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Interdisciplinary and Miscellaneous CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
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This blog is for CfPs for interdisciplinary sessions for RSA 2019 Toronto, as well as those that do not fit into the Art History, History, or Literature discipline categories. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Top tags: literature  art history  interdisciplinary  early modern  material culture  social history  art  book history  cultural history  gender  history  architecture  print culture  religion  circulation  classical reception  global  History of Science  identity  patronage  political history  transcultural  courts  digital humanities  gender studies  history of reading  Humanism  Philosophy  urban spaces  visual arts 

Secrecy, Catholicism, and Spycraft in Early Modern England

Posted By Kristin M. Bezio, Friday, July 27, 2018

The Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association is sponsoring a panel on Secrecy, Catholicism, and Spycraft in Early Modern England. We are seeking proposals which address the suppression, persecution, and preservation of Catholicism and Catholic praxis in early modern England following the Henrician Reformation up to 1660. We are interested in cross-disciplinary perspectives, including art and architectural history; literary depictions and works; social and cultural history; Recusant and Jesuit history; and other approaches.

Please send abstracts (150 words or less) and CVs (including expected date of completion for dissertation, if not already completed) to kbezio@richmond.edu by August 10th.

Tags:  Catholicism  cultural history  early modern  England  Literature  reformation  religion  social history  spies 

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Representations and Reality of The Early Modern English Marketplace

Posted By Kristin M. Bezio, Friday, July 27, 2018

The Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association is sponsoring a panel on Representations and Reality of The Early Modern English Marketplace. We are seeking paper proposals from any/all disciplines which discuss depictions, realities, and/or materialities of markets and marketplaces, including literary, artistic, musical, or historical contexts.

Please send abstracts (150 words or less) and CVs (including expected date of completion for dissertation, if not already completed) to kbezio@richmond.edu by August 10th.

Tags:  Art History  cultural history  Literature  markets  material culture  social history 

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Women’s Power and Mobility in the Renaissance

Posted By Kristin M. Bezio, Friday, July 27, 2018

The Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association is sponsoring a panel on Women’s Power and Mobility in the Renaissance. We are seeking paper proposals from any/all disciplines which address questions of women's mobility and power through art, music, or literature; in the social or political spheres; or within religious praxis or communities.

Please send abstracts (150 words or less) and CVs (including expected date of completion for dissertation, if not already completed) to kbezio@richmond.edu by August 10th.

Tags:  Literature  political history  religion  social history 

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Wonder Women: Amazons in the Early Modern European Imagination

Posted By Victoria G. Fanti, Thursday, July 26, 2018
Updated: Thursday, July 26, 2018

Session chair: Gerry Milligan, CUNY

The blockbuster success of the 2017 film Wonder Woman reignited a global interest in the figure of the Amazon, eliciting celebrations of female strength and independence alongside debates about her exoticism and sexualization. A sequel, already highly anticipated by many, is slated for release in late 2019.

Such a widespread interest in the Amazonian warrior-woman—both her allure and her paradox—is not, however, a new phenomenon; the Amazons likewise captured the popular and elite imagination of the Early Modern period, featuring in literary productions across Europe. Building on scholarship by Frédérique Verrier, Kathryn Schwarz, Sarah Colvin and Helen Watanabe-O’Kelly, Eleonora Stoppino, and Gerry Milligan (among many others), this panel seeks to put Early Modern representations of Amazons into dialogue with one another, across linguistic traditions and national borders, in order to explore the nuances of how these women were imagined, discussed, and disseminated across Europe.

