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Interdisciplinary and Miscellaneous CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
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This blog is for CfPs for interdisciplinary sessions for RSA 2019 Toronto, as well as those that do not fit into the Art History, History, or Literature discipline categories. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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CFP: Medicine, books, & herbs: pharmacology in Renaissance Europe

Posted By Caroline Petit, Thursday, July 26, 2018

Call For Papers

Renaissance Society of America

Annual Conference, March 17-19, 2019, Toronto, Canada

 

Medicine, books, & herbs: pharmacology in Renaissance Europe

 

This panel invites papers dedicated to pharmacological works and their readership in Renaissance Europe. Following the rediscovery of ancient medical works on drugs (notably Dioscorides’ and Galen’s) and the rise of new Latin translations, pharmacology as a field began to take shape in early modern Europe. The conflation of old texts and ancient authorities with new discoveries on the ground, in the Mediterranean, in the New World and in the East, resulted in a complex pattern of enduring old frameworks and new material. This panel aims at promoting detailed analyses of texts, with the hope to shed light on little-known authors and works. It also aims at examining potential interactions between new and ancient knowledge, and the dynamics of “reception” in the wake of an expanded, problematic world.

 

 

Interested participants are encouraged to consider the following themes:

 

*the role of herbs, drugs and antidotes (and especially theriac) in Renaissance texts (medical and not)

*the reception of ancient and medieval works on pharmacology (especially Galen)

*the diffusion of pharmacological knowledge throughout Renaissance Europe through books and other forms of communication

*methodological and theoretical discussion in pharmacology

*the role of currently under-researched medical authors (such as Prospero Alpini) in the development of pharmacology

*the role of translators and travellers in enriching the materia medica

*the importance of colonial approaches in the formation of early modern pharmacology

*national/nativist traditions in pharmacology

 

 

This panel is sponsored by the Medicine & Science discipline representative.

 

Please submit short abstract (150 words max.) and brief CV (one page max.) by August 8, 2018 to Caroline Petit at the following address : agostino@carolinepetit.net

Tags:  book history  classical reception  history of medicine  Humanism  microhistory  print culture  Renaissance 

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RSA panel on ‘Oriental Studies in Europe, 1500–1700’

Posted By Nil Palabiyik, Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Papers are sought for a panel on ‘Oriental Studies in Europe, 1500–1700’ to be submitted to the RSA 2019 (Toronto, 17–21 March).

 

Western Europe saw an unprecedented level of scholarly activity in Arabic, Persian and Turkish in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth century. The engagement with languages of the East came in many different forms including Latin translations and refutations of the Qurʾān; the study of biblical texts in the languages of the Middle East; the study of scientific, literary and philosophical texts; and the printing of the first dictionaries, grammars and phrasebooks of these three languages.

 

The panel will discuss the historical development of Oriental Studies in early modern Europe through manuscript collections and early printed editions of Arabic, Persian and Turkish texts, such as the printed output of the Medici Press in Rome or Thomas Erpenius’s publishing house in Leiden, as well as marginalia and annotations on manuscripts and printed books. 

 

 

The topics are not limited to but may include:

 

– institutionalisation of the teaching of Oriental languages and the founding of chairs for Arabic at universities such as Bologna, Paris and Oxford

– early printed editions in Turkish, Persian and Arabic

– technical issues arising from printing with Arabic type; the availability and sourcing of materials for printing Arabic; the centres for printing with Arabic type; the printers, correctors and typesetters of Arabic type; printing Arabic-, Persian- and Turkish-language books with non-Arabic type

– early Oriental dictionaries, grammars, phrasebooks and their authors

– bible translations into Arabic, Persian and Turkish

– Qurʾānic studies in early modern Europe

– Oriental manuscripts in royal, public, ecclesiastical, university and private early modern libraries; scholarly collections of Oriental books

 

If you would like to join us, please send an e-mail to me, Nil Palabiyik (nil.palabiyik@lmu.de), immediately to register your interest.

I will need:

– a paper title (15-word maximum)

– an abstract (150-word maximum)

– a short CV

– your full name, current affiliation, and email address

 

by 5 August at the latest.

Tags:  Arabic  book history  cultural history  early modern  Hebrew  history  History of Science  Humanism  interdisciplinary  Oriental studies  Orientalism  Ottoman  Persian  Turkish 

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Printing, Reception, Editing, and Teaching Thomas More and Early Humanists

Posted By Emily A. Ransom, Tuesday, July 24, 2018
The Amici Thomae Mori is excited to welcome proposals for papers on Thomas More studies to coincide with the publication of the new Essential Works of Thomas More (Yale University Press, 2019).  This single-volume, accessible, readable edition will be the third major collection of More’s works in nearly five hundred years, after the 1557 Workes published by More’s nephew William Rastell and the Yale Complete Works in fifteen volumes completed in 1997. Though papers on all areas of Thomas More studies will be considered, the Amici is especially interested in topics that will complement this important publication, such as print history of humanist texts, reception history of Thomas More and early humanists, editing humanist texts, and teaching humanist texts in the modern classroom.

To submit a paper, please send your title (15-word max), abstract (150-word max), a few keywords, CV, PhD completion date (past or expected), and affiliation to Emily Ransom (ransome@uwgb.edu) by August 10, 2018.  

Tags:  archives  book history  catholic reform  circulation  classical reception  cultural history  devotion  history  history of reading  history of the book  Humanism  interdisciplinary  literature  pedagogy  philosophy  political history  print culture  publishers  religion  transmission 

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Reappraisals of Renaissance Perspective

Posted By Tawrin Baker, Thursday, July 19, 2018

Fifty years ago, the status of linear perspective was clear: It was a technical achievement that signaled the rationality of sight and paved the way for the scientific revolution. In the succeeding years, scholars have argued for the incoherence of both the perspective (Elkins) and scientific revolution (Shapin) concepts. It is now not so clear how to link the rendering of space in a painting to larger intellectual developments in the sciences, culture or society. At best perspective represents a separate practice. At worse it is merely a fetish of European exceptionalism. 

 

As the postmodern critique of science has weakened and some embrace of it seems politically necessary (e.g. the climate change debate), how would this affect our understanding of linear perspective? This panel seeks to address this question by asking: 

  • What were the varieties of Renaissance perspective, and more broadly what was the larger economy of geometrical knowing?
  • How are applying divisions of theory and practice, or strictly geometric versus logistical concerns, relevant to discerning progressive knowledge? 
  • Does the clarification of artistic intentions help understand the perspectivist’s knowledge (e.g. for Piero della Francesca) 
  • Who actually had the abilities to apply rigorous perspective versus the everyday shortcut uses? 
  • What is at stake, for us right now, in the study of Renaissance perspective?

The panel especially seeks to move beyond entrenched positions - a reactionary scientistic view of perspective or a critical, deflationary view. We are interested in cases where linkages emerge but which demand a new understanding or contextualization of knowledge in the early modern period. 

 

By August 1st, please send an abstract of no more than 150 words, with keywords, and a brief cv to Tawrin Baker (tawrin@sas.upenn.edu) and Ian Verstegen (verstege@sas.upenn.edu). 

Tags:  Art History  early modern  Geometry  History of Science  Humanism  interdisciplinary  Perspective 

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