This website uses cookies to store information on your computer. Some of these cookies are used for visitor analysis, others are essential to making our site function properly and improve the user experience. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Click Accept to consent and dismiss this message or Deny to leave this website. Read our Privacy Statement for more.
Print Page   |   Sign In   |   Register
Literature CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
Blog Home All Blogs
This blog is for CfPs for sessions in literature for RSA 2019 Toronto. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: Literature  early modern  gender  book history  Poetry  material culture  print culture  Renaissance literature  drama  Iberian Peninsula  identity  women  epic poetry  history of reading  printers  reception history  religion  archival research  art history  catholic reform  classical literature  classical reception  colonial Latin America  cultural history  devotional  digital humanities  history of the book  interdisciplinary  Italian literature  Italy 

Call for Papers – Deadline Extended​ – Embodying Value: Representing Money in the Early Modern Period

Posted By Natasha Seaman, Friday, July 20, 2018

Call for Papers – Deadline Extended 

Embodying Value: Representing Money in the Early Modern Period

Joanna Woodall and Natasha Seaman, co-organizers

As media of exchange, coins were essential to trade and economic development in the early modern period. Their double-sided form and the precious materials from which they were made had deep resonance in European culture and beyond. The efficacy of coins depended on faith in their inherent value, yet they were subject to debasement and counterfeiting.  This session seeks papers that explore the signifying potential of money in works of art and how abstract concepts of value intersect with and are figured in material and monetary forms. While the art market may have some relevance to this subject, papers selected will have as their primary focus the particular character of coins and other means of exchange as physical and semiotic entities, money as it appears within images and texts, and how concepts of money and currency can inform our understanding of works of art in this period.

This is a continuation our 2017 sessions on the same topic. Abstracts submitted will also be considered for inclusion in an edited volume.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to

Depictions of coins in exchange, gifts, or theft

Represented coins in still lifes and kunstkammers

Coins as metaphors in literature

Coins and the production of knowledge

Counterfeiting and debasement in works of art

Coins in relation to portrait medals, seals, or pilgrimage badges

Coins and the Eucharist and/or Incarnation

The materiality, design, and production of coins in relation to their value and use

Assertions of value in bills of exchange

Coins and the material mechanisms of exchange with the New World

Please send proposals to Natasha Seaman (nseaman@ric.edu) and Joanna Woodall (Joanna.Woodall@courtauld.ac.uk) by Friday, July 27, 2018.

As per RSA guidelines, proposals should include the following: paper title (15-word maximum), abstract (150-word maximum), keywords, and a very brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum). See
http://www.rsa.org/?page=submissionguidelines#CfP

 

 

 

 

Download File (PDF)

This post has not been tagged.

PermalinkComments (0)
 

In Search of the Canon: Poets and Artists Confronting with their Models (c. 1500-1700)

Posted By Maria G. Matarazzo, Thursday, July 19, 2018

The theory of Imitation was a central topic of discussion in the ‘Republic of Letters’. The European community of humanists, philosophers, poets and artists was engaged in the dispute over the models to refer to during the creative process. How to develop a normative canon as a reference point for artists and writers in the practice of Imitation? Which poets and artists to select as the examples of ‘bello stile’?

While the authority of ancient models was universally acknowledged, the building of a canon of modern masters was under discussion. One of the typical environments of this discussion were the Academies, where writers, artists, philosophers, antiquarians gathered around learned patrons.

Considering the interdisciplinary nature of this debate, this panel aims to explore the construction of a canon through a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective. The main purpose is not only to study the mechanisms implied in the building of the canon but also to bring out the intersections between Art and Literature concerning this topic.

Questions to be considered include but are not limited to: the institutions where the debate took place, with a particular focus on the Academies; rhetorical devices for debating the canon and the metaphors of Imitation; the circulation of the canon through publishing, printings, new editions and reproductive printmaking; the impact of the canon on the teaching practices.