We welcome papers that explore questions of sexuality, female violence, gender-bending, orientalism, politics, and the like. Texts and themes of interest might include, but are not limited to:        

-       Histories (and “histories”) of the Amazons

-       Literary and poetic imaginations of Amazonian women and/or their descendants, such as in the epic-chivalric tradition or in theater and/or opera

-       Treatises, dialogues, or correspondences that make reference to Amazons in order to engage with the querelle des femmes

-       The Early Modern use of Amazonian lore or symbolism for encomiastic purposes

 

Please send questions and/or abstracts (150 words) with a brief biography, A/V requests, and keywords to Victoria Fanti at vfanti1@jhu.edu by August 3

Tags:  French literature  gender  gender studies  German literature  Iberian Peninsula  interdisciplinary  Italian literature  Literature  Spain  women 

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CFP: Medicine, books, & herbs: pharmacology in Renaissance Europe

Posted By Caroline Petit, Thursday, July 26, 2018

Call For Papers

Renaissance Society of America

Annual Conference, March 17-19, 2019, Toronto, Canada

 

Medicine, books, & herbs: pharmacology in Renaissance Europe

 

This panel invites papers dedicated to pharmacological works and their readership in Renaissance Europe. Following the rediscovery of ancient medical works on drugs (notably Dioscorides’ and Galen’s) and the rise of new Latin translations, pharmacology as a field began to take shape in early modern Europe. The conflation of old texts and ancient authorities with new discoveries on the ground, in the Mediterranean, in the New World and in the East, resulted in a complex pattern of enduring old frameworks and new material. This panel aims at promoting detailed analyses of texts, with the hope to shed light on little-known authors and works. It also aims at examining potential interactions between new and ancient knowledge, and the dynamics of “reception” in the wake of an expanded, problematic world.

 

 

Interested participants are encouraged to consider the following themes:

 

*the role of herbs, drugs and antidotes (and especially theriac) in Renaissance texts (medical and not)

*the reception of ancient and medieval works on pharmacology (especially Galen)

*the diffusion of pharmacological knowledge throughout Renaissance Europe through books and other forms of communication

*methodological and theoretical discussion in pharmacology

*the role of currently under-researched medical authors (such as Prospero Alpini) in the development of pharmacology

*the role of translators and travellers in enriching the materia medica

*the importance of colonial approaches in the formation of early modern pharmacology

*national/nativist traditions in pharmacology

 

 

This panel is sponsored by the Medicine & Science discipline representative.

 

Please submit short abstract (150 words max.) and brief CV (one page max.) by August 8, 2018 to Caroline Petit at the following address : agostino@carolinepetit.net

Tags:  book history  classical reception  history of medicine  Humanism  microhistory  print culture  Renaissance 

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Violence and Trauma in the Early Modern World

Posted By Colin S. Rose, Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Call for Papers for RSA 2019: Violence and Trauma in the Early Modern World

 

Recent historiography has stressed the centrality of violence to early modern history. Interpersonal violence, state violence and military violence have all come under scrutiny for the ways that violence shaped lived experiences and disrupted civil society. This panel seeks to expand on this growing school of thought by asking: how did the trauma wrought by violence and crisis change people’s perspectives on the world around them? Were people inured to its impact, were they fascinated by the danger in their streets, were they deeply troubled by the instability of the world around them? This is an interdisciplinary call for proposals for papers for RSA 2019 Toronto dealing with any aspect of violence and trauma in the early modern world. Papers may address history, literature, art, philosophy or any combination of disciplines present at the RSA in order to build a productive interdisciplinary conversation.

 

Please send:

  • paper title (15-word maximum)
  • abstract (150-word maximum)
  • curriculum vitae (.pdf or .doc upload)
  • PhD completion date (past or expected)
  • full name, current affiliation, and email address

 

to Colin Rose (crose@brocku.ca) by AUGUST 5th 2018

Tags:  interdisciplinary  trauma  violence 

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Landscapes of Alterity, c. 1500-1700 [extended deadline: August 6, 2018]

Posted By Francesco Freddolini, Wednesday, July 25, 2018
Updated: Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Organizers: Erin E. Benay and Francesco Freddolini

 

Early modern prints, frontispieces, book illustrations, and paintings often imagined Asia, Africa, or the New World in terms of its ecosystem. These images, designed with European readers/viewers in mind, provided early modern audiences with glimpses of distant geographies and landscapes, real or imagined. For instance, Jacopo Stradano’s landscapes in his Nova Reperta series, although figments of the artist’s imagination, play a crucial role in defining lands that are waiting for European appropriation. Similarly, the landscapes in Albert Eckhout’s or Frans Post’s paintings contribute as much to the complexity of otherness and discourses of colonization as do the figures in these pictures.  The people, flora, and fauna illustrated in Athanasius Kircher’s China Monumentis exist in landscapes that fully participate in the construction of such images’ meanings.  

