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Literature CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
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This blog is for CfPs for sessions in literature for RSA 2019 Toronto. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Top tags: Literature  early modern  gender  book history  Poetry  material culture  print culture  Renaissance literature  drama  Iberian Peninsula  identity  women  epic poetry  history of reading  printers  reception history  religion  archival research  art history  catholic reform  classical literature  classical reception  colonial Latin America  cultural history  devotional  digital humanities  history of the book  interdisciplinary  Italian literature  Italy 

Violence and Trauma in the Early Modern World

Posted By Colin S. Rose, Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Call for Papers for RSA 2019: Violence and Trauma in the Early Modern World

 

Recent historiography has stressed the centrality of violence to early modern history. Interpersonal violence, state violence and military violence have all come under scrutiny for the ways that violence shaped lived experiences and disrupted civil society. This panel seeks to expand on this growing school of thought by asking: how did the trauma wrought by violence and crisis change people’s perspectives on the world around them? Were people inured to its impact, were they fascinated by the danger in their streets, were they deeply troubled by the instability of the world around them? This is an interdisciplinary call for proposals for papers for RSA 2019 Toronto dealing with any aspect of violence and trauma in the early modern world. Papers may address history, literature, art, philosophy or any combination of disciplines present at the RSA in order to build a productive interdisciplinary conversation.

 

Please send:

  • paper title (15-word maximum)
  • abstract (150-word maximum)
  • curriculum vitae (.pdf or .doc upload)
  • PhD completion date (past or expected)
  • full name, current affiliation, and email address

 

to Colin Rose (crose@brocku.ca) by AUGUST 5th 2018

Tags:  Literature  trauma  violence 

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Fraud, Mockery, Jest, and Cony-Catching in the Early Modern Period

Posted By Ani Govjian, Friday, July 20, 2018

Fraud, Mockery, Jest, and Cony-Catching in the Early Modern Period

To what extent is a jest also a lie? Are frauds funny? Taking a cue from “mockery” as mimic, sham, and spoof, this panel is interested in the ways fraud, imposture, and deceit function as ludic entertainment – whether intentionally or as byproduct.

This panel invites submissions that consider the jocularity of fraud, counterfeit, trickery, disguise, quackery, and cozenage. Papers are welcome to explore the theme in regards to:

-  Material culture including trick objects like blow books, mock almanacs, or fraudulent copies of famous works

Gendered experiences of deception or artifice

-  Jestbooks, ludic ballads, mock pamphlets

-  Mountebanks, street performers, gambling games, and pick-pockets

Medicine, especially the preoccupation with quack physicians

Natural philosophy and debates pushing back against charges of superstition

-  Magic, either through a focus on prestidigitation or representations and discussions of witchcraft

Satire

parody

Religious debates including displays of anti-Catholic sentiment and fears as well as fetishizations of “Popery”

-  Theatre, stagecraft, and/or anti-theatrical sentiment

 

Proposals should be for 20-minute papers, and should include:

    title for the paper

    abstract of 150 words

    1-page CV

    current contact information

    A/V requirements

 

Submit proposals to agovjian@live.unc.edu by Friday, August 10, 2018. Subject line: “RSA – Fraud and Mockery.”

 

Tags:  allegory  archival research  book history  drama  early modern  English literature  gender  interdisciplinary  literature  manuscript  material culture  mimesis  Poetry  popular culture  print culture  recipe books  religious  Renaissance literature  Renaissance studies  reproductive prints  truth 

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In Search of the Canon: Poets and Artists Confronting with their Models (c. 1500-1700)

Posted By Maria G. Matarazzo, Thursday, July 19, 2018

The theory of Imitation was a central topic of discussion in the ‘Republic of Letters’. The European community of humanists, philosophers, poets and artists was engaged in the dispute over the models to refer to during the creative process. How to develop a normative canon as a reference point for artists and writers in the practice of Imitation? Which poets and artists to select as the examples of ‘bello stile’?

While the authority of ancient models was universally acknowledged, the building of a canon of modern masters was under discussion. One of the typical environments of this discussion were the Academies, where writers, artists, philosophers, antiquarians gathered around learned patrons.

Considering the interdisciplinary nature of this debate, this panel aims to explore the construction of a canon through a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective. The main purpose is not only to study the mechanisms implied in the building of the canon but also to bring out the intersections between Art and Literature concerning this topic.

Questions to be considered include but are not limited to: the institutions where the debate took place, with a particular focus on the Academies; rhetorical devices for debating the canon and the metaphors of Imitation; the circulation of the canon through publishing, printings, new editions and reproductive printmaking; the impact of the canon on the teaching practices.

