenging traditional arguments and understandings of this critical period in the history of the Church. Rather than focusing purely on a top-down enforcement of reform, or failed attempts to combat Protestantism, scholars of history, history of art, music, and literature have used new and varied approaches to understand the impact of religious reform in the early modern period and the ways in which people negotiated it.

The organizers of this panel would like to invite papers that consider Catholic Reform from across the disciplines, with the aim of contributing to a broader and more holistic understanding of the process, bringing together research from different fields and varied geographic locations. Papers might directly address new methods and approaches, or might demonstrate them through specific research, but all will contribute to a growing conversation on the nature and significance of Catholic Reform.

Potential topics could include:

-       Approaches to Catholic Reform broadly or within specific field/subfields

-       Reinterpretations of older arguments and narratives about Catholic Reform

-       The influence of Catholic Reform on music, literature, culture, politics, etc.

-       The influence of Catholic Reform on art and architecture (patronage, examples of censorship, debates concerning the nature of the sacred image)

-       Limitations of Reform

-       Reform in a global context

-       Reactions of the laity to Catholic Reform

Proposals should include the presenter’s name, academic affiliation (if applicable), email address, paper title (15 words maximum), abstract (150 words maximum) and brief academic CV (300 words maximum). Please submit proposals by July 20 to Marie-Louise Lillywhite (marie-louise.lillywhite@history.ox.ac.uk) and Celeste McNamara (c.mcnamara@warwick.ac.uk). Presenters will need to be members of the RSA by the time of the conference. The RSA offers a limited number of travel grants; see their website for more information. 

Tags:  catholic reform early modern  confraternity  patronage  social history 

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New Approaches to Catholic Reform

Posted By Marie Louise Lillywhite, Monday, June 4, 2018

CFP: New Approaches to Catholic Reform

RSA 2019 - Toronto

 

Recently, scholars have approached Catholic Reform in new ways, by looking beyond Tridentine frameworks, extending beyond European borders, and challenging traditional arguments and understandings of this critical period in the history of the Church. Rather than focusing purely on a top-down enforcement of reform, or failed attempts to combat Protestantism, scholars of history, history of art, music, and literature have used new and varied approaches to understand the impact of religious reform in the early modern period and the ways in which people negotiated it.

 

The organizers of this panel would like to invite papers that consider Catholic Reform from across the disciplines, with the aim of contributing to a broader and more holistic understanding of the process, bringing together research from different fields and varied geographic locations. Papers might directly address new methods and approaches, or might demonstrate them through specific research, but all will contribute to a growing conversation on the nature and significance of Catholic Reform.

 

Potential topics could include:

-       Approaches to Catholic Reform broadly or within specific field/subfields

-       Reinterpretations of older arguments and narratives about Catholic Reform

-       The influence of Catholic Reform on music, literature, culture, politics, etc.

-       The influence of Catholic Reform on art and architecture (patronage, examples of censorship, debates concerning the nature of the sacred image)

-       Limitations of Reform

-       Reform in a global context

-       Reactions of the laity to Catholic Reform

 

Proposals should include the presenter’s name, academic affiliation (if applicable), email address, paper title (15 words maximum), abstract (150 words maximum) and brief academic CV (300 words maximum). Please submit proposals by July 20 to Marie-Louise Lillywhite (marie-louise.lillywhite@history.ox.ac.uk) and Celeste McNamara (c.mcnamara@warwick.ac.uk). Presenters will need to be members of the RSA by the time of the conference. The RSA offers a limited number of travel grants; see their website for more information. 

Tags:  catholic reform early modern  environmental history 

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The Future and Futurity in Renaissance Europe

Posted By Nicholas S. Baker, Sunday, June 3, 2018

Organizers: Jeroen Puttevils (University of Antwerp) & Nicholas Scott Baker (Macquarie University)

How did women and men think about the future in Europe between the fourteenth and seventeenth centuries? The sixteenth-century French philosopher Michel de Montaigne already castigated his contemporaries for their obsession with the future in his Essais(Part 1, chapter XI). Montaigne argued that this was a futile pursuit, since one cannot control what will occur in the future. Moreover, an obsession about the future diverted attention from what required scrutiny in the present. 

In this session we are especially interested in how perceptions of the future related to actions in the (past) present. Did ideas about the future affect people making plans? Ideally, we’d like to have various social groups, their perceptions of the future and the actions motivated by their ideas about the future represented: merchants, diplomats, court astrologers, farmers, royals and state officials, craftsmen, churchmen… Recent research by the organizers of the session has shown the social nature of thinking about the future, both how ideas of the future are formed, and how they could differ along social profiles. Moreover, we hope to demonstrate the co-existence and interaction of various forms of future expectations in Renaissance European societies. This sessions seeks to test grand narratives such as those of Reinhart Koselleck (1979) and Lucian Hölscher (1999) on changes in thinking about the future (which are based on elite and canonical authors). We hope to attract papers analyzing original sources produced by the social groups mentioned above from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.

Paper proposals (and inquiries about this session) should be sent to Jeroen Puttevils, jeroen.puttevils@uantwerpen.be by 1 August 2018. The proposal should include: 1) a title; 2) abstract (150 words max.); 3) short CV (300 words max.); 4) list of five keywords; 5) indication of whether you have any audio / visual needs.

Tags:  Future  Renaissance  Temporality  Time 

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The Society for Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy Call for Papers RSA 2019

Posted By Sean D. Erwin, Friday, June 1, 2018

The Society for Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy will sponsor several panels at the 2019 annual meeting of the Renaissance Society of America in Toronto, March 17th to 19th, 2019.  We welcome proposals on any relevant theme, but we are especially interested in the following topics:

·           Medieval and Renaissance accounts of language.

·           The transmission of Medieval and Renaissance authors in Early Modernity.

·           Discussions of critical receptions of Medieval and Renaissance authors

and the interpretive effects these readings engendered.

·           Themes linked to work on Machiavelli and Lucretius and their transmission.

Please submit a paper title, abstract (150 words) and abbreviated CV (300 words) to Sean Erwin (Serwin@barry.edu) by Monday July 16th, 2018.  Papers should have a presentation length of twenty minutes or less and should be delivered in English.

 In line with RSA guidelines, presenters must have a PhD or other terminal degree or be an advanced dissertation candidate presenting on a topic derived from their current dissertation research.  For complete submission guidelines please see: https://www.rsa.org/page/2019SubmissionsGuide

Due to changes to the RSA conference planning schedule, Associate Organizations like the SMRP will not be notified of approved panels until November 1st, 2018.  The deadline for conference registration is December 15th, 2018.  Please note: to present at the RSA one must pay for RSA membership for the conference year in question. 

We would also ask that presenters consider becoming members of the SMRP.  To become a member visit http://smrpphil.org/ and click Membership.

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Tags:  early modern  medieval  philosophy  renaissance 

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