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Literature CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
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This blog is for CfPs for sessions in literature for RSA 2019 Toronto. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Top tags: Literature  early modern  gender  book history  Poetry  material culture  print culture  Renaissance literature  drama  Iberian Peninsula  identity  women  epic poetry  history of reading  printers  reception history  religion  archival research  art history  catholic reform  classical literature  classical reception  colonial Latin America  cultural history  devotional  digital humanities  history of the book  interdisciplinary  Italian literature  Italy 

Printing, Reception, Editing, and Teaching Thomas More and Early Humanists

Posted By Emily A. Ransom, Tuesday, July 24, 2018

The Amici Thomae Mori is excited to welcome proposals for papers on Thomas More studies to coincide with the publication of the new Essential Works of Thomas More (Yale University Press, 2019).  This single-volume, accessible, readable edition will be the third major collection of More’s works in nearly five hundred years, after the 1557 Workes published by More’s nephew William Rastell and the Yale Complete Works in fifteen volumes completed in 1997. Though papers on all areas of Thomas More studies will be considered, the Amici is especially interested in topics that will complement this important publication, such as print history of humanist texts, reception history of Thomas More and early humanists, editing humanist texts, and teaching humanist texts in the modern classroom.

To submit a paper, please send your title (15-word max), abstract (150-word max), a few keywords, CV, PhD completion date (past or expected), and affiliation to Emily Ransom (ransome@uwgb.edu) by August 10, 2018.  

Tags:  archival research  archives  book history  catholic reform  circulation  devotion  devotional  editing  hagiographical  history of the book  manuscript  Manuscript Culture  networks  pedagogy  print culture  printers  readers  Reception  reception history  transmission  women; hagiography 

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Fraud, Mockery, Jest, and Cony-Catching in the Early Modern Period

Posted By Ani Govjian, Friday, July 20, 2018

Fraud, Mockery, Jest, and Cony-Catching in the Early Modern Period

To what extent is a jest also a lie? Are frauds funny? Taking a cue from “mockery” as mimic, sham, and spoof, this panel is interested in the ways fraud, imposture, and deceit function as ludic entertainment – whether intentionally or as byproduct.

This panel invites submissions that consider the jocularity of fraud, counterfeit, trickery, disguise, quackery, and cozenage. Papers are welcome to explore the theme in regards to:

-  Material culture including trick objects like blow books, mock almanacs, or fraudulent copies of famous works

Gendered experiences of deception or artifice

-  Jestbooks, ludic ballads, mock pamphlets

-  Mountebanks, street performers, gambling games, and pick-pockets

Medicine, especially the preoccupation with quack physicians

Natural philosophy and debates pushing back against charges of superstition

-  Magic, either through a focus on prestidigitation or representations and discussions of witchcraft

Satire

parody

Religious debates including displays of anti-Catholic sentiment and fears as well as fetishizations of “Popery”

-  Theatre, stagecraft, and/or anti-theatrical sentiment

 

Proposals should be for 20-minute papers, and should include:

    title for the paper

    abstract of 150 words

    1-page CV

    current contact information

    A/V requirements

 

Submit proposals to agovjian@live.unc.edu by Friday, August 10, 2018. Subject line: “RSA – Fraud and Mockery.”

 

Tags:  allegory  archival research  book history  drama  early modern  English literature  gender  interdisciplinary  literature  manuscript  material culture  mimesis  Poetry  popular culture  print culture  recipe books  religious  Renaissance literature  Renaissance studies  reproductive prints  truth 

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In Search of the Canon: Poets and Artists Confronting with their Models (c. 1500-1700)

Posted By Maria G. Matarazzo, Thursday, July 19, 2018

The theory of Imitation was a central topic of discussion in the ‘Republic of Letters’. The European community of humanists, philosophers, poets and artists was engaged in the dispute over the models to refer to during the creative process. How to develop a normative canon as a reference point for artists and writers in the practice of Imitation? Which poets and artists to select as the examples of ‘bello stile’?

While the authority of ancient models was universally acknowledged, the building of a canon of modern masters was under discussion. One of the typical environments of this discussion were the Academies, where writers, artists, philosophers, antiquarians gathered around learned patrons.

Considering the interdisciplinary nature of this debate, this panel aims to explore the construction of a canon through a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective. The main purpose is not only to study the mechanisms implied in the building of the canon but also to bring out the intersections between Art and Literature concerning this topic.

