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Interdisciplinary and Miscellaneous CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
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This blog is for CfPs for interdisciplinary sessions for RSA 2019 Toronto, as well as those that do not fit into the Art History, History, or Literature discipline categories. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Representations and Reality of The Early Modern English Marketplace

Posted By Kristin M. Bezio, Friday, July 27, 2018

The Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association is sponsoring a panel on Representations and Reality of The Early Modern English Marketplace. We are seeking paper proposals from any/all disciplines which discuss depictions, realities, and/or materialities of markets and marketplaces, including literary, artistic, musical, or historical contexts.

Please send abstracts (150 words or less) and CVs (including expected date of completion for dissertation, if not already completed) to kbezio@richmond.edu by August 10th.

Tags:  Art History  cultural history  Literature  markets  material culture  social history 

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Landscapes of Alterity, c. 1500-1700 [extended deadline: August 6, 2018]

Posted By Francesco Freddolini, Wednesday, July 25, 2018
Updated: Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Organizers: Erin E. Benay and Francesco Freddolini

 

Early modern prints, frontispieces, book illustrations, and paintings often imagined Asia, Africa, or the New World in terms of its ecosystem. These images, designed with European readers/viewers in mind, provided early modern audiences with glimpses of distant geographies and landscapes, real or imagined. For instance, Jacopo Stradano’s landscapes in his Nova Reperta series, although figments of the artist’s imagination, play a crucial role in defining lands that are waiting for European appropriation. Similarly, the landscapes in Albert Eckhout’s or Frans Post’s paintings contribute as much to the complexity of otherness and discourses of colonization as do the figures in these pictures.  The people, flora, and fauna illustrated in Athanasius Kircher’s China Monumentis exist in landscapes that fully participate in the construction of such images’ meanings.  

The authors of sixteenth and seventeenth-century textual accounts of foreign lands similarly attempted to characterize the most marvelous topographic features of distant lands. However, scholarship on these images and texts has often focused on the proto-ethnographic way in which these sources could convey ‘information’ (however inaccurate) about the landscapes from which the products derived.  Alternately, scholars have considered the collection of foreign, ‘exotic,’ natural specimens (bulbs, plant samples), animals (living or represented), and other natural ‘wonders’ as components in microcosmic studioli or Wunderkammern, or have privileged the images that isolate specimens of flora and fauna from their ecosystem.

Rather than see flora and fauna as curiosities, devoid of spatial context, however, we hope to explore instead the ways in which early modern artists imagined, represented, manipulated, and invented non-European landscapes. Landscape, as a genre, had a long-standing and codified tradition in early modern Europe. By interrogating the ways in which this tradition accommodated or contributed to narratives of colonization and empire-building, we hope that we might better understand the agency of landscape as a genre and as a forum for the construction of ‘foreignness.’  We seek papers that focus on the spatial, cultural, and natural context of landscapes as sites for the production of knowledge and for the evolving discourse of ‘otherness’ in early modern Europe.  Papers in this session might address the following questions:

·         How does the genre of landscape incorporate observation, specificity (real or illusory), and notions of scientific accuracy to evoke the ‘exotic?’

·         In what ways did artists force the limits of the genre, or manipulate the veracity of the landscape in order to comply with the conventions of the genre, while representing non-European landscapes? 

·         In what ways did artists (such as Frans Post or Albert Eckhout) work to shape European conceptions about foreign places?

·         How did the diverse, and often competing agendas of various European countries shape the way in which foreign lands were represented, for example as welcoming, hostile, civilized, built, or savage?

·         How did foreign landscapes, often manipulated to comply with the conventions of the European genre, accommodate local architecture? How are the tensions between colonial architecture and foreign ecosystems articulated by artists?

 

Please submit proposals to Erin Benay (eeb50@case.edu) and Francesco Freddolini (francesco.freddolini@uregina.ca) by August 6, 2018. Proposals should include a paper title (15-word maximum); and abstract (150-word maximum); keywords; and a brief academic CV (300-word maximum). Submission guidelines available at https://www.rsa.org/page/2019SubmissionsGuide .

Tags:  alterity  art history  colonialism  early modern global exchanges  exoticism  landscape  print culture 

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Reappraisals of Renaissance Perspective

Posted By Tawrin Baker, Thursday, July 19, 2018

Fifty years ago, the status of linear perspective was clear: It was a technical achievement that signaled the rationality of sight and paved the way for the scientific revolution. In the succeeding years, scholars have argued for the incoherence of both the perspective (Elkins) and scientific revolution (Shapin) concepts. It is now not so clear how to link the rendering of space in a painting to larger intellectual developments in the sciences, culture or society. At best perspective represents a separate practice. At worse it is merely a fetish of European exceptionalism. 