The authors of sixteenth and seventeenth-century textual accounts of foreign lands similarly attempted to characterize the most marvelous topographic features of distant lands. However, scholarship on these images and texts has often focused on the proto-ethnographic way in which these sources could convey ‘information’ (however inaccurate) about the landscapes from which the products derived.  Alternately, scholars have considered the collection of foreign, ‘exotic,’ natural specimens (bulbs, plant samples), animals (living or represented), and other natural ‘wonders’ as components in microcosmic studioli or Wunderkammern, or have privileged the images that isolate specimens of flora and fauna from their ecosystem.

Rather than see flora and fauna as curiosities, devoid of spatial context, however, we hope to explore instead the ways in which early modern artists imagined, represented, manipulated, and invented non-European landscapes. Landscape, as a genre, had a long-standing and codified tradition in early modern Europe. By interrogating the ways in which this tradition accommodated or contributed to narratives of colonization and empire-building, we hope that we might better understand the agency of landscape as a genre and as a forum for the construction of ‘foreignness.’  We seek papers that focus on the spatial, cultural, and natural context of landscapes as sites for the production of knowledge and for the evolving discourse of ‘otherness’ in early modern Europe.  Papers in this session might address the following questions:

·         How does the genre of landscape incorporate observation, specificity (real or illusory), and notions of scientific accuracy to evoke the ‘exotic?’

·         In what ways did artists force the limits of the genre, or manipulate the veracity of the landscape in order to comply with the conventions of the genre, while representing non-European landscapes? 

·         In what ways did artists (such as Frans Post or Albert Eckhout) work to shape European conceptions about foreign places?

·         How did the diverse, and often competing agendas of various European countries shape the way in which foreign lands were represented, for example as welcoming, hostile, civilized, built, or savage?

·         How did foreign landscapes, often manipulated to comply with the conventions of the European genre, accommodate local architecture? How are the tensions between colonial architecture and foreign ecosystems articulated by artists?

 

Please submit proposals to Erin Benay (eeb50@case.edu) and Francesco Freddolini (francesco.freddolini@uregina.ca) by August 6, 2018. Proposals should include a paper title (15-word maximum); and abstract (150-word maximum); keywords; and a brief academic CV (300-word maximum). Submission guidelines available at https://www.rsa.org/page/2019SubmissionsGuide .

Tags:  alterity  art history  colonialism  early modern global exchanges  exoticism  landscape  print culture 

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Illustrated Album Amicorum

Posted By Margaret F. Rosenthal, Tuesday, July 24, 2018

 

CALL for PAPERS: This panel is proposed for the annual Renaissance Conference of Southern California (March 10, 2019) at the Huntington Library.

Illustrated Alba Amicorum

The illustrated album amicorum (album of friends) is a singular visual example of early-modern travelers’ fascination with swiftly-changing fashions, regional customs, family lineage, and manuscript decoration. It preserves depictions of dress, local scenes of work and entertainment, modes of transportation, festivals, games, and civic rituals, and reveals major changes in fashionable and luxurious clothing and accessories. Uniting the printed book and the illustrated manuscript to transmit knowledge and thinking across early-modern Europe, it was often a luxury object in and of itself, thereby materializing within its pages an expanding world economy. Other important uses of the album amicorum were as modes of philosophical thought;  testaments to friendship; a locus where university students could freely use and manipulate the visual to reflect on serious philosophical questions outside of the classroom setting; and a vehicle for provoking laughter and pleasure. A fluid genre allowing for the coexistence of different visual genres (prints, emblems, frontispieces, fashion and costume plates) within its pages, this panel invites papers that will broaden our understanding further about its multiple uses during the early-modern period.