Questions to be considered include but are not limited to: the institutions where the debate took place, with a particular focus on the Academies; rhetorical devices for debating the canon and the metaphors of Imitation; the circulation of the canon through publishing, printings, new editions and reproductive printmaking; the impact of the canon on the teaching practices.

 

Please submit proposals to Ida Duretto (ida.duretto@sns.it) and Maria Gabriella Matarazzo (mariagabriella.matarazzo@sns.it) by August 12, 2018.

Proposals should include a paper title, an abstract (150-word maximum), keywords and a CV (300-word maximum).

Tags:  academies  Art History  book history  cultural history  early modern  history of reading  history of the book  Imitation  interdisciplinary  literature  mimesis  patronage  philology  Poetry  print culture  publishers  reproductive prints  the canon  visual arts 

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Jesuit Studies

Posted By Kathleen M. Comerford, Thursday, July 19, 2018
The Journal of Jesuit Studies is looking to organize panels in any aspect of Jesuit studies in any region, up to the year 1700, to include history, literature, art history, music history, or related topics, in all geographical areas.

Individual paper abstracts should be no more than 150 words and should identify up to 5 keywords.  Panel submissions should include the name of a chair who is not also a presenter.  All submissions must include a/v requests and a brief CV (including affiliation, date of PhD completion, general discipline area, rank, and publications or other evidence of scholarship) for each participant.  Please submit to Kathleen Comerford, kcomerfo@georgiasouthern.edu, no later than August 5, 2018.  We will consider panels, individual papers, and roundtables for sponsorship by the Journal of Jesuit Studies.  Sponsorship does not guarantee acceptance to the program and implies no intent to publish.

Tags:  book history  catholic reform  classical literature  classicism  colonial Latin America  devotional  digital humanities  drama  early modern; gender studies; interdisciplinary; l  English literature  epic  French  French literature  frontispizes  German literature  hagiographical  identity  intercultural relations  Italian Renaissance  Italy  literature  manuscript  Neoplatonism  patronage  Poetics  print culture  printers  Psalms  publishers  race studies  readers  Reception  reception history  religion  Renaissance culture  Renaissance literature  representation  reproductive prints  ritual  Scripture  seventeenth century  sexuality  slaves  sodality  Spain  the Indies 

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Call for Panels: SHARP @ RSA 2019 Deadline 7/30

Posted By Andie Silva, Monday, July 16, 2018

The Society for the History of Authorship, Reading & Publishing (SHARP) will sponsor up to four panels at the Renaissance Society of America’s annual meeting in Toronto, ON on 17-19 March 2019. SHARP @ RSA brings together scholars working on any aspect of the creation, dissemination, and reception of manuscript and print and their digital remediation.

We invite panel submissions that consider English and/or Continental books and manuscripts from 1350 to 1700. Potential topics include print culture, history of the book, authorship, publishing history, ephemera, illustration, publishers’ archives, production, circulation, and reception. Panels addressing digital methodologies for the study of book history are especially welcome. Participants may also submit a roundtable discussion rather than a panel.

Please include all abstracts and brief CVs (up to 4 presenters and a chair/respondent) in a single .DOCX or .PDF document. Sessions may be submitted without a chair; should the submission be accepted, a chair will be assigned by the SHARP liaison or the RSA committee.

Completed session submissions should be emailed to Dr. Andie Silva (asilva[at]york.cuny.edu) by July 30, 2018. Panelists will be contacted with a decision before the formal RSA deadline.

Before submitting, please note the following RSA restrictions: All participants must be current members of RSA in order to present. In order to avoid scheduling conflicts, participants may not give more than one paper, be a discussant in more than one roundtable, or be a respondent in more than one session. A participant may chair up to two sessions. The RSA welcomes graduate student speakers who are within one or two years of defending their dissertations. However, all sessions must include at least one speaker who has received the PhD or other terminal degree. Sessions composed entirely of predoctoral speakers and sessions that include precandidates or MA students will not be considered. Predoctoral speakers should present dissertation research, not term papers. Their CVs must include the dissertation title and expected date of completion to make their eligibility clear to the Program Committee.

Tags:  archival research  archives  authorship  book history  history of reading  history of the book  material culture  print culture  printers  publishers  readers 

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Call for Panels: SHARP @ RSA 2019 Deadline 7/30

Posted By Andie Silva, Monday, July 16, 2018

The Society for the History of Authorship, Reading & Publishing (SHARP) will sponsor up to four panels at the Renaissance Society of America’s annual meeting in Toronto, ON on 17-19 March 2019. SHARP @ RSA brings together scholars working on any aspect of the creation, dissemination, and reception of manuscript and print and their digital remediation.

