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History CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
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This blog is for CfPs for sessions in history for RSA 2019 Toronto. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Deadline extended - Rebranding Renaissance Art History and Studies for the Twenty-First Century

Posted By Anne H. Muraoka, Tuesday, July 17, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, July 24, 2018

"New needs new techniques. And the modern artists have found new ways and new means of making their statements...the modern painter cannot express this age, the airplane, the atom bomb, the radio, in the old forms of the Renaissance or of any other past culture." - Jackson Pollock

Although written during the infancy of modernism in the United States, Pollock's words still reverberate within the walls of academia. The significance of understanding the past for the purposes of progress in all areas of knowledge have served as fodder for academics, art historians, critics, intellectuals, and even artists. Many universities, both large and small, are shifting the balance of the study of the Renaissance toward favoring the modern and contemporary. In recent years, Renaissance art history and studies have been characterized as "old school" and irrelevant in the modern world. The Humanities, once pioneered and dominated by Renaissance scholars such as Jacob Burkhardt, Heinrich Wölfflin, Erwin Panofsky, Aby Warburg, among others, is today seen as a golden age long past.

The Humanities is measureless and defies definition, as it centers upon the human experience, social and cultural transformation, the quest for knowledge, and individual and collective curiosity. Renaissance studies embody these very pursuits by making connections between art, religion, social history, economics, politics, and even anthropology. Yet, we all have heard these questions from students and even our peers:

- "Why should I study Renaissance art, history, and literature if I intend to specialize in the modern/contemporary?"

- "How can studying Renaissance art contribute to my development as a practicing artist in the twenty-first century?"

- "How can Renaissance studies inform how I view and understand the modern world?"

- "What are the transferable skills obtained through the study of the Renaissance that would benefit me in a discipline or profession outside of art and the Humanities?"

This session aims to: 1) acknowledge the contributions of Renaissance art history and studies in understanding the modern world; 2) introduce and generate new avenues of research in Renaissance art and studies for the twenty-first century; 3) explore new methodologies in teaching Renaissance art and studies, among other related topics.

Paper proposals must include the following:

     Paper title (15-word maximum)

     Abstract (150-word maximum)

     Brief CV (300-word maximum)

     PhD completion date (past or expected)

     Full name, current affiliation, and e-mail address.

Please submit proposals to Anne H. Muraoka (amuraoka@odu.edu) and Marcia B. Hall (marciahall713@gmail.com) by 8 August 2018.

Tags:  image  Renaissance art history  Renaissance culture  Renaissance literature  Renaissance studies  text  visual culture 

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