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History CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
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This blog is for CfPs for sessions in history for RSA 2019 Toronto. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Top tags: social history  early modern  history  literature  gender  material culture  patronage  Religion  renaissance  urban spaces  architecture  art  art history  book history  devotion  history of science  identity  ritual  catholic reform early modern  charity  classicism  confraternity  cultural history  digital humanities  environmental history  global  history of reading  interdisciplinary  philosophy  piety 

Printing, Reception, Editing, and Teaching Thomas More and Early Humanists

Posted By Emily A. Ransom, Tuesday, July 24, 2018

The Amici Thomae Mori is excited to welcome proposals for papers on Thomas More studies to coincide with the publication of the new Essential Works of Thomas More (Yale University Press, 2019).  This single-volume, accessible, readable edition will be the third major collection of More’s works in nearly five hundred years, after the 1557 Workes published by More’s nephew William Rastell and the Yale Complete Works in fifteen volumes completed in 1997. Though papers on all areas of Thomas More studies will be considered, the Amici is especially interested in topics that will complement this important publication, such as print history of humanist texts, reception history of Thomas More and early humanists, editing humanist texts, and teaching humanist texts in the modern classroom.

 

To submit a paper, please send your title (15-word max), abstract (150-word max), a few keywords, CV, PhD completion date (past or expected), and affiliation to Emily Ransom (ransome@uwgb.edu) by August 10, 2018.  

Tags:  book history  catholic reform early modern  classical reception  classicism  devotion  early modern  history  history of reading  pedagogy  political history  print culture  printers  Religion  religious communities  renaissance  theology 

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Jesuit Studies

Posted By Kathleen M. Comerford, Thursday, July 19, 2018
The Journal of Jesuit Studies is looking to organize panels in any aspect of Jesuit studies in any region, up to the year 1700, to include history, literature, art history, music history, or related topics, in all geographical areas.

Individual paper abstracts should be no more than 150 words and should identify up to 5 keywords.  Panel submissions should include the name of a chair who is not also a presenter.  All submissions must include a/v requests and a brief CV (including affiliation, date of PhD completion, general discipline area, rank, and publications or other evidence of scholarship) for each participant.  Please submit to Kathleen Comerford, kcomerfo@georgiasouthern.edu, no later than August 5, 2018.  We will consider panels, individual papers, and roundtables for sponsorship by the Journal of Jesuit Studies.  Sponsorship does not guarantee acceptance to the program and implies no intent to publish.

Tags:  academies  architecture  book history  charity  classicism  community  cultural history  devotion  digital humanities  dress history; economic history; fashion; working-  early modern  empire  ethnographies  global  history  history of reading  history of science  identity  Jesuits  patronage  philosophy  Religion  ritual  social history  the other  theology  urban spaces 

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Printers, Their Social Networks, and the Public Sphere.

Posted By Scott K. Oldenburg, Monday, May 28, 2018

For a proposed panel at RSA 2019 (Toronto, 17 -19 March): I am seeking papers on early modern printers. Our modern sense of publishers as (more often than not) merely profiting from the creative agency of authors obscures the meaningful role early printers had in cultural production, politics (conservative and radical), the reception of major works, and the establishment of a public sphere. Printers sometimes simply sought sales, but they also often specialized and promoted particular agendas. Thomas Berthelet, for instance, printed several texts in support of the humanist education of women; French Protestant printer Thomas Vautrollier teamed up with Arthur Golding to produce Huguenot propaganda; and a few weeks after a stint in Newgate, Gabriel Simson printed Luke Hutton’s The Black Dog of Newgate, a scathing attack on the conditions in that prison. In what ways did individual printers shape the discourse of the period? How did the social network of a printer, or the materials of a particular shop contribute to ideological output? How did female printers (Elizabeth Allde, Jacqueline Vautrollier, Ellen Boyle, and others) influence prevailing ideas of gender or religion? How did specific apprenticeships influence the output of particular shops? In what ways did the Stationers Company and other such organizations facilitate or hinder open discourse? Although the above examples are about English print shops, the call is open to scholars working in other languages and regions as well. Proposals due August 1, 2018.

Send proposals to Scott Oldenburg, soldenbu@tulane.edu

Proposals should include 1) paper title; 2) abstract (150-word max.); 3) short cv (300-word max, not prose); 4) list of five keywords; 5) AV requirements. Note that panelists must register for the conference and arrange for their own travel and lodging. 

Tags:  book history  material culture  print culture  printers  theology 

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