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Interdisciplinary and Miscellaneous CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
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This blog is for CfPs for interdisciplinary sessions for RSA 2019 Toronto, as well as those that do not fit into the Art History, History, or Literature discipline categories. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Top tags: literature  art history  interdisciplinary  early modern  material culture  social history  art  book history  cultural history  gender  history  architecture  print culture  religion  circulation  classical reception  global  History of Science  identity  patronage  political history  transcultural  courts  digital humanities  gender studies  history of reading  Humanism  Philosophy  urban spaces  visual arts 

Secrecy, Catholicism, and Spycraft in Early Modern England

Posted By Kristin M. Bezio, Friday, July 27, 2018

The Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association is sponsoring a panel on Secrecy, Catholicism, and Spycraft in Early Modern England. We are seeking proposals which address the suppression, persecution, and preservation of Catholicism and Catholic praxis in early modern England following the Henrician Reformation up to 1660. We are interested in cross-disciplinary perspectives, including art and architectural history; literary depictions and works; social and cultural history; Recusant and Jesuit history; and other approaches.

Please send abstracts (150 words or less) and CVs (including expected date of completion for dissertation, if not already completed) to kbezio@richmond.edu by August 10th.

Tags:  Catholicism  cultural history  early modern  England  Literature  reformation  religion  social history  spies 

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Representations and Reality of The Early Modern English Marketplace

Posted By Kristin M. Bezio, Friday, July 27, 2018

The Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association is sponsoring a panel on Representations and Reality of The Early Modern English Marketplace. We are seeking paper proposals from any/all disciplines which discuss depictions, realities, and/or materialities of markets and marketplaces, including literary, artistic, musical, or historical contexts.

Please send abstracts (150 words or less) and CVs (including expected date of completion for dissertation, if not already completed) to kbezio@richmond.edu by August 10th.

Tags:  Art History  cultural history  Literature  markets  material culture  social history 

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Women’s Power and Mobility in the Renaissance

Posted By Kristin M. Bezio, Friday, July 27, 2018

The Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association is sponsoring a panel on Women’s Power and Mobility in the Renaissance. We are seeking paper proposals from any/all disciplines which address questions of women's mobility and power through art, music, or literature; in the social or political spheres; or within religious praxis or communities.

Please send abstracts (150 words or less) and CVs (including expected date of completion for dissertation, if not already completed) to kbezio@richmond.edu by August 10th.

Tags:  Literature  political history  religion  social history 

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Wonder Women: Amazons in the Early Modern European Imagination

Posted By Victoria G. Fanti, Thursday, July 26, 2018
Updated: Thursday, July 26, 2018

Session chair: Gerry Milligan, CUNY

The blockbuster success of the 2017 film Wonder Woman reignited a global interest in the figure of the Amazon, eliciting celebrations of female strength and independence alongside debates about her exoticism and sexualization. A sequel, already highly anticipated by many, is slated for release in late 2019.

Such a widespread interest in the Amazonian warrior-woman—both her allure and her paradox—is not, however, a new phenomenon; the Amazons likewise captured the popular and elite imagination of the Early Modern period, featuring in literary productions across Europe. Building on scholarship by Frédérique Verrier, Kathryn Schwarz, Sarah Colvin and Helen Watanabe-O’Kelly, Eleonora Stoppino, and Gerry Milligan (among many others), this panel seeks to put Early Modern representations of Amazons into dialogue with one another, across linguistic traditions and national borders, in order to explore the nuances of how these women were imagined, discussed, and disseminated across Europe.

We welcome papers that explore questions of sexuality, female violence, gender-bending, orientalism, politics, and the like. Texts and themes of interest might include, but are not limited to:        

-       Histories (and “histories”) of the Amazons

-       Literary and poetic imaginations of Amazonian women and/or their descendants, such as in the epic-chivalric tradition or in theater and/or opera

-       Treatises, dialogues, or correspondences that make reference to Amazons in order to engage with the querelle des femmes

-       The Early Modern use of Amazonian lore or symbolism for encomiastic purposes

 

Please send questions and/or abstracts (150 words) with a brief biography, A/V requests, and keywords to Victoria Fanti at vfanti1@jhu.edu by August 3

Tags:  French literature  gender  gender studies  German literature  Iberian Peninsula  interdisciplinary  Italian literature  Literature  Spain  women 

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Printing, Reception, Editing, and Teaching Thomas More and Early Humanists