 

Please submit proposals to Ida Duretto (ida.duretto@sns.it) and Maria Gabriella Matarazzo (mariagabriella.matarazzo@sns.it) by August 12, 2018.

Proposals should include a paper title, an abstract (150-word maximum), keywords and a CV (300-word maximum).

Tags:  academies  Art History  book history  cultural history  early modern  history of reading  history of the book  Imitation  interdisciplinary  literature  mimesis  patronage  philology  Poetry  print culture  publishers  reproductive prints  the canon  visual arts 

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Jesuit Studies

Posted By Kathleen M. Comerford, Thursday, July 19, 2018
The Journal of Jesuit Studies is looking to organize panels in any aspect of Jesuit studies in any region, up to the year 1700, to include history, literature, art history, music history, or related topics, in all geographical areas.

Individual paper abstracts should be no more than 150 words and should identify up to 5 keywords.  Panel submissions should include the name of a chair who is not also a presenter.  All submissions must include a/v requests and a brief CV (including affiliation, date of PhD completion, general discipline area, rank, and publications or other evidence of scholarship) for each participant.  Please submit to Kathleen Comerford, kcomerfo@georgiasouthern.edu, no later than August 5, 2018.  We will consider panels, individual papers, and roundtables for sponsorship by the Journal of Jesuit Studies.  Sponsorship does not guarantee acceptance to the program and implies no intent to publish.

Tags:  book history  catholic reform  classical literature  classicism  colonial Latin America  devotional  digital humanities  drama  early modern; gender studies; interdisciplinary; l  English literature  epic  French  French literature  frontispizes  German literature  hagiographical  identity  intercultural relations  Italian Renaissance  Italy  literature  manuscript  Neoplatonism  patronage  Poetics  print culture  printers  Psalms  publishers  race studies  readers  Reception  reception history  religion  Renaissance culture  Renaissance literature  representation  reproductive prints  ritual  Scripture  seventeenth century  sexuality  slaves  sodality  Spain  the Indies 

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Renaissance Vegetarianism - Deadline Extended

Posted By Andrea Crow, Monday, July 16, 2018

The study of early modern food has blossomed in recent years. As scholars have parsed the politics of changing dining practices, the role of recipes in intellectual history, and the growing perception of food ethics as inextricable from social identity, dietary beliefs and habits have begun to be seen as central to early modern studies. One of the most striking dietary trends that spread across Europe in this period, however, remains underexamined: the rise of vegetarianism.


This panel invites papers from across disciplines that examine Renaissance vegetarianism in order to think through the intertwining religious, economic, political, and ethical motives that spurred this transnational movement forward. Possible topics might include views on vegetarianism in the early modern dietary sciences, radical vegetarian leaders and the communities that they organized, vegetarian cuisine and recipe books, the revival of Classical vegetarian thought, or the representation of vegetarianism in literature and the arts.


Proposals should include the presenter’s name, academic affiliation, email address, paper title (15 words maximum), abstract (150 words maximum), and CV (300 words maximum). Please submit proposals by August 1st to Andrea Crow (andrea.crow@bc.edu).

Tags:  art history  ethics  food studies  interdisciplinary  literature  political history  recipe books  vegetarianism 

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Imaginative Intersections between Writers and Artists in the Seventeenth Century: New Thoughts on an Old Theme

Posted By Alexandra C. Hoare, Tuesday, July 10, 2018

The fertile intersections between literature and the visual arts in the seventeenth century, which impact upon and give unique shape to the creative outputs of that historical moment, have received a wealth of scholarly attention over the decades. This phenomenon continues to compel and to generate important, fruitful and even ground-breaking discussion within the various disciplines concerned with the literary and the visual/artistic, either by inflecting or overturning long-standing assumptions about the nature of that relationship or by building significantly upon the extant repertoire of topics with which we have become so familiar (among these the ‘ut pictura poesis’ theme). This panel invites papers that contribute meaningfully to this ongoing discussion by seeking to significantly expand, nuance or problematize extant narratives of the ‘text-image’ relationship within the seventeenth century, broadly conceived and approached from diverse disciplinary perspectives. Papers might address one of the following topics:

- new forms of artistic iconography or style that find a basis in contemporary texts

- a consideration of previously neglected or understudied protagonists in artistic and/or literary fields

- overlooked contexts of literary engagement on the part of artists

- the concept of authorship, within the context of seventeenth-century literary and/or artistic practice and theory

- the impact on artistic production of as-yet unknown or alternative forms of text or writing

- relationships between text and image in the context of previously under-researched or new media, in either visual/artistic or literary fields

- text-image connections that appear within new cultural or geographic contexts of creative production in the period

Proposals should include the presenter’s name, academic affiliation, email address, paper title (15 words maximum), abstract (150 words maximum), PhD completion date, and CV (300 words maximum). Please submit proposals by July 30th to Carlo Avilio (carloavilio@gmail.com) and Alex Hoare (alex.hoare@bristol.ac.uk).