We invite panel submissions that consider English and/or Continental books and manuscripts from 1350 to 1700. Potential topics include print culture, history of the book, authorship, publishing history, ephemera, illustration, publishers’ archives, production, circulation, and reception. Panels addressing digital methodologies for the study of book history are especially welcome. Participants may also submit a roundtable discussion rather than a panel.

Please include all abstracts and brief CVs (up to 4 presenters and a chair/respondent) in a single .DOCX or .PDF document. Sessions may be submitted without a chair; should the submission be accepted, a chair will be assigned by the SHARP liaison or the RSA committee.

Completed session submissions should be emailed to Dr. Andie Silva (asilva[at]york.cuny.edu) by July 30, 2018. Panelists will be contacted with a decision before the formal RSA deadline.

Before submitting, please note the following RSA restrictions: All participants must be current members of RSA in order to present. In order to avoid scheduling conflicts, participants may not give more than one paper, be a discussant in more than one roundtable, or be a respondent in more than one session. A participant may chair up to two sessions. The RSA welcomes graduate student speakers who are within one or two years of defending their dissertations. However, all sessions must include at least one speaker who has received the PhD or other terminal degree. Sessions composed entirely of predoctoral speakers and sessions that include precandidates or MA students will not be considered. Predoctoral speakers should present dissertation research, not term papers. Their CVs must include the dissertation title and expected date of completion to make their eligibility clear to the Program Committee.

Tags:  archival research  archives  authorship  book history  history of reading  history of the book  material culture  print culture  printers  publishers  readers 

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Devotional Materiality in Early Modern England

Posted By Jantina Ellens, Saturday, June 30, 2018

Seeking papers to complete a panel on material manifestations of Protestant faith in early modern England to be presented at the annual meeting of the Renaissance Society of America, Toronto, March 17-19, 2019.


This panel considers how Protestant worship practices are tied to the material world. How do the physical qualities of worship influence the stereotypically “cerebral” qualities of the Protestant faith? How is the divide between public and private worship complicated by the physicality of devotion? Panelists might approach these questions by considering how Protestant devotional practices involve the body or what role texts play balancing the spiritual and the physical in Protestant devotion? They might also consider:

  • Descriptions of protestant devotional practices

  • The physicality of liturgies and/or devotional texts

  • Calvinist materiality

  • The gendering of devotional practices


Please email paper proposals, including a title and abstract of 100-150 words, as well as a one page CV (300 words) to Jantina Ellens (ellensjc@mcmaster.ca) by Sunday, July 8, 2018.

Tags:  bodies  body  book history  Calvinism  catholic reform  classical literature  devotion  devotional  early modern  gender  gender studies  identity  literature  material culture  poetry  religion  religious  religious poetry  Renaissance literature  women 

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Character beyond Shakespeare

Posted By Harry Newman, Thursday, June 7, 2018
Updated: Thursday, June 7, 2018

Despite the rise of new character criticism and other important movements (e.g. new materialism, the history of emotions, digital humanities), early modern scholarship on character remains dominated by Shakespeare’s plays and their dramatis personae. “Non-Shakespearean” character and characterization tend to be judged according to “Shakespearean” models of “interiority”, “individuation” and “depth”. Narratives of the historical development of character continue to focus on ground broken by Shakespeare, especially at the turn of the seventeenth century, with plays such as Julius Caesar and Hamlet still reigning supreme as game-changers.

This panel invites papers that investigate non-Shakespearean models and paradigms of character in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England, whether in dramatic, non-dramatic or non-literary contexts. Papers might consider the following:

