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History CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
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This blog is for CfPs for sessions in history for RSA 2019 Toronto. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Top tags: social history  early modern  history  literature  gender  material culture  patronage  Religion  renaissance  urban spaces  architecture  art  art history  book history  devotion  history of science  identity  ritual  catholic reform early modern  charity  classicism  confraternity  cultural history  digital humanities  environmental history  global  history of reading  interdisciplinary  philosophy  piety 

Printing, Reception, Editing, and Teaching Thomas More and Early Humanists

Posted By Emily A. Ransom, Tuesday, July 24, 2018

The Amici Thomae Mori is excited to welcome proposals for papers on Thomas More studies to coincide with the publication of the new Essential Works of Thomas More (Yale University Press, 2019).  This single-volume, accessible, readable edition will be the third major collection of More’s works in nearly five hundred years, after the 1557 Workes published by More’s nephew William Rastell and the Yale Complete Works in fifteen volumes completed in 1997. Though papers on all areas of Thomas More studies will be considered, the Amici is especially interested in topics that will complement this important publication, such as print history of humanist texts, reception history of Thomas More and early humanists, editing humanist texts, and teaching humanist texts in the modern classroom.

 

To submit a paper, please send your title (15-word max), abstract (150-word max), a few keywords, CV, PhD completion date (past or expected), and affiliation to Emily Ransom (ransome@uwgb.edu) by August 10, 2018.  

Tags:  book history  catholic reform early modern  classical reception  classicism  devotion  early modern  history  history of reading  pedagogy  political history  print culture  printers  Religion  religious communities  renaissance  theology 

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Defining Space: Walls and Cities in the Early Modern World

Posted By Luis J. Gordo Pelaez, Thursday, July 19, 2018

Walls have been an omnipresent feature of human settlements since ancient times. Even today they continue to be apart of our daily life and discourse, whether for politically driven purposes (i.e. US border “security”) or satyr (i.e. the now defunk website, Bricking it for Canada). Whether ancient or contemporary, walls have contributed to defining and redefining spaces, creating a sense of place and identity, demarcating physical boundaries, and imposing socio-economic hierarchies of inclusion and exclusion. In the context of early modern cities, walls experienced a resurgence as a consequence, among others, of expanding empires and colonizing efforts, the development of warfare technology and new systems of fortification, and the implementation of directives regarding the distribution and use of urban space. Whether materialized or not (Richard Kagan has examined their absence in inland colonial Spanish America), walls were a common occurrence in the schemes of early modern urban theorists and planners, and a frequent instrument of discussion in the political and socio-economic plans of absolute regimes, particularly in foreign dominions. For better or worse, walls have maintained their relevance. Framed by contemporary understandings of walls, this session aims to examine the relationship between cities and walls during the early modern era from a global comparative perspective. Papers that interrogate this interplay in any of its manifestations (conceptualization and building, notions of agency and perception associated with these infrastructures, the dichotomy inside/outside, narrative and graphic representation, and materiality) during the period 1300-1700 are particularly welcome to this comparative panel. 

 

Please send paper titles (15-word max.); abstracts (150-word max.); brief CVs; PhD competition date (past or expected); full name, current affiliation, and e-mail address to organizers (Cody Barteet, cbarteet@uwo.ca; and Luis Gordo-Peláez, luisgordopelaez@csufresno.edu) by August 8, 2018. Submission guidelines are available at https://www.rsa.org/page/2019SubmissionsGuide .

Tags:  architecture  art  art history  city  cultural history  early modern  history  identity  literature  material culture  representation  seventeenth century  sixteenth century  social history  urban spaces  urban studies  urbanism  walls 

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Jesuit Studies

Posted By Kathleen M. Comerford, Thursday, July 19, 2018
The Journal of Jesuit Studies is looking to organize panels in any aspect of Jesuit studies in any region, up to the year 1700, to include history, literature, art history, music history, or related topics, in all geographical areas.

Individual paper abstracts should be no more than 150 words and should identify up to 5 keywords.  Panel submissions should include the name of a chair who is not also a presenter.  All submissions must include a/v requests and a brief CV (including affiliation, date of PhD completion, general discipline area, rank, and publications or other evidence of scholarship) for each participant.  Please submit to Kathleen Comerford, kcomerfo@georgiasouthern.edu, no later than August 5, 2018.  We will consider panels, individual papers, and roundtables for sponsorship by the Journal of Jesuit Studies.  Sponsorship does not guarantee acceptance to the program and implies no intent to publish.

Tags:  academies  architecture  book history  charity  classicism  community  cultural history  devotion  digital humanities  dress history; economic history; fashion; working-  early modern  empire  ethnographies  global  history  history of reading  history of science  identity  Jesuits  patronage  philosophy  Religion  ritual  social history  the other  theology  urban spaces 

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Health in Medicine and Visual Arts, 1300-1550

Posted By Jordan J. Famularo, Friday, July 13, 2018

CFP: Health in Medicine and Visual Arts, 1300-1550

Artists and architects contributed to cultures of health in medieval and early modern societies, yet their ties to medical practice are often overlooked in modern scholarship. This session invites historians across disciplines to compare their approaches to visual cultures of medicine between 1300 and 1550. Which perspectives and methods might be productively shared among historians of medicine, science, art, architecture, and other specialties focused on care for the body, mind, and soul? A key objective is to advance research on interactions between learned medicine (i.e., taught in universities) and visual arts.