 

Please submit proposals to Ida Duretto (ida.duretto@sns.it) and Maria Gabriella Matarazzo (mariagabriella.matarazzo@sns.it) by August 12, 2018.

Proposals should include a paper title, an abstract (150-word maximum), keywords and a CV (300-word maximum).

Tags:  academies  Art History  book history  cultural history  early modern  history of reading  history of the book  Imitation  interdisciplinary  literature  mimesis  patronage  philology  Poetry  print culture  publishers  reproductive prints  the canon  visual arts 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Jesuit Studies

Posted By Kathleen M. Comerford, Thursday, July 19, 2018
The Journal of Jesuit Studies is looking to organize panels in any aspect of Jesuit studies in any region, up to the year 1700, to include history, literature, art history, music history, or related topics, in all geographical areas.

Individual paper abstracts should be no more than 150 words and should identify up to 5 keywords.  Panel submissions should include the name of a chair who is not also a presenter.  All submissions must include a/v requests and a brief CV (including affiliation, date of PhD completion, general discipline area, rank, and publications or other evidence of scholarship) for each participant.  Please submit to Kathleen Comerford, kcomerfo@georgiasouthern.edu, no later than August 5, 2018.  We will consider panels, individual papers, and roundtables for sponsorship by the Journal of Jesuit Studies.  Sponsorship does not guarantee acceptance to the program and implies no intent to publish.

Tags:  book history  catholic reform  classical literature  classicism  colonial Latin America  devotional  digital humanities  drama  early modern; gender studies; interdisciplinary; l  English literature  epic  French  French literature  frontispizes  German literature  hagiographical  identity  intercultural relations  Italian Renaissance  Italy  literature  manuscript  Neoplatonism  patronage  Poetics  print culture  printers  Psalms  publishers  race studies  readers  Reception  reception history  religion  Renaissance culture  Renaissance literature  representation  reproductive prints  ritual  Scripture  seventeenth century  sexuality  slaves  sodality  Spain  the Indies 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Deadline extended - Rebranding Renaissance Art History and Studies for the Twenty-First Century

Posted By Anne H. Muraoka, Tuesday, July 17, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, July 24, 2018

"New needs new techniques. And the modern artists have found new ways and new means of making their statements...the modern painter cannot express this age, the airplane, the atom bomb, the radio, in the old forms of the Renaissance or of any other past culture." - Jackson Pollock

Although written during the infancy of modernism in the United States, Pollock's words still reverberate within the walls of academia. The significance of understanding the past for the purposes of progress in all areas of knowledge have served as fodder for academics, art historians, critics, intellectuals, and even artists. Many universities, both large and small, are shifting the balance of the study of the Renaissance toward favoring the modern and contemporary. In recent years, Renaissance art history and studies have been characterized as "old school" and irrelevant in the modern world. The Humanities, once pioneered and dominated by Renaissance scholars such as Jacob Burkhardt, Heinrich Wölfflin, Erwin Panofsky, Aby Warburg, among others, is today seen as a golden age long past.

The Humanities is measureless and defies definition, as it centers upon the human experience, social and cultural transformation, the quest for knowledge, and individual and collective curiosity. Renaissance studies embody these very pursuits by making connections between art, religion, social history, economics, politics, and even anthropology. Yet, we all have heard these questions from students and even our peers:

- "Why should I study Renaissance art, history, and literature if I intend to specialize in the modern/contemporary?"

- "How can studying Renaissance art contribute to my development as a practicing artist in the twenty-first century?"

- "How can Renaissance studies inform how I view and understand the modern world?"

- "What are the transferable skills obtained through the study of the Renaissance that would benefit me in a discipline or profession outside of art and the Humanities?"

This session aims to: 1) acknowledge the contributions of Renaissance art history and studies in understanding the modern world; 2) introduce and generate new avenues of research in Renaissance art and studies for the twenty-first century; 3) explore new methodologies in teaching Renaissance art and studies, among other related topics.

Paper proposals must include the following:

     Paper title (15-word maximum)

     Abstract (150-word maximum)

     Brief CV (300-word maximum)

     PhD completion date (past or expected)

     Full name, current affiliation, and e-mail address.

