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Interdisciplinary and Miscellaneous CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
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This blog is for CfPs for interdisciplinary sessions for RSA 2019 Toronto, as well as those that do not fit into the Art History, History, or Literature discipline categories. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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RSA panel on ‘Oriental Studies in Europe, 1500–1700’

Posted By Nil Palabiyik, Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Papers are sought for a panel on ‘Oriental Studies in Europe, 1500–1700’ to be submitted to the RSA 2019 (Toronto, 17–21 March).

 

Western Europe saw an unprecedented level of scholarly activity in Arabic, Persian and Turkish in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth century. The engagement with languages of the East came in many different forms including Latin translations and refutations of the Qurʾān; the study of biblical texts in the languages of the Middle East; the study of scientific, literary and philosophical texts; and the printing of the first dictionaries, grammars and phrasebooks of these three languages.

 

The panel will discuss the historical development of Oriental Studies in early modern Europe through manuscript collections and early printed editions of Arabic, Persian and Turkish texts, such as the printed output of the Medici Press in Rome or Thomas Erpenius’s publishing house in Leiden, as well as marginalia and annotations on manuscripts and printed books. 

 

 

The topics are not limited to but may include:

 

– institutionalisation of the teaching of Oriental languages and the founding of chairs for Arabic at universities such as Bologna, Paris and Oxford

– early printed editions in Turkish, Persian and Arabic

– technical issues arising from printing with Arabic type; the availability and sourcing of materials for printing Arabic; the centres for printing with Arabic type; the printers, correctors and typesetters of Arabic type; printing Arabic-, Persian- and Turkish-language books with non-Arabic type

– early Oriental dictionaries, grammars, phrasebooks and their authors

– bible translations into Arabic, Persian and Turkish

– Qurʾānic studies in early modern Europe

– Oriental manuscripts in royal, public, ecclesiastical, university and private early modern libraries; scholarly collections of Oriental books

 

If you would like to join us, please send an e-mail to me, Nil Palabiyik (nil.palabiyik@lmu.de), immediately to register your interest.

I will need:

– a paper title (15-word maximum)

– an abstract (150-word maximum)

– a short CV

– your full name, current affiliation, and email address

 

by 5 August at the latest.

Tags:  Arabic  book history  cultural history  early modern  Hebrew  history  History of Science  Humanism  interdisciplinary  Oriental studies  Orientalism  Ottoman  Persian  Turkish 

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Reappraisals of Renaissance Perspective

Posted By Tawrin Baker, Thursday, July 19, 2018

Fifty years ago, the status of linear perspective was clear: It was a technical achievement that signaled the rationality of sight and paved the way for the scientific revolution. In the succeeding years, scholars have argued for the incoherence of both the perspective (Elkins) and scientific revolution (Shapin) concepts. It is now not so clear how to link the rendering of space in a painting to larger intellectual developments in the sciences, culture or society. At best perspective represents a separate practice. At worse it is merely a fetish of European exceptionalism. 

 

As the postmodern critique of science has weakened and some embrace of it seems politically necessary (e.g. the climate change debate), how would this affect our understanding of linear perspective? This panel seeks to address this question by asking: 

  • What were the varieties of Renaissance perspective, and more broadly what was the larger economy of geometrical knowing?
  • How are applying divisions of theory and practice, or strictly geometric versus logistical concerns, relevant to discerning progressive knowledge? 
  • Does the clarification of artistic intentions help understand the perspectivist’s knowledge (e.g. for Piero della Francesca) 
  • Who actually had the abilities to apply rigorous perspective versus the everyday shortcut uses? 
  • What is at stake, for us right now, in the study of Renaissance perspective?

The panel especially seeks to move beyond entrenched positions - a reactionary scientistic view of perspective or a critical, deflationary view. We are interested in cases where linkages emerge but which demand a new understanding or contextualization of knowledge in the early modern period. 

 

By August 1st, please send an abstract of no more than 150 words, with keywords, and a brief cv to Tawrin Baker (tawrin@sas.upenn.edu) and Ian Verstegen (verstege@sas.upenn.edu). 

Tags:  Art History  early modern  Geometry  History of Science  Humanism  interdisciplinary  Perspective 

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Health in Medicine and Visual Arts, 1300-1550

Posted By Jordan J. Famularo, Friday, July 13, 2018

CFP: Health in Medicine and Visual Arts, 1300-1550

Artists and architects contributed to cultures of health in medieval and early modern societies, yet their ties to medical practice are often overlooked in modern scholarship. This session invites historians across disciplines to compare their approaches to visual cultures of medicine between 1300 and 1550. Which perspectives and methods might be productively shared among historians of medicine, science, art, architecture, and other specialties focused on care for the body, mind, and soul? A key objective is to advance research on interactions between learned medicine (i.e., taught in universities) and visual arts.