 

As the postmodern critique of science has weakened and some embrace of it seems politically necessary (e.g. the climate change debate), how would this affect our understanding of linear perspective? This panel seeks to address this question by asking: 

  • What were the varieties of Renaissance perspective, and more broadly what was the larger economy of geometrical knowing?
  • How are applying divisions of theory and practice, or strictly geometric versus logistical concerns, relevant to discerning progressive knowledge? 
  • Does the clarification of artistic intentions help understand the perspectivist’s knowledge (e.g. for Piero della Francesca) 
  • Who actually had the abilities to apply rigorous perspective versus the everyday shortcut uses? 
  • What is at stake, for us right now, in the study of Renaissance perspective?

The panel especially seeks to move beyond entrenched positions - a reactionary scientistic view of perspective or a critical, deflationary view. We are interested in cases where linkages emerge but which demand a new understanding or contextualization of knowledge in the early modern period. 

 

By August 1st, please send an abstract of no more than 150 words, with keywords, and a brief cv to Tawrin Baker (tawrin@sas.upenn.edu) and Ian Verstegen (verstege@sas.upenn.edu). 

Tags:  Art History  early modern  Geometry  History of Science  Humanism  interdisciplinary  Perspective 

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In Search of the Canon: Poets and Artists Confronting with their Models (c. 1500-1700)

Posted By Maria G. Matarazzo, Thursday, July 19, 2018

The theory of Imitation was a central topic of discussion in the ‘Republic of Letters’. The European community of humanists, philosophers, poets and artists was engaged in the dispute over the models to refer to during the creative process. How to develop a normative canon as a reference point for artists and writers in the practice of Imitation? Which poets and artists to select as the examples of ‘bello stile’?

While the authority of ancient models was universally acknowledged, the building of a canon of modern masters was under discussion. One of the typical environments of this discussion were the Academies, where writers, artists, philosophers, antiquarians gathered around learned patrons.

Considering the interdisciplinary nature of this debate, this panel aims to explore the construction of a canon through a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective. The main purpose is not only to study the mechanisms implied in the building of the canon but also to bring out the intersections between Art and Literature concerning this topic.

Questions to be considered include but are not limited to: the institutions where the debate took place, with a particular focus on the Academies; rhetorical devices for debating the canon and the metaphors of Imitation; the circulation of the canon through publishing, printings, new editions and reproductive printmaking; the impact of the canon on the teaching practices.

 

Please submit proposals to Ida Duretto (ida.duretto@sns.it) and Maria Gabriella Matarazzo (mariagabriella.matarazzo@sns.it) by August 12, 2018.

Proposals should include a paper title, an abstract (150-word maximum), keywords and a CV (300-word maximum).

Tags:  academies  Art History  book history  cultural history  early modern  history of reading  history of the book  Imitation  interdisciplinary  literature  mimesis  patronage  philology  Poetry  print culture  publishers  reproductive prints  the canon  visual arts 

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Defining Space: Walls and Cities in the Early Modern World

Posted By Luis J. Gordo Pelaez, Thursday, July 19, 2018

Walls have been an omnipresent feature of human settlements since ancient times. Even today they continue to be apart of our daily life and discourse, whether for politically driven purposes (i.e. US border “security”) or satyr (i.e. the now defunk website, Bricking it for Canada). Whether ancient or contemporary, walls have contributed to defining and redefining spaces, creating a sense of place and identity, demarcating physical boundaries, and imposing socio-economic hierarchies of inclusion and exclusion. In the context of early modern cities, walls experienced a resurgence as a consequence, among others, of expanding empires and colonizing efforts, the development of warfare technology and new systems of fortification, and the implementation of directives regarding the distribution and use of urban space. Whether materialized or not (Richard Kagan has examined their absence in inland colonial Spanish America), walls were a common occurrence in the schemes of early modern urban theorists and planners, and a frequent instrument of discussion in the political and socio-economic plans of absolute regimes, particularly in foreign dominions. For better or worse, walls have maintained their relevance. Framed by contemporary understandings of walls, this session aims to examine the relationship between cities and walls during the early modern era from a global comparative perspective. Papers that interrogate this interplay in any of its manifestations (conceptualization and building, notions of agency and perception associated with these infrastructures, the dichotomy inside/outside, narrative and graphic representation, and materiality) during the period 1300-1700 are particularly welcome to this comparative panel. 