Please submit proposals to Anne H. Muraoka (amuraoka@odu.edu) and Marcia B. Hall (marciahall713@gmail.com) by 8 August 2018.

Tags:  image  Renaissance art history  Renaissance culture  Renaissance literature  Renaissance studies  text  visual culture 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Call for Panels: SHARP @ RSA 2019 Deadline 7/30

Posted By Andie Silva, Monday, July 16, 2018

The Society for the History of Authorship, Reading & Publishing (SHARP) will sponsor up to four panels at the Renaissance Society of America’s annual meeting in Toronto, ON on 17-19 March 2019. SHARP @ RSA brings together scholars working on any aspect of the creation, dissemination, and reception of manuscript and print and their digital remediation.

We invite panel submissions that consider English and/or Continental books and manuscripts from 1350 to 1700. Potential topics include print culture, history of the book, authorship, publishing history, ephemera, illustration, publishers’ archives, production, circulation, and reception. Panels addressing digital methodologies for the study of book history are especially welcome. Participants may also submit a roundtable discussion rather than a panel.

Please include all abstracts and brief CVs (up to 4 presenters and a chair/respondent) in a single .DOCX or .PDF document. Sessions may be submitted without a chair; should the submission be accepted, a chair will be assigned by the SHARP liaison or the RSA committee.

Completed session submissions should be emailed to Dr. Andie Silva (asilva[at]york.cuny.edu) by July 30, 2018. Panelists will be contacted with a decision before the formal RSA deadline.

Before submitting, please note the following RSA restrictions: All participants must be current members of RSA in order to present. In order to avoid scheduling conflicts, participants may not give more than one paper, be a discussant in more than one roundtable, or be a respondent in more than one session. A participant may chair up to two sessions. The RSA welcomes graduate student speakers who are within one or two years of defending their dissertations. However, all sessions must include at least one speaker who has received the PhD or other terminal degree. Sessions composed entirely of predoctoral speakers and sessions that include precandidates or MA students will not be considered. Predoctoral speakers should present dissertation research, not term papers. Their CVs must include the dissertation title and expected date of completion to make their eligibility clear to the Program Committee.

Tags:  archival research  archives  authorship  book history  history of reading  history of the book  material culture  print culture  printers  publishers  readers 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Call for Panels: SHARP @ RSA 2019 Deadline 7/30

Posted By Andie Silva, Monday, July 16, 2018

The Society for the History of Authorship, Reading & Publishing (SHARP) will sponsor up to four panels at the Renaissance Society of America’s annual meeting in Toronto, ON on 17-19 March 2019. SHARP @ RSA brings together scholars working on any aspect of the creation, dissemination, and reception of manuscript and print and their digital remediation.

We invite panel submissions that consider English and/or Continental books and manuscripts from 1350 to 1700. Potential topics include print culture, history of the book, authorship, publishing history, ephemera, illustration, publishers’ archives, production, circulation, and reception. Panels addressing digital methodologies for the study of book history are especially welcome. Participants may also submit a roundtable discussion rather than a panel.

Please include all abstracts and brief CVs (up to 4 presenters and a chair/respondent) in a single .DOCX or .PDF document. Sessions may be submitted without a chair; should the submission be accepted, a chair will be assigned by the SHARP liaison or the RSA committee.

Completed session submissions should be emailed to Dr. Andie Silva (asilva[at]york.cuny.edu) by July 30, 2018. Panelists will be contacted with a decision before the formal RSA deadline.

Before submitting, please note the following RSA restrictions: All participants must be current members of RSA in order to present. In order to avoid scheduling conflicts, participants may not give more than one paper, be a discussant in more than one roundtable, or be a respondent in more than one session. A participant may chair up to two sessions. The RSA welcomes graduate student speakers who are within one or two years of defending their dissertations. However, all sessions must include at least one speaker who has received the PhD or other terminal degree. Sessions composed entirely of predoctoral speakers and sessions that include precandidates or MA students will not be considered. Predoctoral speakers should present dissertation research, not term papers. Their CVs must include the dissertation title and expected date of completion to make their eligibility clear to the Program Committee.

