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History CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
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This blog is for CfPs for sessions in history for RSA 2019 Toronto. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Top tags: social history  early modern  history  literature  gender  material culture  patronage  Religion  renaissance  urban spaces  architecture  art  art history  book history  devotion  history of science  identity  ritual  catholic reform early modern  charity  classicism  confraternity  cultural history  digital humanities  environmental history  global  history of reading  interdisciplinary  philosophy  piety 

Defining Space: Walls and Cities in the Early Modern World

Posted By Luis J. Gordo Pelaez, Thursday, July 19, 2018

Walls have been an omnipresent feature of human settlements since ancient times. Even today they continue to be apart of our daily life and discourse, whether for politically driven purposes (i.e. US border “security”) or satyr (i.e. the now defunk website, Bricking it for Canada). Whether ancient or contemporary, walls have contributed to defining and redefining spaces, creating a sense of place and identity, demarcating physical boundaries, and imposing socio-economic hierarchies of inclusion and exclusion. In the context of early modern cities, walls experienced a resurgence as a consequence, among others, of expanding empires and colonizing efforts, the development of warfare technology and new systems of fortification, and the implementation of directives regarding the distribution and use of urban space. Whether materialized or not (Richard Kagan has examined their absence in inland colonial Spanish America), walls were a common occurrence in the schemes of early modern urban theorists and planners, and a frequent instrument of discussion in the political and socio-economic plans of absolute regimes, particularly in foreign dominions. For better or worse, walls have maintained their relevance. Framed by contemporary understandings of walls, this session aims to examine the relationship between cities and walls during the early modern era from a global comparative perspective. Papers that interrogate this interplay in any of its manifestations (conceptualization and building, notions of agency and perception associated with these infrastructures, the dichotomy inside/outside, narrative and graphic representation, and materiality) during the period 1300-1700 are particularly welcome to this comparative panel. 

 

Please send paper titles (15-word max.); abstracts (150-word max.); brief CVs; PhD competition date (past or expected); full name, current affiliation, and e-mail address to organizers (Cody Barteet, cbarteet@uwo.ca; and Luis Gordo-Peláez, luisgordopelaez@csufresno.edu) by August 8, 2018. Submission guidelines are available at https://www.rsa.org/page/2019SubmissionsGuide .

Tags:  architecture  art  art history  city  cultural history  early modern  history  identity  literature  material culture  representation  seventeenth century  sixteenth century  social history  urban spaces  urban studies  urbanism  walls 

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Jesuit Studies

Posted By Kathleen M. Comerford, Thursday, July 19, 2018
The Journal of Jesuit Studies is looking to organize panels in any aspect of Jesuit studies in any region, up to the year 1700, to include history, literature, art history, music history, or related topics, in all geographical areas.

Individual paper abstracts should be no more than 150 words and should identify up to 5 keywords.  Panel submissions should include the name of a chair who is not also a presenter.  All submissions must include a/v requests and a brief CV (including affiliation, date of PhD completion, general discipline area, rank, and publications or other evidence of scholarship) for each participant.  Please submit to Kathleen Comerford, kcomerfo@georgiasouthern.edu, no later than August 5, 2018.  We will consider panels, individual papers, and roundtables for sponsorship by the Journal of Jesuit Studies.  Sponsorship does not guarantee acceptance to the program and implies no intent to publish.

Tags:  academies  architecture  book history  charity  classicism  community  cultural history  devotion  digital humanities  dress history; economic history; fashion; working-  early modern  empire  ethnographies  global  history  history of reading  history of science  identity  Jesuits  patronage  philosophy  Religion  ritual  social history  the other  theology  urban spaces 

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Flooding, water, public works: environment & cultures of intervention 1400-1700

Posted By David C. Rosenthal, Saturday, July 7, 2018
Updated: Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Recent environmental history has stressed how the relationship between communities and landscapes could be mutually structuring – when it came to mitigating threats of disaster but also in regard to the control and exploitation of natural resources. This panel focuses on water, on initiatives that looked to confront the threat of inundation from the sea or flood-prone rivers, to control water for industrial and agricultural purposes, or to develop urban water supplies and sanitation. Such initiatives could include both state-run public works programs, and local and community schemes; they could be piecemeal or more programatically reactive to conditions on the ground. The panel seeks to be interdisciplinary and welcomes papers that explore aspects of what might be called cultures of intervention in early modern Europe, which tease out how environmental initiatives intersected with social, economic or political concerns, challenges and change.