As per RSA guidelines, paper proposals should include the following: paper title (15-word maximum), abstract (150-word maximum), a few keywords, and a very brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum). Please send to session organizer Margaret (Tita) Rosenthal (mrosenth@usc.edu) by August 6, 2018.  

Tags:  expanding world economy economy  illustarted albums  manuscript illustrations; book illustration; fashi  philosophical thought 

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RSA panel on ‘Oriental Studies in Europe, 1500–1700’

Posted By Nil Palabiyik, Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Papers are sought for a panel on ‘Oriental Studies in Europe, 1500–1700’ to be submitted to the RSA 2019 (Toronto, 17–21 March).

 

Western Europe saw an unprecedented level of scholarly activity in Arabic, Persian and Turkish in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth century. The engagement with languages of the East came in many different forms including Latin translations and refutations of the Qurʾān; the study of biblical texts in the languages of the Middle East; the study of scientific, literary and philosophical texts; and the printing of the first dictionaries, grammars and phrasebooks of these three languages.

 

The panel will discuss the historical development of Oriental Studies in early modern Europe through manuscript collections and early printed editions of Arabic, Persian and Turkish texts, such as the printed output of the Medici Press in Rome or Thomas Erpenius’s publishing house in Leiden, as well as marginalia and annotations on manuscripts and printed books. 

 

 

The topics are not limited to but may include:

 

– institutionalisation of the teaching of Oriental languages and the founding of chairs for Arabic at universities such as Bologna, Paris and Oxford

– early printed editions in Turkish, Persian and Arabic

– technical issues arising from printing with Arabic type; the availability and sourcing of materials for printing Arabic; the centres for printing with Arabic type; the printers, correctors and typesetters of Arabic type; printing Arabic-, Persian- and Turkish-language books with non-Arabic type

– early Oriental dictionaries, grammars, phrasebooks and their authors

– bible translations into Arabic, Persian and Turkish

– Qurʾānic studies in early modern Europe

– Oriental manuscripts in royal, public, ecclesiastical, university and private early modern libraries; scholarly collections of Oriental books

 

If you would like to join us, please send an e-mail to me, Nil Palabiyik (nil.palabiyik@lmu.de), immediately to register your interest.

I will need:

– a paper title (15-word maximum)

– an abstract (150-word maximum)

– a short CV

– your full name, current affiliation, and email address

 

by 5 August at the latest.

Tags:  Arabic  book history  cultural history  early modern  Hebrew  history  History of Science  Humanism  interdisciplinary  Oriental studies  Orientalism  Ottoman  Persian  Turkish 

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Printing, Reception, Editing, and Teaching Thomas More and Early Humanists

Posted By Emily A. Ransom, Tuesday, July 24, 2018
The Amici Thomae Mori is excited to welcome proposals for papers on Thomas More studies to coincide with the publication of the new Essential Works of Thomas More (Yale University Press, 2019).  This single-volume, accessible, readable edition will be the third major collection of More’s works in nearly five hundred years, after the 1557 Workes published by More’s nephew William Rastell and the Yale Complete Works in fifteen volumes completed in 1997. Though papers on all areas of Thomas More studies will be considered, the Amici is especially interested in topics that will complement this important publication, such as print history of humanist texts, reception history of Thomas More and early humanists, editing humanist texts, and teaching humanist texts in the modern classroom.

To submit a paper, please send your title (15-word max), abstract (150-word max), a few keywords, CV, PhD completion date (past or expected), and affiliation to Emily Ransom (ransome@uwgb.edu) by August 10, 2018.  

Tags:  archives  book history  catholic reform  circulation  classical reception  cultural history  devotion  history  history of reading  history of the book  Humanism  interdisciplinary  literature  pedagogy  philosophy  political history  print culture  publishers  religion  transmission 

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