Papers are invited to address the body of knowledge by which artifacts and monuments were believed to be therapeutic and/or protective. How and why were such effects ascribed to images, objects, and spaces?

Topics might include

- images in medical astrology: instructions for their making and use

- restorative spaces in domestic and institutional buildings

- therapeutic works on paper: books, almanacs, calendars, prints

- apothecaries and foreign ingredients in the service of medicine and pigment-making

- objects and environments used in regimens for preserving health and hygiene

Intercultural, interregional, and transoceanic topics are welcome.

Paper proposals are due by August 5, 2018 to Jordan Famularo, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University (jjf376@nyu.edu). Proposals should include two documents: an abstract with paper title (250 words maximum) and CV. Please indicate the presenter’s title and affiliation.

Submissions are considered commitments to attend the conference and to be responsible for registration and membership fees.

Tags:  architecture  art history  early modern  History of Medicine  History of Science  interdisciplinary  medieval  visual culture 

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Kircher’s World

Posted By Thomas Beachdel, Friday, June 15, 2018
Updated: Friday, June 15, 2018

Call For Papers

Renaissance Society of America

Annual Conference, March 17-19, 2019, Toronto, Canada

Kircher’s World

This panel invites papers on the work, influence, or problematization of the seventeenth-century polymath, Athanasius Kircher (1602-1680). A category defying figure caught between the encyclopaedism of the Renaissance and the turn toward specialized knowledge, Kircher has not received the attention of his more “scientific” contemporaries, such as Kepler or Newton, and is often regarded as an outside figure, given his penchant for the arcane, the mysterious, and his adherence to the Hermetic tradition, despite the work of Copernicus. At the same time, the vast outpouring of Kircher’s work on a broad range of subjects—Egyptian civilization and hieroglyphs (Oedipus Aegyptiacus), music (Musurgia Universalis), China (China Monumentis), geology (Mundus Subterraneus)—was extremely influential to a wide audience during his lifetime. Of particular interest are papers dealing with Kircher’s Mundus Subterraneus and the influence of this text and his viewpoint on geology, theories of the formation of the earth, and volcanism.

Session Chair: Thomas Beachdel, CUNY, Hostos

Please submit a short (max. 150 word) abstract and CV by July 31, 2018 to: thomas.beachdel@gmail.com

Tags:  art  art history  book history  circulation  cultural history  early modern  History of Science  interdisciplinary  print culture  transcultural  visual arts  visual culturecirculation 

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Margaret Cavendish Society Sponsored Sessions CFP

Posted By Lara A. Dodds, Wednesday, May 16, 2018

The Margaret Cavendish Society will sponsor one or more panel sessions at the Renaissance Society of America annual Meeting in Toronto (March 17-19, 2019). We invite proposals for presentations on any topic related to the works of Margaret Cavendish.  Please submit abstracts (150 words maximum) and a brief CV (300 words maximum) to Lara Dodds (ldodds@english.msstate.edu) and James Fitzmaurice (j.fitzmaurice@sheffield.ac.uk)

 by August 1, 2018.

Tags:  Cavendish  gender  gender studies  history  History of Science  Literature  women 

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Fiat Lux: Art, Religion, and Science in Early Modern Italy

Posted By Steven J. Cody, Thursday, May 3, 2018

Light is essential to the visual arts and, indeed, to vision itself. Over seventy years ago, Millard Meiss drew our attention to the ethereal, often overlooked representation of light in some fifteenth-century paintings, eventually arguing that it “could become a major pictorial theme.” As we now know, Renaissance artists engaged with notions of divinity, sacred wisdom, and visual experience—all through the effects of light. But how does one talk, in any serious manner, about something that is fundamentally intangible? The ethereal nature of light presents a challenge for the artist who attempts to depict it, the beholder who attempts to appreciate it, and the art historian who attempts to study it.

 

These panels serve as a forum for scholars who explore light’s formal, symbolic, metaphoric, and scientific dimensions. We seek participants who take innovative approaches to pictorial light and to theories of sight. Presenters are welcome to consider works of art produced in any of Italy’s locales and at any point in the early modern period, so long as the works are religious in nature. Papers that adopt an interdisciplinary focus are especially encouraged. It is our hope that, through these conversations, we will be able to reconstruct the rich context in which art, religion, and science found a common language in light.


Proposal Instructions:

Please send proposals and direct any queries to both Eric Hupe (erh4vv@virginia.edu) and Steven Cody (codys@pfw.edu). Proposals must be submitted by 1 August and include the following items:

- The presenter’s name, affiliation, and email address
- The paper’s title
- An abstract (150-word maximum)
- Keywords
- A brief CV

- PhD completion date (past or expected)

Tags:  art  History of Science  Italy  light  religion 

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