Themes might include but are not limited to:

The idea and development of environmental ‘public works’

Flooding and flood prevention - community practices, government intervention

Labour, forced or voluntary; public works schemes and ‘unemployment’

Culture of innovation, hydraulic techniques and practitioners

Representations: flooding, water control and public works in visual and literary culture

Please send an abstract (150 words max), a list of 3 keywords, and a brief academic CV (300 words max) to david.rosenthal@ed.ac.uk by July 27

Tags:  environmental history  government  poverty  social history 

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Philological Communities in Context(s) in the Early Modern World (1400-1850)

Posted By Jennifer Mackenzie, Wednesday, July 4, 2018

In recent years, scholarly collections such as World Philology (2015, Ed. Pollock, Elman, and Chang) and Philology and Its Histories (2010, Ed. Gurd) have brought philology to the foreground of humanistic study “not just [as] a mode of scholarship” but as “one of its objects” (Gurd, Introduction to Philology and Its Histories, 5). Questioning teleological histories that trace how philology achieved a modern and scientific status in the nineteenth-century European university, these studies call for a broad canvas to account for the multiplicity and complexity of textual practices over time and space. They include, within the study of philology, not only the study of the transmission and editing of texts, but also of hermeneutical activities more generally, from textual readings to historical and cultural interpretations.

Our RSA panels seek to contribute to these efforts by examining philological practices in the early modern period (1400-1850) on a micro-historical scale, in their various social, institutional and/or political contexts. The aim is to bring to bear on the analysis of these practices recent developments in the history of academies, patronage, princely courts, universities, salons, libraries, and schools. On the premise that philological work often takes place in communal settings and practically always in relation to structures of power, we seek papers that illuminate these settings, and the exchanges they generate in specific early modern contexts. We are particularly interested in contributions that examine the effects of these circumstances on the development of specific philological practices or hermeneutic perspectives.

Individual papers might shed new light on communities which have been overlooked, having not generally been associated with the most (proto-)modern representatives of the development of philology as a scholarly discipline.  Or they might open newly contextualized perspectives on communities that have already played leading roles in philology’s historiography. In either case, we hope to enrich our methodologies for studying philological communities in context(s), with the goal of gaining a greater appreciation of philology’s political stakes in the early modern world, and of the varieties of its institutional incarnations.

—   How were philological practices developed, taught, transmitted, and performed within specific communities? How did they contribute to building communities? Can philological communities be studied through their textual and hermeneutical practices — and, if so, how?

—   How were particular theories or practices of philology — that is explicit or implicit articulations of philology’s methods and aims – bound up with social (i.e. class, familial, professional) affiliations?

—   How did the institutions or political structures in which philology was carried out shape philological approaches, in theory and in practice? How was philology in turn used by those who performed it, theorized it, or patronized it? In particular, in what ways could philological activities legitimize and/or subvert power?

—   How did philological work participate in local dynamics (in courts, cities, city states, etc.) and/or how was it used in international politics, for diplomatic purposes or when international conflicts arose?

   How did institutional and/or political patronage constrain and/or nourish the practice of philology? Why were philologists valuable to institutions, powerful families, and princes — and how did they leverage their skills to serve the powerful, while also establishing their practices as valuable, legitimate and even autonomous forms of know-how?

Please submit a short (max. 150 words) abstract and CV by July 31, 2018 to Jennifer Mackenzie (jennifer.mackenzie@fandm.edu) and Déborah Blocker (dblocker@berkeley.edu).

Tags:  academies  courts  history of reading  patronage  philology  social history  universities 

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More Than Merely Passive: Addressing the Early Modern Audience

Posted By John R. Decker, Monday, July 2, 2018
Updated: Monday, July 9, 2018

“… so that the learned may savor the profundity of the allegory while the humble may profit from the lightness of the story” (de modo praedicandi)

 

Early modern audiences were not homogenous. Differences in status, education, language, wealth, and experience (to name only a few) could influence how a group of people, or a particular person, received and made sense of sermons, public proclamations, images, objects, and spaces. The ways in which images, objects, proclamations, etc. were framed and executed could have a serious impact on their relevance and effectiveness. This session seeks papers that investigate the ways in which authors, artists, preachers, theologians, and civic or court officials took account of and encoded pluriform audiences in their works. Topics might consider, but are not limited to, questions such as: What sorts of strategies were employed to take into account multiple ‘levels’ of audience? How well did such strategies work? What were the consequences—possible or actual—when they failed? Please submit an abstract and CV by no later than 30 July, 2018 to: jdecker@pratt.edu.