 

Please send paper titles (15-word max.); abstracts (150-word max.); brief CVs; PhD competition date (past or expected); full name, current affiliation, and e-mail address to organizers (Cody Barteet, cbarteet@uwo.ca; and Luis Gordo-Peláez, luisgordopelaez@csufresno.edu) by August 8, 2018. Submission guidelines are available at https://www.rsa.org/page/2019SubmissionsGuide .

Tags:  architecture  art  art history  city  cultural history  early modern  history  identity  literature  material culture  representation  seventeenth century  sixteenth century  social history  urban spaces  urban studies  urbanism  walls 

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Renaissance Vegetarianism - Deadline Extended

Posted By Andrea Crow, Monday, July 16, 2018

The study of early modern food has blossomed in recent years. As scholars have parsed the politics of changing dining practices, the role of recipes in intellectual history, and the growing perception of food ethics as inextricable from social identity, dietary beliefs and habits have begun to be seen as central to early modern studies. One of the most striking dietary trends that spread across Europe in this period, however, remains underexamined: the rise of vegetarianism.


This panel invites papers from across disciplines that examine Renaissance vegetarianism in order to think through the intertwining religious, economic, political, and ethical motives that spurred this transnational movement forward. Possible topics might include views on vegetarianism in the early modern dietary sciences, radical vegetarian leaders and the communities that they organized, vegetarian cuisine and recipe books, the revival of Classical vegetarian thought, or the representation of vegetarianism in literature and the arts.


Proposals should include the presenter’s name, academic affiliation, email address, paper title (15 words maximum), abstract (150 words maximum), and CV (300 words maximum). Please submit proposals by August 1st to Andrea Crow (andrea.crow@bc.edu).

Tags:  art history  ethics  food studies  interdisciplinary  literature  political history  recipe books  vegetarianism 

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Health in Medicine and Visual Arts, 1300-1550

Posted By Jordan J. Famularo, Friday, July 13, 2018

CFP: Health in Medicine and Visual Arts, 1300-1550

Artists and architects contributed to cultures of health in medieval and early modern societies, yet their ties to medical practice are often overlooked in modern scholarship. This session invites historians across disciplines to compare their approaches to visual cultures of medicine between 1300 and 1550. Which perspectives and methods might be productively shared among historians of medicine, science, art, architecture, and other specialties focused on care for the body, mind, and soul? A key objective is to advance research on interactions between learned medicine (i.e., taught in universities) and visual arts.

Papers are invited to address the body of knowledge by which artifacts and monuments were believed to be therapeutic and/or protective. How and why were such effects ascribed to images, objects, and spaces?

Topics might include

- images in medical astrology: instructions for their making and use

- restorative spaces in domestic and institutional buildings

- therapeutic works on paper: books, almanacs, calendars, prints

- apothecaries and foreign ingredients in the service of medicine and pigment-making

- objects and environments used in regimens for preserving health and hygiene

Intercultural, interregional, and transoceanic topics are welcome.

Paper proposals are due by August 5, 2018 to Jordan Famularo, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University (jjf376@nyu.edu). Proposals should include two documents: an abstract with paper title (250 words maximum) and CV. Please indicate the presenter’s title and affiliation.

Submissions are considered commitments to attend the conference and to be responsible for registration and membership fees.

Tags:  architecture  art history  early modern  History of Medicine  History of Science  interdisciplinary  medieval  visual culture 

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Rethinking Renaissance and Early Modern Musical Instruments

Posted By Emanuela Vai, Thursday, July 5, 2018
Updated: Thursday, July 5, 2018

Rethinking Renaissance and Early Modern Musical Instruments

Music has long been theorised as intangible culture separate from the materiality of musical instruments. Moving beyond approaches that position musical instruments merely as containers for sound, this panel aims to rethink and reassess their material, visual, affective and social dimensions. Recent interdisciplinary ‘turns’ towards new materialisms, posthumanisms, sensorialities and object-orientated ontologies are opening up alternative theoretical and methodological pathways and perspectives for engaging with the material culture of music. Building on this growing interest in the agency and vitality of matter, and the social lives and affective dynamics of objects, this panel invites papers that engage with the non-auditory or para-sonic aspects of Renaissance and Early Modern musical instruments. Entangled in cultural flows and commodity chains, instruments moved through Renaissance worlds, articulating meaning, establishing relations and signifying social status as they did so. Musical instruments materially index an array of cultural, political and aesthetic values and were designed not only to be played and heard but to be seen, sold and dis-played. Bringing together scholars from across the disciplines, this panel aims to promote discussion of musical instruments by exploring the ways in which they were valued and made to have meaning, their materiality and aesthetics, and the range of relationships formed between musical instruments and musicians, craftspeople, collectors and sellers.

