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Literature CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
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This blog is for CfPs for sessions in literature for RSA 2019 Toronto. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Top tags: Literature  early modern  gender  book history  Poetry  material culture  print culture  Renaissance literature  drama  Iberian Peninsula  identity  women  epic poetry  history of reading  printers  reception history  religion  archival research  art history  catholic reform  classical literature  classical reception  colonial Latin America  cultural history  devotional  digital humanities  history of the book  interdisciplinary  Italian literature  Italy 

Jesuit Studies

Posted By Kathleen M. Comerford, Thursday, July 19, 2018
The Journal of Jesuit Studies is looking to organize panels in any aspect of Jesuit studies in any region, up to the year 1700, to include history, literature, art history, music history, or related topics, in all geographical areas.

Individual paper abstracts should be no more than 150 words and should identify up to 5 keywords.  Panel submissions should include the name of a chair who is not also a presenter.  All submissions must include a/v requests and a brief CV (including affiliation, date of PhD completion, general discipline area, rank, and publications or other evidence of scholarship) for each participant.  Please submit to Kathleen Comerford, kcomerfo@georgiasouthern.edu, no later than August 5, 2018.  We will consider panels, individual papers, and roundtables for sponsorship by the Journal of Jesuit Studies.  Sponsorship does not guarantee acceptance to the program and implies no intent to publish.

Tags:  book history  catholic reform  classical literature  classicism  colonial Latin America  devotional  digital humanities  drama  early modern; gender studies; interdisciplinary; l  English literature  epic  French  French literature  frontispizes  German literature  hagiographical  identity  intercultural relations  Italian Renaissance  Italy  literature  manuscript  Neoplatonism  patronage  Poetics  print culture  printers  Psalms  publishers  race studies  readers  Reception  reception history  religion  Renaissance culture  Renaissance literature  representation  reproductive prints  ritual  Scripture  seventeenth century  sexuality  slaves  sodality  Spain  the Indies 

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Ancient Enmities: Classicism and Religious Others

Posted By Caroline G. Stark, Friday, July 13, 2018

Renaissance Europe sought to define itself in relation to multiple models, prominent among which were ancient Greco-Roman culture and contemporary non-Christian (as well as Christian heterodox) cultures. The Humanist emulation of classical ideals in text and image occurred within a larger context of religious, ethnic, and frequently military interactions: the expansion of the Ottoman Empire, harassment from North African Corsairs, mass migrations of Jews, and internecine tensions resulting from the Protestant Reformation. The “classical” provided a discourse through which scholars and artists could negotiate a religious, national, or pan-European identity transhistorical in scope yet ultimately presentist in defining “the other”. This panel seeks to explore the function of the classical and classicism across these identities in both textual and material sources.

Points of contact between classical culture and religious others turned antiquity into a battleground of competing traditions. Underlying such tensions was a longstanding sense dating from Homer and Herodotus onwards of classical identity as culturally and geographically contested, its meaning located variously in Western Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Near East. Both as traces of ancient ethnographies and as largely presentist rhetoric, projections of classical identity in the Renaissance could be deployed in numerous and diverse ways. Trojan ancestry was claimed not only by various European noble lines, such as the Habsburgs and the Estes of Ferrara, but also by the Turks. Orthodox Greeks under Ottoman rule were ostracized as the barbaric descendants of their enlightened ancestors. Antiquarians in post-Reconquest Spain invented Roman origins to Andalusi architectural marvels, while Roman ruins in North Africa and the Ottoman Empire, represented both visually and through ekphrastic description, fueled dreams of European conquest. At the same time, the means by which the classical past were known could be diminished or lost: despite its importance during the Medieval period for accessing intellectual traditions, for example, Arabic struggled to maintain its place in European scholarship as a learned language alongside classical Greek and Latin, and even as other distant foreign traditions, such as Egyptian Hermeticism, fascinated artists and scholars.

