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Literature CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
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This blog is for CfPs for sessions in literature for RSA 2019 Toronto. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Top tags: Literature  early modern  gender  book history  Poetry  material culture  print culture  Renaissance literature  drama  Iberian Peninsula  identity  women  epic poetry  history of reading  printers  reception history  religion  archival research  art history  catholic reform  classical literature  classical reception  colonial Latin America  cultural history  devotional  digital humanities  history of the book  interdisciplinary  Italian literature  Italy 

Jesuit Studies

Posted By Kathleen M. Comerford, Thursday, July 19, 2018
The Journal of Jesuit Studies is looking to organize panels in any aspect of Jesuit studies in any region, up to the year 1700, to include history, literature, art history, music history, or related topics, in all geographical areas.

Individual paper abstracts should be no more than 150 words and should identify up to 5 keywords.  Panel submissions should include the name of a chair who is not also a presenter.  All submissions must include a/v requests and a brief CV (including affiliation, date of PhD completion, general discipline area, rank, and publications or other evidence of scholarship) for each participant.  Please submit to Kathleen Comerford, kcomerfo@georgiasouthern.edu, no later than August 5, 2018.  We will consider panels, individual papers, and roundtables for sponsorship by the Journal of Jesuit Studies.  Sponsorship does not guarantee acceptance to the program and implies no intent to publish.

Tags:  book history  catholic reform  classical literature  classicism  colonial Latin America  devotional  digital humanities  drama  early modern; gender studies; interdisciplinary; l  English literature  epic  French  French literature  frontispizes  German literature  hagiographical  identity  intercultural relations  Italian Renaissance  Italy  literature  manuscript  Neoplatonism  patronage  Poetics  print culture  printers  Psalms  publishers  race studies  readers  Reception  reception history  religion  Renaissance culture  Renaissance literature  representation  reproductive prints  ritual  Scripture  seventeenth century  sexuality  slaves  sodality  Spain  the Indies 

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Character beyond Shakespeare

Posted By Harry Newman, Thursday, June 7, 2018
Updated: Thursday, June 7, 2018

Despite the rise of new character criticism and other important movements (e.g. new materialism, the history of emotions, digital humanities), early modern scholarship on character remains dominated by Shakespeare’s plays and their dramatis personae. “Non-Shakespearean” character and characterization tend to be judged according to “Shakespearean” models of “interiority”, “individuation” and “depth”. Narratives of the historical development of character continue to focus on ground broken by Shakespeare, especially at the turn of the seventeenth century, with plays such as Julius Caesar and Hamlet still reigning supreme as game-changers.

This panel invites papers that investigate non-Shakespearean models and paradigms of character in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England, whether in dramatic, non-dramatic or non-literary contexts. Papers might consider the following:

·         What are the significance of characterization techniques developed by playwrights such as Thomas Kyd, John Marston, Francis Beaumont, John Fletcher, Thomas Heywood, Thomas Middleton and Philip Massinger?
·         How does character work in non-dramatic genres such poetry, historiography and life-writing? How were notions of fictional persons shaped—for example—by the rise of English prose fiction from the 1560s, the vogue for sonnets and epigrams in the 1590s, and the popularity of “character” books from the 1610s?
·         Do neglected or derided types of character need to be (re)assessed, such as allegorical characters, bit parts or “extras”, animal characters, humoral personalities, and co-authored characters?
·         What is the importance of authors who write across genres such as George Gascoigne, Robert Greene, John Lyly, Thomas Dekker, Thomas Nashe and John Webster, female authors such as Isabella Whitney, Mary Wroth, Aemilia Lanyer, Mary Sidney, Anne Clifford and Margaret Cavendish, or non-authorial agents of character-creation such as stationers, scribes, patrons, actors, audiences and readers?
·         What are the roles of character and impersonation in “non-literary” texts, such as sermons, medical manuals and conduct books, or even “non-textual” forms in material and visual culture (e.g. paintings, architecture, emblems, jewellery, gaming cards & tokens)?
·         How does the lexicon of character and characterization (e.g. charactery, personation, passionating, inwardness) develop outside the Shakespeare canon?
·         How are digital media creating new access to and new forms of interaction with early modern characters beyond the Shakespeare canon?


Papers may discuss Shakespearean drama, but must do so in relation to other early modern authors, genres or forms. Non-traditional and experimental approaches are encouraged, as are alternative historical narratives that challenge Shakespeare’s place at the epicentre of early modern character criticism. Proposals are welcome from scholars working in any discipline.

Please submit your paper proposal by 15th July 2018 to Harry Newman at harry.newman@rhul.ac.uk. The proposal should include:

·         Name, affiliation and email address
·         Paper title (15 words max)
·         Abstract (150 words max)
·         Keywords
·         Curriculum vitae (300 words max)

Tags:  book history  character  digital humanities  drama  early modern  literature  material culture  Shakespeare  the canon  the non-Shakespearean 

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Natural Contracts in the French Renaissance (CFP, Toronto)

Posted By Phillip J. Usher, Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Natural Contracts in the French Renaissance (Proposed French Discipline Sponsored Panel)

Beginning with his discussion of Goya’s “Fight with Cudgels,” Michel Serres in his Natural Contract brings attention to “the marsh” into which the (purely human) struggle “sinks.” More generally, Serres’s text opens out onto a new emphasis on the “world of things themselves” and onto the proposition of negotiating not only a “social contract” but also a “natural one.” Paper proposals are sought for a panel of three papers on “Natural Contracts in the French Renaissance,” to take place at the RSA in Toronto (2019). The goal will be to foreground continuities (and productive tensions) between early modern France and specifically French éco-penseurs such as Michel Serres, to see how various texts of early modern France sketched out possible drafts of “natural contracts.” Participants might take up any genre of text, including but not limited to literature, botany, anatomy, etc. Please send a title, a 100-word abstract, and a short bio to Phillip John Usher (pu8@nyu.edu) by July 15, 2018.

Tags:  digital humanities  French  literature 

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Call for Proposals: New Technologies and Renaissance Studies

Posted By Raymond Siemens, Tuesday, April 17, 2018

RSA 2019, 17–19 March, Toronto

Since 2001, the Renaissance Society of America Annual Meetings have featured panels on the applications of new technology in scholarly research, publishing, and teaching. Panels at the 2019 meeting will continue to explore the contributions made by new and emerging methodologies and the projects that employ them.

For 2019, we welcome proposals for papers, lightning talks, panels, and or poster / demonstration / workshop presentations on new technologies and their impact on research, teaching, publishing, and beyond, in the context of Renaissance Studies. Examples of the many areas considered by members of our community can be found in the list of papers presented at the RSA since 2001 (http://bit.ly/1tn6rsd) and in those papers published thus far under the heading of New Technologies and Renaissance Studies (http://bit.ly/1zJiaqp).

Please send proposals before 30 April 2018 to Iter.RSA.NewTechnologies@gmail.com. Your proposal should include a title, a 150-word abstract, and a one-paragraph biographical CV, as well as an indication of whether you would consider or prefer an online presentation.

We are pleased to be able to offer travel subventions on a competitive basis to graduate students who present on these panels; those wishing to be considered for a subvention should indicate this in their abstract submission.

We thank Iter: Gateway to the Middle Ages & Renaissance (http://www.itergateway.org) for its generous sponsorship of this series and its related travel subventions since 2001.

Tags:  digital humanities 

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