·         What are the significance of characterization techniques developed by playwrights such as Thomas Kyd, John Marston, Francis Beaumont, John Fletcher, Thomas Heywood, Thomas Middleton and Philip Massinger?
·         How does character work in non-dramatic genres such poetry, historiography and life-writing? How were notions of fictional persons shaped—for example—by the rise of English prose fiction from the 1560s, the vogue for sonnets and epigrams in the 1590s, and the popularity of “character” books from the 1610s?
·         Do neglected or derided types of character need to be (re)assessed, such as allegorical characters, bit parts or “extras”, animal characters, humoral personalities, and co-authored characters?
·         What is the importance of authors who write across genres such as George Gascoigne, Robert Greene, John Lyly, Thomas Dekker, Thomas Nashe and John Webster, female authors such as Isabella Whitney, Mary Wroth, Aemilia Lanyer, Mary Sidney, Anne Clifford and Margaret Cavendish, or non-authorial agents of character-creation such as stationers, scribes, patrons, actors, audiences and readers?
·         What are the roles of character and impersonation in “non-literary” texts, such as sermons, medical manuals and conduct books, or even “non-textual” forms in material and visual culture (e.g. paintings, architecture, emblems, jewellery, gaming cards & tokens)?
·         How does the lexicon of character and characterization (e.g. charactery, personation, passionating, inwardness) develop outside the Shakespeare canon?
·         How are digital media creating new access to and new forms of interaction with early modern characters beyond the Shakespeare canon?


Papers may discuss Shakespearean drama, but must do so in relation to other early modern authors, genres or forms. Non-traditional and experimental approaches are encouraged, as are alternative historical narratives that challenge Shakespeare’s place at the epicentre of early modern character criticism. Proposals are welcome from scholars working in any discipline.

Please submit your paper proposal by 15th July 2018 to Harry Newman at harry.newman@rhul.ac.uk. The proposal should include:

·         Name, affiliation and email address
·         Paper title (15 words max)
·         Abstract (150 words max)
·         Keywords
·         Curriculum vitae (300 words max)

Tags:  book history  character  digital humanities  drama  early modern  literature  material culture  Shakespeare  the canon  the non-Shakespearean 

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Manuscript Lyric

Posted By Jaime L. Goodrich, Tuesday, June 5, 2018

The Renaissance English Text Society invites papers on "Manuscript Lyric" for the 2019 annual meeting of the Renaissance Society of America in Toronto.  The topic is purposely open-ended in order to encourage a range of approaches to the early modern circulation of lyric poetry in manuscript.  In keeping with the Renaissance English Text Society's mission to publish editions of early modern texts, papers that emphasize editing, textual criticism, history of the book, or circulation networks are especially welcome.

 

Anyone interested in submitting a proposal for this panel should send a 150-word abstract and a CV to Mary Ellen Lamb (maryelamb@aol.com) and Jaime Goodrich (goodrija@wayne.edu) by 1 July 2018.

Tags:  book history  circulation  editing  lyric  manuscript  networks  poetry  textual criticism 

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Books and Bodies in Early Modern England

Posted By Jillian Linster, Monday, June 4, 2018

Organizers: Jillian Linster (University of South Dakota) and Harry Newman (Royal Holloway, University of London)

This panel investigates links between literary and medical culture in early modern England (c. 1500-1700), focusing on the intersections of book history and medical humanities. Scholarship has started to address the physiology of reading, the role of the book trade in disseminating and shaping medical knowledge, and the mutually influential relationship between literary and medical texts. Building on this work, we seek papers focused on the physical and conceptual relationships between books and bodies in early modernity. Papers might consider the following:

·      How did changing technologies, laws, reading habits, and/or the rise of print culture affect the interaction of bodies and books in this period?

·      How did specific books come to represent individual people, and vice versa?

·      How were the bodies of books shaped and reshaped by physical encounters with human bodies (e.g. printers, book binders, readers)?

·      Does the relationship between books and bodies help us to understand power and agency in early modernity?

·      Why is it important to investigate the material lives and textual histories of medical books (anatomical works, midwifery manuals, dietaries, casebooks, herbals, medical receipt books, etc.)?

·      How is the relationship between books and bodies depicted in literary works, artistic renderings, and historical documents from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries?

·      How useful are distinctions between ‘literary’ and ‘medical’ texts when considering the book-body relationship?

·      What was the influence of other cultures (European or non-Western) on English perceptions of books and bodies?

Approaches might include or combine book history, medical humanities, ecocriticism, new materialism, sociological or anthropological theory, social and cultural history, and biblical studies. Non-traditional or experimental lines of inquiry are encouraged. Proposals are welcome from scholars working in any discipline.

Please submit your paper proposal by 15th July 2018, to Jillian Linster and Harry Newman at booksandbodies.panel@gmail.com. The proposal should include the following information in a single document:

·      Name, affiliation and email address

·      Paper title (15 words max)

·      Abstract (150 words max)

·      Keywords

Tags:  book history  early modern  gender  history  literature  material culture  religion 

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