Tags:  archival research  archives  authorship  book history  history of reading  history of the book  material culture  print culture  printers  publishers  readers 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Renaissance Vegetarianism - Deadline Extended

Posted By Andrea Crow, Monday, July 16, 2018

The study of early modern food has blossomed in recent years. As scholars have parsed the politics of changing dining practices, the role of recipes in intellectual history, and the growing perception of food ethics as inextricable from social identity, dietary beliefs and habits have begun to be seen as central to early modern studies. One of the most striking dietary trends that spread across Europe in this period, however, remains underexamined: the rise of vegetarianism.


This panel invites papers from across disciplines that examine Renaissance vegetarianism in order to think through the intertwining religious, economic, political, and ethical motives that spurred this transnational movement forward. Possible topics might include views on vegetarianism in the early modern dietary sciences, radical vegetarian leaders and the communities that they organized, vegetarian cuisine and recipe books, the revival of Classical vegetarian thought, or the representation of vegetarianism in literature and the arts.


Proposals should include the presenter’s name, academic affiliation, email address, paper title (15 words maximum), abstract (150 words maximum), and CV (300 words maximum). Please submit proposals by August 1st to Andrea Crow (andrea.crow@bc.edu).

Tags:  art history  ethics  food studies  interdisciplinary  literature  political history  recipe books  vegetarianism 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Milton and the Psalms: A New Look

Posted By Noam Flinker, Saturday, July 14, 2018

Milton and the Psalms: A New Look

The considerable work of Mary Ann Radzinowicz and Barbara Lewalski lays the groundwork for more exploration into specific ways in which Milton made use of the Psalms.  In particular, Lady Radzinowicz’s Milton’s Epics and the Book of Psalms (Princeton, 1989) shows how Milton referred to at least 126 of the 150 psalms and her index makes it possible to determine how contemporary scholars can carry on her work.  This session will examine new ways to consider the implications of Milton’s many references to the Psalter. 

Possible issues for presentations:

To what extent does Milton’s poetry reflect the intertextual echoes of the psalms within the biblical canon?

How do the structures of specific psalmic lyrics interact with Milton’s references to them?

How do the politics of Milton’s prose make use of and echo the psalms to which he refers?

Abstracts for papers that will consider any of these or other related issues should be sent to noamflinker@gmail.com by July 29, 2018.

This panel is guaranteed acceptance through the Medieval and Renaissance Studies Association in Israel.

All proposals should include:   paper title (15-word maximum), abstract (150-word maximum), curriculum vitae (.pdf or .doc upload), PhD completion date (past or expected), general discipline area (Literature, or other), keywords

Tags:  Bible  hermeneutics  intertextuality  John Milton  King David  Psalms 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Classical and Early Modern Epic: Comparative Approaches and New Perspectives

Posted By Caroline G. Stark, Saturday, July 14, 2018

The Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR) welcomes proposals for papers to be delivered at the 2019 meeting of the Renaissance Society of America in Toronto. For one of its four panels, SEMCR invites abstracts on the subject of “Classical and Early Modern Epic: Comparative Approaches and New Perspectives”. In particular, we welcome papers offering reassessments of the current state of the field from cross-cultural and cross-temporal perspectives, or proposing new approaches to the connections between classical and early modern epic using methodologies from philology, digital humanities, cognitive studies, visual studies, or world literature.


In the shadow of a rising nationalism, epic poetry has taken on an ever greater importance through its mediation of national identity and as a focal point of reference and contestation. Even within rarefied scholarly discussions, the study of the genre, like epic itself, can appear to dominate other material, whether less canonical genres or non-Western epic. While the genealogical bonds between classical and early modern epic can seem to strengthen national ideologies and academic conventions, however, the content of the poems often works against such assumptions. Moreover, increasing diversity in research methods and scope, especially through collaboration, enables the scholarly community to renew the study of epic in more expansive and imaginative ways. Our panel aims, therefore, to reflect on the reception of Greco-Roman epic in early modernity partly as a topic in its own right, and partly as a means of understanding more general issues of theory, practice, and canonicity in literature and culture at large.


