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History CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
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This blog is for CfPs for sessions in history for RSA 2019 Toronto. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Jesuit Studies

Posted By Kathleen M. Comerford, Thursday, July 19, 2018
The Journal of Jesuit Studies is looking to organize panels in any aspect of Jesuit studies in any region, up to the year 1700, to include history, literature, art history, music history, or related topics, in all geographical areas.

Individual paper abstracts should be no more than 150 words and should identify up to 5 keywords.  Panel submissions should include the name of a chair who is not also a presenter.  All submissions must include a/v requests and a brief CV (including affiliation, date of PhD completion, general discipline area, rank, and publications or other evidence of scholarship) for each participant.  Please submit to Kathleen Comerford, kcomerfo@georgiasouthern.edu, no later than August 5, 2018.  We will consider panels, individual papers, and roundtables for sponsorship by the Journal of Jesuit Studies.  Sponsorship does not guarantee acceptance to the program and implies no intent to publish.

Tags:  academies  architecture  book history  charity  classicism  community  cultural history  devotion  digital humanities  dress history; economic history; fashion; working-  early modern  empire  ethnographies  global  history  history of reading  history of science  identity  Jesuits  patronage  philosophy  Religion  ritual  social history  the other  theology  urban spaces 

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Philological Communities in Context(s) in the Early Modern World (1400-1850)

Posted By Jennifer Mackenzie, Wednesday, July 4, 2018

In recent years, scholarly collections such as World Philology (2015, Ed. Pollock, Elman, and Chang) and Philology and Its Histories (2010, Ed. Gurd) have brought philology to the foreground of humanistic study “not just [as] a mode of scholarship” but as “one of its objects” (Gurd, Introduction to Philology and Its Histories, 5). Questioning teleological histories that trace how philology achieved a modern and scientific status in the nineteenth-century European university, these studies call for a broad canvas to account for the multiplicity and complexity of textual practices over time and space. They include, within the study of philology, not only the study of the transmission and editing of texts, but also of hermeneutical activities more generally, from textual readings to historical and cultural interpretations.

Our RSA panels seek to contribute to these efforts by examining philological practices in the early modern period (1400-1850) on a micro-historical scale, in their various social, institutional and/or political contexts. The aim is to bring to bear on the analysis of these practices recent developments in the history of academies, patronage, princely courts, universities, salons, libraries, and schools. On the premise that philological work often takes place in communal settings and practically always in relation to structures of power, we seek papers that illuminate these settings, and the exchanges they generate in specific early modern contexts. We are particularly interested in contributions that examine the effects of these circumstances on the development of specific philological practices or hermeneutic perspectives.

Individual papers might shed new light on communities which have been overlooked, having not generally been associated with the most (proto-)modern representatives of the development of philology as a scholarly discipline.  Or they might open newly contextualized perspectives on communities that have already played leading roles in philology’s historiography. In either case, we hope to enrich our methodologies for studying philological communities in context(s), with the goal of gaining a greater appreciation of philology’s political stakes in the early modern world, and of the varieties of its institutional incarnations.

—   How were philological practices developed, taught, transmitted, and performed within specific communities? How did they contribute to building communities? Can philological communities be studied through their textual and hermeneutical practices — and, if so, how?

—   How were particular theories or practices of philology — that is explicit or implicit articulations of philology’s methods and aims – bound up with social (i.e. class, familial, professional) affiliations?

—   How did the institutions or political structures in which philology was carried out shape philological approaches, in theory and in practice? How was philology in turn used by those who performed it, theorized it, or patronized it? In particular, in what ways could philological activities legitimize and/or subvert power?

—   How did philological work participate in local dynamics (in courts, cities, city states, etc.) and/or how was it used in international politics, for diplomatic purposes or when international conflicts arose?

   How did institutional and/or political patronage constrain and/or nourish the practice of philology? Why were philologists valuable to institutions, powerful families, and princes — and how did they leverage their skills to serve the powerful, while also establishing their practices as valuable, legitimate and even autonomous forms of know-how?

Please submit a short (max. 150 words) abstract and CV by July 31, 2018 to Jennifer Mackenzie (jennifer.mackenzie@fandm.edu) and Déborah Blocker (dblocker@berkeley.edu).

Tags:  academies  courts  history of reading  patronage  philology  social history  universities 

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