The panel addresses two areas that have been the focus of recent research in Renaissance studies: intercultural relations and concepts of temporality. While the importance of the classics for European identity has been extensively studied, their role in defining what lay beyond Europe’s margins has received less attention. Some scholarship, however, has shown the potential richness of the field: Craig Kallendorf’s reading of the Aeneid’s portrayal of colonized entities (The Other Virgil, 2007), for example, and Nancy Bisaha’s study of the competing portrayals of the Ottoman Turks as either Goths, Vandals, Scythians or heirs to the Trojans and Romans (Creating East and West, 2006). Furthermore, the panel seeks to understand the temporal and explanatory concepts undergirding various early modern genealogies, ethnographies, and histories. Although a topic of theory since Warburg, the problem of time and temporal relations in early modernity has received renewed attention with the publication of Nagel and Wood’s Anachronic Renaissance (2010). Applied beyond the original domain of art history, Nagel and Wood’s ideas prompt a wider re-evaluation of the importance of antiquity in framing our understanding of Renaissance Europe. At stake is a view of the central conflicts in Europe’s formative years not as exclusively early modern events, but rather as events crucially shaped by the vital force of classicism.

Potential topics include:

-- How did differing claims to Greco-Roman heritage shape religious rhetoric and antagonisms? How did the interpretation of classical texts evolve with the shifting needs of their early modern readers, either in marginalizing or legitimizing particular groups? How do these texts transcend class lines, especially among the uneducated and illiterate?

-- How did different national traditions of Humanism approach the contrasting degrees of religious alterity? How did classical writings and thought provide agency for marginalized groups?

-- How can a deeper knowledge of classical texts reshape historical understandings of crusades, jihads, reformations, expulsions, and heresies? In teaching these encounters, what pedagogical methodologies can guide students toward recognition of the pervasive relevance of these texts?


Abstracts of no more than 150 words and a short CV should be sent as separate email attachments to pramit.chaudhuri@austin.utexas.edu (please see RSA guidelines for abstracts and CVs). Abstracts will be judged anonymously, so please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page.  Please include the following in the body of your email:

• your name, affiliation, email address

• your paper title (15-word maximum)

• relevant keywords

Proposals must be received by August 10, 2018.


Organized by David M. Reher (University of Chicago) and Keith Budner (UC-Berkeley) with the sponsorship of the Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR)

Tags:  classical reception  classicism  ethnographies  genealogies  histories  identity  intercultural relations  marginal  temporality  the other 

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More Than Merely Passive: Addressing the Early Modern Audience

Posted By John R. Decker, Monday, July 2, 2018
Updated: Monday, July 9, 2018

“… so that the learned may savor the profundity of the allegory while the humble may profit from the lightness of the story” (de modo praedicandi)

 

Early modern audiences were not homogenous. Differences in status, education, language, wealth, and experience (to name only a few) could influence how a group of people, or a particular person, received and made sense of sermons, public proclamations, images, objects, and spaces. The ways in which images, objects, proclamations, etc. were framed and executed could have a serious impact on their relevance and effectiveness. This session seeks papers that investigate the ways in which authors, artists, preachers, theologians, and civic or court officials took account of and encoded pluriform audiences in their works. Topics might consider, but are not limited to, questions such as: What sorts of strategies were employed to take into account multiple ‘levels’ of audience? How well did such strategies work? What were the consequences—possible or actual—when they failed? Please submit an abstract and CV by no later than 30 July, 2018 to: jdecker@pratt.edu.

Tags:  art history  artists  collaboration  cultural history  gender  identity  images  imagination  invention  literature  material culture  patronage  religious communities  representation  social history  urban spaces  urbanism  visual arts  visual communication  visual culture 

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Devotional Materiality in Early Modern England

Posted By Jantina Ellens, Saturday, June 30, 2018

Seeking papers to complete a panel on material manifestations of Protestant faith in early modern England to be presented at the annual meeting of the Renaissance Society of America, Toronto, March 17-19, 2019.