 

Topics could address but are by no means limited to:

 

-       The social lives of musical instruments

-       Musical instruments and the museological gaze

-       Ornamentation, iconography, and aesthetics

-       The challenges and opportunities of object-orientated and materialist approaches

-       Silenced, collected and dis-played musical instruments

-       Practices of instrument production and consumption

-       Musical instruments and gender/social/class status

-       Object histories

-     Instruments as models and metaphors in Renaissance scientific epistemologies,  cosmologies and ontologies

-       Epistemological aspects of museum documentation and curatorial practices

-       Musical instruments as material culture

-       New technologies and historical research: digital imaging, modelling, making and interpretation of cultural heritage objects

 

This CFP invites paper proposals from scholars working in musicology, art history, organology, cultural history, material and visual culture studies and anthropology. As per RSA guidelines, please send proposals including presenter’s name and affiliation (if applicable), email, paper title (15-word maximum), abstract (150-word maximum), keywords, and a brief curriculum vitae to the organiser Emanuela Vai [ev321@cam.ac.ukby Friday, 27 July 2018.

Presenters will need to be members of the RSA by the time of the conference. Submission guidelines are available at https://www.rsa.org/page/2019SubmissionsGuideFeel free to email with any questions.

 Attached Files:

Tags:  anthropology  art history  cultural heritage  digital humanities  iconography  material culture  museum practices  musical instruments  musicology  organology  ornamentation and aesthetics  scientific epistemologies and ontologies  sensory studies  visual studies 

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More Than Merely Passive: Addressing the Early Modern Audience

Posted By John R. Decker, Monday, July 2, 2018
Updated: Monday, July 9, 2018

“… so that the learned may savor the profundity of the allegory while the humble may profit from the lightness of the story” (de modo praedicandi)

 

Early modern audiences were not homogenous. Differences in status, education, language, wealth, and experience (to name only a few) could influence how a group of people, or a particular person, received and made sense of sermons, public proclamations, images, objects, and spaces. The ways in which images, objects, proclamations, etc. were framed and executed could have a serious impact on their relevance and effectiveness. This session seeks papers that investigate the ways in which authors, artists, preachers, theologians, and civic or court officials took account of and encoded pluriform audiences in their works. Topics might consider, but are not limited to, questions such as: What sorts of strategies were employed to take into account multiple ‘levels’ of audience? How well did such strategies work? What were the consequences—possible or actual—when they failed? Please submit an abstract and CV by no later than 30 July, 2018 to: jdecker@pratt.edu.

Tags:  art history  artists  collaboration  cultural history  gender  identity  images  imagination  invention  literature  material culture  patronage  religious communities  representation  social history  urban spaces  urbanism  visual arts  visual communication  visual culture 

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Renaissance Vegetarianism

Posted By Andrea Crow, Tuesday, June 26, 2018

The study of early modern food has blossomed in recent years. As scholars have parsed the politics of changing dining practices, the role of recipes in intellectual history, and the growing perception of food ethics as inextricable from social identity, dietary beliefs and habits have begun to be seen as central to early modern studies. One of the most striking dietary trends that spread across Europe in this period, however, remains underexamined: the rise of vegetarianism.


This panel invites papers from across disciplines that examine Renaissance vegetarianism in order to think through the intertwining religious, economic, political, and ethical motives that spurred this transnational movement forward. Possible topics might include views on vegetarianism in the early modern dietary sciences, radical vegetarian leaders and the communities that they organized, vegetarian cuisine and recipe books, the revival of Classical vegetarian thought, or the representation of vegetarianism in literature and the arts.


Proposals should include the presenter’s name, academic affiliation, email address, paper title (15 words maximum), abstract (150 words maximum), and CV (300 words maximum). Please submit proposals by July 15th to Andrea Crow (amc2341@columbia.edu).


Tags:  art history  ethics  food studies  Literature  political history  recipe books  vegetarianism 

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