Papers are invited to address the body of knowledge by which artifacts and monuments were believed to be therapeutic and/or protective. How and why were such effects ascribed to images, objects, and spaces?

Topics might include

- images in medical astrology: instructions for their making and use

- restorative spaces in domestic and institutional buildings

- therapeutic works on paper: books, almanacs, calendars, prints

- apothecaries and foreign ingredients in the service of medicine and pigment-making

- objects and environments used in regimens for preserving health and hygiene

Intercultural, interregional, and transoceanic topics are welcome.

Paper proposals are due by August 5, 2018 to Jordan Famularo, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University (jjf376@nyu.edu). Proposals should include two documents: an abstract with paper title (250 words maximum) and CV. Please indicate the presenter’s title and affiliation. 

Submissions are considered commitments to attend the conference and to be responsible for registration and membership fees.

Tags:  architecture  art  astrology  early modern  History of Medicine  History of Science  interdisciplinary  medicine  medieval 

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CFP RSA 2018: The Networks of Non-Elite Women in Early Modern Societies

Posted By Marlee Couling, Wednesday, June 20, 2018

CFP, RSA 2019 (Toronto, 17-19 March 2019)

"Friends, Neighbours, Allies: The Networks of Non-Elite Women in Early Modern Societies"

An ever-richer scholarship has explored the social relationships and cultural collaborations of literate and elite early modern women. This panel seeks to broaden our understanding of homosocial networks to include working, poor, and marginalized women between 1500-1700. Representations drawn from literary texts, visual imagery, and archival sources are welcome.

 

Themes of interest might include: the role of gender in female networks; relationships between peers or across social categories such as mistress and servant; meanings of friendship among plebeian women; emotions, especially empathy; instrumentality and collaboration; material exchanges; and coping strategies, including the illegal.

 

Papers about a mix of geographical and cultural settings will advance discussion of similarities and differences in the same-sex relationships of early modern women.

 

Elizabeth Cohen (York University), collaborating on this CFP, will chair the panel.

 

Please email paper proposals, including a title and abstract of 100-150 words, as well as a one-page C.V. (300 words) to Marlee Couling (marleej@yorku.ca) by Friday, July 20, 2018.

Tags:  community  early modern  friends  gender  plebeian  social history  women 

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Kircher’s World

Posted By Thomas Beachdel, Friday, June 15, 2018
Updated: Friday, June 15, 2018

Call For Papers

Renaissance Society of America

Annual Conference, March 17-19, 2019, Toronto, Canada

Kircher’s World

This panel invites papers on the work, influence, or problematization of the seventeenth-century polymath, Athanasius Kircher (1602-1680). A category defying figure caught between the encyclopaedism of the Renaissance and the turn toward specialized knowledge, Kircher has not received the attention of his more “scientific” contemporaries, such as Kepler or Newton, and is often regarded as an outside figure, given his penchant for the arcane, the mysterious, and his adherence to the Hermetic tradition, despite the work of Copernicus. At the same time, the vast outpouring of Kircher’s work on a broad range of subjects—Egyptian civilization and hieroglyphs (Oedipus Aegyptiacus), music (Musurgia Universalis), China (China Monumentis), geology (Mundus Subterraneus)—was extremely influential to a wide audience during his lifetime. Of particular interest are papers dealing with Kircher’s Mundus Subterraneus and the influence of this text and his viewpoint on geology, theories of the formation of the earth, and volcanism.

Session Chair: Thomas Beachdel, CUNY, Hostos

Please submit a short (max. 150 word) abstract and CV by July 31, 2018 to: thomas.beachdel@gmail.com

Tags:  art  book history  early modern  history of science  print culture  renaissance 

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The Society for Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy Call for Papers RSA 2019

Posted By Sean D. Erwin, Friday, June 1, 2018

The Society for Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy will sponsor several panels at the 2019 annual meeting of the Renaissance Society of America in Toronto, March 17th to 19th, 2019.  We welcome proposals on any relevant theme, but we are especially interested in the following topics:

·           Medieval and Renaissance accounts of language.

·           The transmission of Medieval and Renaissance authors in Early Modernity.

·           Discussions of critical receptions of Medieval and Renaissance authors

and the interpretive effects these readings engendered.

·           Themes linked to work on Machiavelli and Lucretius and their transmission.

Please submit a paper title, abstract (150 words) and abbreviated CV (300 words) to Sean Erwin (Serwin@barry.edu) by Monday July 16th, 2018.  Papers should have a presentation length of twenty minutes or less and should be delivered in English.

 In line with RSA guidelines, presenters must have a PhD or other terminal degree or be an advanced dissertation candidate presenting on a topic derived from their current dissertation research.  For complete submission guidelines please see: https://www.rsa.org/page/2019SubmissionsGuide

Due to changes to the RSA conference planning schedule, Associate Organizations like the SMRP will not be notified of approved panels until November 1st, 2018.  The deadline for conference registration is December 15th, 2018.  Please note: to present at the RSA one must pay for RSA membership for the conference year in question. 

We would also ask that presenters consider becoming members of the SMRP.  To become a member visit http://smrpphil.org/ and click Membership.

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Tags:  early modern  medieval  philosophy  renaissance 

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