Tags:  art history  artists  collaboration  cultural history  gender  identity  images  imagination  invention  literature  material culture  patronage  religious communities  representation  social history  urban spaces  urbanism  visual arts  visual communication  visual culture 

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CFP RSA 2018: The Networks of Non-Elite Women in Early Modern Societies

Posted By Marlee Couling, Wednesday, June 20, 2018

CFP, RSA 2019 (Toronto, 17-19 March 2019)

"Friends, Neighbours, Allies: The Networks of Non-Elite Women in Early Modern Societies"

An ever-richer scholarship has explored the social relationships and cultural collaborations of literate and elite early modern women. This panel seeks to broaden our understanding of homosocial networks to include working, poor, and marginalized women between 1500-1700. Representations drawn from literary texts, visual imagery, and archival sources are welcome.

 

Themes of interest might include: the role of gender in female networks; relationships between peers or across social categories such as mistress and servant; meanings of friendship among plebeian women; emotions, especially empathy; instrumentality and collaboration; material exchanges; and coping strategies, including the illegal.

 

Papers about a mix of geographical and cultural settings will advance discussion of similarities and differences in the same-sex relationships of early modern women.

 

Elizabeth Cohen (York University), collaborating on this CFP, will chair the panel.

 

Please email paper proposals, including a title and abstract of 100-150 words, as well as a one-page C.V. (300 words) to Marlee Couling (marleej@yorku.ca) by Friday, July 20, 2018.

Tags:  community  early modern  friends  gender  plebeian  social history  women 

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Deadline Extended: The Streets of Rome: Urbanism, Architecture, and the Social Sphere

Posted By Jasmine R. Cloud, Friday, June 8, 2018
Updated: Wednesday, August 1, 2018

A visit to twenty-first-century Rome still reveals the early modern moments that shaped its streets, piazze, and the experience of moving through them. The streets of Rome were sites of social exchange, provided opportunities to exert one’s will through building and destruction, witnessed sacred and secular processions, and functioned as places of devotion, among other things. As Joseph Connors noted, “To walk through Rome is to navigate through fields of influence that...buildings generate around themselves.” This session invites papers that examine the streets of the Caput Mundi, whether as the place for artistic and architectural activities or as physical, shifting spaces of the early modern city.


Themes might include: the manipulation of streets by public, private, or papal entities; the experience of moving through the streets of the city; buildings and their effect on the street or street system; how artistic communities shaped streets and neighborhoods; the streets as an organizational system for early modern documentation; depictions of streets; artists' and architects’ experiences of street life in Rome; and ephemeral or permanent monuments in the streets.


Please send title (15-word maximum), abstract (150-word maximum), keywords, and a brief CV (300 word maximum) to Jasmine Cloud (cloud@ucmo.edu) by August 5, 2018.


Tags:  architecture  Rome  social history  urban spaces  urbanism 

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Early Modern Eschatology

Posted By Victoria A. Yeoman, Friday, June 8, 2018
Updated: Wednesday, August 1, 2018

*Deadline extended to August 5th.

Papers are invited on any aspect of eschatology, providere novissima (“the foreseeing of the last things”), or the “last things” of human life and time: the moment of death, the final judgement and arrival of the new millennium, and the final destination of souls in heaven or hell. Of particular interest are papers related to early modern material and visual representations of the final events of human history, the destruction of the world, or the end of time. 

 

Papers might address topics such as:

·     Visual representations of the end of the world and/or the last things.

·     The role of visual or material culture in envisioning and contemplating the end of human life.

·     The materialization of eschatological ideologies in the early modern home.

·     Contemporary strains of eschatological thought in reformed culture.

·     Discussion of the final events of human history in sermons, devotional literature, emblem books, or imaginative literature.

·     Collection and display of images of the last things.

·     Centrality of art and materiality to understandings of eschatology.

·     The evolution of eschatological attitudes over time.

 

Submissions should be sent by July 16th to Victoria Yeoman (victoriayeoman025@gmail.com) and should include the following information:

·      a paper title (15-word maximum)

·      abstract (150-word maximum) 

·      a very brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum).