Tags:  art  image  literature  poetry  seventeenth century  text 

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Food, Feast, and Famine in Early Modern Iberia and Latin America

Posted By Miguel Martínez, Monday, July 2, 2018
Food studies has been a rapidly growing field in the last couple of decades and has recently yielded important results in the case of early modern Spain and Latin America. This approach has also proven to be a fruitful lens to examine topics such as gender, race, religious and social identity. This panel aims at foregrounding research on the cultural and literary history of foodways. Papers on cookbooks and recipes, feasting, hunger, drinking and taverns, food, body, and race, convent cooking, the material culture of eating and drinking,visual representations of foodstuffs, food, sexuality and eroticism, among many others, are welcome. 

Please send a title (15-word maximum), an abstract (150-word maximum) and a short CV to Miguel Martínez (martinezm@uchicago.edu) by August 1st, 2018.
 

Tags:  colonial Latin America  food studies  Iberian Peninsula  literature  recipe books  Renaissance  visual culture 

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Popular Readers in Early Modern Spain

Posted By Miguel Martínez, Monday, July 2, 2018
Long-established scholarship on the history of reading has shown that, in part due to the printing and educational revolutions, literacy rates increased dramatically in Renaissance Spain. One of the most remarkable aspects of this moment in the history of literacy is that the ability to read and write spread widely among many different social groups, including the common people. This panel invites papers on artisans, servants, peasants, soldiers, shopkeepers, etc. as consumers of texts in early modern Spain. It welcomes papers on topics such as collective reading, individual readers and book owners, appropriation, partial literacies, mass consumption, public writing and street readers, among many others. Since gender was even more determinant a factor to illiteracy than class in the early modern period, proposals on the reading practices of common women are specially welcome.

Please send a title (15-word maximum), an abstract (150-word maximum) and a short CV to Miguel Martínez (martinezm@uchicago.edu) by August 1st, 2018.
 

Tags:  circulation  cultural history  history of reading  Iberian Peninsula  literature  popular culture  print culture  Spain 

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More Than Merely Passive: Addressing the Early Modern Audience

Posted By John R. Decker, Monday, July 2, 2018
Updated: Monday, July 9, 2018

“… so that the learned may savor the profundity of the allegory while the humble may profit from the lightness of the story” (de modo praedicandi)

 

Early modern audiences were not homogenous. Differences in status, education, language, wealth, and experience (to name only a few) could influence how a group of people, or a particular person, received and made sense of sermons, public proclamations, images, objects, and spaces. The ways in which images, objects, proclamations, etc. were framed and executed could have a serious impact on their relevance and effectiveness. This session seeks papers that investigate the ways in which authors, artists, preachers, theologians, and civic or court officials took account of and encoded pluriform audiences in their works. Topics might consider, but are not limited to, questions such as: What sorts of strategies were employed to take into account multiple ‘levels’ of audience? How well did such strategies work? What were the consequences—possible or actual—when they failed? Please submit an abstract and CV by no later than 30 July, 2018 to: jdecker@pratt.edu.

Tags:  art history  artists  collaboration  cultural history  gender  identity  images  imagination  invention  literature  material culture  patronage  religious communities  representation  social history  urban spaces  urbanism  visual arts  visual communication  visual culture 

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Devotional Materiality in Early Modern England

Posted By Jantina Ellens, Saturday, June 30, 2018

Seeking papers to complete a panel on material manifestations of Protestant faith in early modern England to be presented at the annual meeting of the Renaissance Society of America, Toronto, March 17-19, 2019.


This panel considers how Protestant worship practices are tied to the material world. How do the physical qualities of worship influence the stereotypically “cerebral” qualities of the Protestant faith? How is the divide between public and private worship complicated by the physicality of devotion? Panelists might approach these questions by considering how Protestant devotional practices involve the body or what role texts play balancing the spiritual and the physical in Protestant devotion? They might also consider:

  • Descriptions of protestant devotional practices

  • The physicality of liturgies and/or devotional texts

  • Calvinist materiality

  • The gendering of devotional practices


Please email paper proposals, including a title and abstract of 100-150 words, as well as a one page CV (300 words) to Jantina Ellens (ellensjc@mcmaster.ca) by Sunday, July 8, 2018.

Tags:  bodies  body  book history  Calvinism  catholic reform  classical literature  devotion  devotional  early modern  gender  gender studies  identity  literature  material culture  poetry  religion  religious  religious poetry  Renaissance literature  women 

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