This panel considers how Protestant worship practices are tied to the material world. How do the physical qualities of worship influence the stereotypically “cerebral” qualities of the Protestant faith? How is the divide between public and private worship complicated by the physicality of devotion? Panelists might approach these questions by considering how Protestant devotional practices involve the body or what role texts play balancing the spiritual and the physical in Protestant devotion? They might also consider:

  • Descriptions of protestant devotional practices

  • The physicality of liturgies and/or devotional texts

  • Calvinist materiality

  • The gendering of devotional practices


Please email paper proposals, including a title and abstract of 100-150 words, as well as a one page CV (300 words) to Jantina Ellens (ellensjc@mcmaster.ca) by Sunday, July 8, 2018.

Tags:  bodies  body  book history  Calvinism  catholic reform  classical literature  devotion  devotional  early modern  gender  gender studies  identity  literature  material culture  poetry  religion  religious  religious poetry  Renaissance literature  women 

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CFP: Transforming Bodies in Early Modern Drama (July 16th, 2018)

Posted By Christina M. Squitieri, Sunday, June 17, 2018
Updated: Monday, June 18, 2018
Transforming Bodies in Early Modern Drama
 

**This is a guaranteed session**

How are bodies–of people, plants, or animals–transformed on the early modern stage? What are the agents of transformation, and is there something about drama in particular that allows for bodily transformation? How is transformation represented (or not represented) dramatically? What constitutes a "body" on stage, and is a body still the same if parts of it transform? What does the transformation of the body tell us about corporeal unity, identity, transformation, or the instability of the body or identity? How can bodily transformation intersect with theoretic frameworks such as materialism, historicism, ecocriticism, animal studies, or the post-human?
 
Topics may include (but are not limited to) the way violence (physical, sexual, verbal), ritual, disguise, death, love, the natural world, disease, wounds, language, power, fear, etc have a transforming effect on the early modern human and non-human bodies that populate early modern drama, through any theoretical lens.
 
Please send 150-word abstracts and brief CV to Christina M. Squitieri (cms531@nyu.edu) and Penelope Meyers Usher (pfm250@nyu.edu) by Monday, July 16th, 2018. This panel will be sponsored by the Early Modern and Renaissance Society at New York University.

 

Tags:  animal  bodies  body  drama  early modern  ecocriticism  english  human  identity  nature  shakespeare  theater  transformation  violence 

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National Histories and Historical Nationalisms

Posted By Kelsey Ihinger, Wednesday, June 13, 2018

National Histories and Historical Nationalisms

 

In 1611, Spanish historian Luis Cabrera de Córdoba wrote the following about the author of histories: “escribe mejor el que no es natural de la provincia de quién hace historia” (“he who writes best is the man who is not native to the province whose history he tells”). To support this claim, Cabrera de Córdoba points to the famous Polydore Vergil, an Italian employed in writing the history of English kings. If the chronicle is meant to both portray historical events and celebrate a nation’s monarchy, can a foreign author more effectively achieve balance between truth and praise than a native historian? How does the depiction of history in other genres play with these same limits and what freedom exists within them to create or question the depiction of national history? The relationship between the historical genre and the creation of a coherent, regional, national, or imperial identity is the subject that this panel hopes to explore. Both history and nation are subjects that we will consider in their broadest and most multivalent senses. Historical subjects were treated in texts in many genres—from history plays, to chronicles, to broadside ballads—and nations both existed within smaller regions of a single monarchy’s territory and also stretched to the limits of its vast empire. By contemplating the connection that exists between various historical genres and concepts of nation and empire, this panel seeks to explore questions of how a cohesive identity was conceived of, created, fomented, or even dismantled in the early modern period. With attention paid to the context in which historical texts from various genres emerge, it is the hope of this panel that scholars from diverse disciplines and geographical areas of study will come together to discuss the questions posed by our theme.

 

Please send a 150-word abstract and a 300-word CV to Kelsey Ihinger (ihinger@wisc.edu). Proposals must be received by Friday, July 13. This panel will be sponsored by the Center for Early Modern Studies of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. 

Tags:  broadside  chronicle  empire  history play  identity  nation  social history 

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