Tags:  material culture  piety  religion  ritual  social history 

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New Approaches to Catholic Reform

Posted By Marie Louise Lillywhite, Monday, June 4, 2018
Updated: Monday, June 4, 2018

Recently, scholars have approached Catholic Reform in new ways, by looking beyond Tridentine frameworks, extending beyond European borders, and challenging traditional arguments and understandings of this critical period in the history of the Church. Rather than focusing purely on a top-down enforcement of reform, or failed attempts to combat Protestantism, scholars of history, history of art, music, and literature have used new and varied approaches to understand the impact of religious reform in the early modern period and the ways in which people negotiated it.

The organizers of this panel would like to invite papers that consider Catholic Reform from across the disciplines, with the aim of contributing to a broader and more holistic understanding of the process, bringing together research from different fields and varied geographic locations. Papers might directly address new methods and approaches, or might demonstrate them through specific research, but all will contribute to a growing conversation on the nature and significance of Catholic Reform.

Potential topics could include:

-       Approaches to Catholic Reform broadly or within specific field/subfields

-       Reinterpretations of older arguments and narratives about Catholic Reform

-       The influence of Catholic Reform on music, literature, culture, politics, etc.

-       The influence of Catholic Reform on art and architecture (patronage, examples of censorship, debates concerning the nature of the sacred image)

-       Limitations of Reform

-       Reform in a global context

-       Reactions of the laity to Catholic Reform

Proposals should include the presenter’s name, academic affiliation (if applicable), email address, paper title (15 words maximum), abstract (150 words maximum) and brief academic CV (300 words maximum). Please submit proposals by July 20 to Marie-Louise Lillywhite (marie-louise.lillywhite@history.ox.ac.uk) and Celeste McNamara (c.mcnamara@warwick.ac.uk). Presenters will need to be members of the RSA by the time of the conference. The RSA offers a limited number of travel grants; see their website for more information. 

Tags:  catholic reform early modern  confraternity  patronage  social history 

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CfP: Beyond the Microcosm: The Impact of Confraternities on the Civic Sphere

Posted By Samantha J. Hughes-Johnson, Tuesday, May 8, 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS

(Deadline: 1 August 2018)

 

The Society for Confraternity Studies will sponsor a number of sessions at the 65th Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America (17 - 19 March 2019) in Toronto, Canada. Accordingly, it invites proposals for papers on the following theme:

 

Beyond the Microcosm: The Impact of Confraternities on the Civic Sphere.

 

Since the formation of the Society for Confraternity Studies, which celebrates it 30th anniversary in 2019, the subject of Confraternity Studies has moved on from what Konrad Eisenbichler once described as an “invisible history” to become an authoritative sub-field of late medieval and early modern scholarship. Accordingly, in order to encourage a discourse that places confraternities at the center of essential historical developments rather than at their periphery, we invite proposals for papers that explore the amplitude and impact of lay sodalities in Europe, the Americas, the East and Asia in relation to the activities of wider late medieval and early modern society. Papers might focus on, but are not limited to the following topics:

·     The reach and range of lesser traversed sodalities. For example, slave confraternities.

·     The relationships between lay companies and non members. For instance, confraternal liaisons with artisans, food merchants or second-hand clothes sellers.

·     Confratelli and consorelle entrusted with public service, healthcare and the custody of people or objects.

·     The influence of confraternal ritual and recreation on urban spaces.

·     Individual and familial investment in lay companies in order to garner social influence or to gain political power.

·     Associations between the devotional lives of non-clerics and the ordained: how these affinities played out in rituals, drama and music.

·     The impact of art, architecture and ephemera commissioned by confraternities on public spaces and/or the popular conscience.

Papers should concentrate on confraternal activities between 1300 and 1700. We are however, also particularly interested in proposals that discuss retrospectively, the value of studies that have emerged since the conference in 1989 and consider how Confraternity Studies will advance into the twenty-first century.

Proposals should include the presenter’s name, academic affiliation, email, the paper title (no longer than 15 words), the abstract of the paper (no longer than 150 words), a brief academic C.V. (not longer than 300 words), and a series of key-words that suit the presentation. Please be sure all nine (7) categories of information are clearly provided. 

Please submit your proposal to Dr Samantha J.C. Hughes-Johnson at samanthajanecaroline@yahoo.co.ukby 1 August 2018.

Tags:  charity  confraternity  devotion  drama  gender studies  global  hospitals  late medieval  lay sodality  literature  music  piety  poverty  public spaces  Renaissance  ritual  social history 

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