Proposals responding to recent developments in the scholarship might address, but are not limited to, one of the following questions:


- In light of recent work by Mazzotta, Ramachandran, Laird, and others, how might attention to worldmaking, post-colonial thought, and classical reception in the New World reframe our understanding of the relationship between ancient and early modern epic?


- Does the study of the relationship between classical and early modern epic have anything to gain from comparison with non-Western material, e.g., the Indic tradition? More generally, what are the advantages and disadvantages of analysing these traditions in terms of genealogy, ecology (cf. Beecroft), cosmopolitanism (cf. Pollock), or other systemic relationships?


- What light can cross-disciplinary approaches, especially those using computational tools (cf. Coffee and Bernstein) or cognitive models (cf. Jaén and Simon), shed on continuities and disjunctions between ancient and early modern forms of the genre?


- How did the idea of epic change as a genre during the early modern period, in particular given the different transmission histories of classical epics, especially works in ancient Greek? How might the growing attention to neo-Latin literature affect the fields of epic and/or reception studies?


- Are there developments in the aesthetics of a particular period that shed light on goings-on elsewhere? Besides substantial interest in the sublime (Cheney) and the mock-epic (Rawson), recent work has also focused on the quotidian (Grogan). More generally, what comparative understanding of epic can be gleaned from a study of contemporary critics and theorists, e.g., Horace or Tasso?


- What areas of research in early modern epic might benefit from the contributions of classicists without an extensive background in the field, and vice versa?


The Society is committed to creating a congenial and collaborative forum for the infusion of new ideas into classics and early modern studies, and hence welcomes abstracts that are exploratory in nature as well as abstracts of latter-stage research.


Abstracts of no more than 150 words and a short CV of no more than 300 words should be sent as separate email attachments to caroline.stark@howard.edu (see the RSA's abstract guidelines and CV guidelines and models).  The abstracts will be judged anonymously: please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page.  Proposals must be received by August 10, 2018.


Please include in the body of the email:


• your name, affiliation, email address

• your paper title (15-word maximum)

• relevant keywords

Tags:  classical reception  epic 

Permalink
 

Connecting with the ancients: Philological reception in the Renaissance

Posted By Caroline G. Stark, Friday, July 13, 2018

As an Associate Organization of the Renaissance Society of America, the Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR) invites proposals for papers on classical philology in the Renaissance to be delivered at the 2019 meeting of the Renaissance Society of America in Toronto.


Renaissance engagement with the linguistic and literary culture of antiquity - whether in the form of language study, textual transmission, or translation - constitutes a relatively coherent body of evidence through which to understand the processes of and motivations for ‘receiving’ the classics. Renaissance appropriations of Greek and Latin philology become vehicles of cross-cultural communication in an increasingly divided early modern Europe.  We welcome proposals that highlight the mutual benefits arising from closer engagement between classicists and early modernists on the topic of classical philology in the Renaissance.


The Society is committed to creating a congenial and collaborative forum for the infusion of new ideas into classics and early modern studies, and hence welcomes abstracts that are exploratory in nature as well as abstracts of latter-stage research.


Abstracts of no more than 150 words and a short CV of no more than 300 words should be sent as separate email attachments to caroline.stark@howard.edu (see the RSA's abstract guidelines and CV guidelines and models).  The abstracts will be judged anonymously: please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page.  Proposals must be received by August 10, 2018.


Please include in the body of the email:


• your name, affiliation, email address

• your paper title (15-word maximum)

• relevant keywords

Tags:  classical literature  classical reception  philology  translation  transmission 

Permalink
 
Page 2 of 8
1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8
Membership Software Powered by YourMembership  ::  Legal