Posted By Emily A. Ransom, Tuesday, July 24, 2018
The Amici Thomae Mori is excited to welcome proposals for papers on Thomas More studies to coincide with the publication of the new Essential Works of Thomas More (Yale University Press, 2019).  This single-volume, accessible, readable edition will be the third major collection of More’s works in nearly five hundred years, after the 1557 Workes published by More’s nephew William Rastell and the Yale Complete Works in fifteen volumes completed in 1997. Though papers on all areas of Thomas More studies will be considered, the Amici is especially interested in topics that will complement this important publication, such as print history of humanist texts, reception history of Thomas More and early humanists, editing humanist texts, and teaching humanist texts in the modern classroom.

To submit a paper, please send your title (15-word max), abstract (150-word max), a few keywords, CV, PhD completion date (past or expected), and affiliation to Emily Ransom (ransome@uwgb.edu) by August 10, 2018.  

Tags:  archives  book history  catholic reform  circulation  classical reception  cultural history  devotion  history  history of reading  history of the book  Humanism  interdisciplinary  literature  pedagogy  philosophy  political history  print culture  publishers  religion  transmission 

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In Search of the Canon: Poets and Artists Confronting with their Models (c. 1500-1700)

Posted By Maria G. Matarazzo, Thursday, July 19, 2018

The theory of Imitation was a central topic of discussion in the ‘Republic of Letters’. The European community of humanists, philosophers, poets and artists was engaged in the dispute over the models to refer to during the creative process. How to develop a normative canon as a reference point for artists and writers in the practice of Imitation? Which poets and artists to select as the examples of ‘bello stile’?

While the authority of ancient models was universally acknowledged, the building of a canon of modern masters was under discussion. One of the typical environments of this discussion were the Academies, where writers, artists, philosophers, antiquarians gathered around learned patrons.

Considering the interdisciplinary nature of this debate, this panel aims to explore the construction of a canon through a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective. The main purpose is not only to study the mechanisms implied in the building of the canon but also to bring out the intersections between Art and Literature concerning this topic.

Questions to be considered include but are not limited to: the institutions where the debate took place, with a particular focus on the Academies; rhetorical devices for debating the canon and the metaphors of Imitation; the circulation of the canon through publishing, printings, new editions and reproductive printmaking; the impact of the canon on the teaching practices.

 

Please submit proposals to Ida Duretto (ida.duretto@sns.it) and Maria Gabriella Matarazzo (mariagabriella.matarazzo@sns.it) by August 12, 2018.

Proposals should include a paper title, an abstract (150-word maximum), keywords and a CV (300-word maximum).

Tags:  academies  Art History  book history  cultural history  early modern  history of reading  history of the book  Imitation  interdisciplinary  literature  mimesis  patronage  philology  Poetry  print culture  publishers  reproductive prints  the canon  visual arts 

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Defining Space: Walls and Cities in the Early Modern World

Posted By Luis J. Gordo Pelaez, Thursday, July 19, 2018

Walls have been an omnipresent feature of human settlements since ancient times. Even today they continue to be apart of our daily life and discourse, whether for politically driven purposes (i.e. US border “security”) or satyr (i.e. the now defunk website, Bricking it for Canada). Whether ancient or contemporary, walls have contributed to defining and redefining spaces, creating a sense of place and identity, demarcating physical boundaries, and imposing socio-economic hierarchies of inclusion and exclusion. In the context of early modern cities, walls experienced a resurgence as a consequence, among others, of expanding empires and colonizing efforts, the development of warfare technology and new systems of fortification, and the implementation of directives regarding the distribution and use of urban space. Whether materialized or not (Richard Kagan has examined their absence in inland colonial Spanish America), walls were a common occurrence in the schemes of early modern urban theorists and planners, and a frequent instrument of discussion in the political and socio-economic plans of absolute regimes, particularly in foreign dominions. For better or worse, walls have maintained their relevance. Framed by contemporary understandings of walls, this session aims to examine the relationship between cities and walls during the early modern era from a global comparative perspective. Papers that interrogate this interplay in any of its manifestations (conceptualization and building, notions of agency and perception associated with these infrastructures, the dichotomy inside/outside, narrative and graphic representation, and materiality) during the period 1300-1700 are particularly welcome to this comparative panel. 

 

Please send paper titles (15-word max.); abstracts (150-word max.); brief CVs; PhD competition date (past or expected); full name, current affiliation, and e-mail address to organizers (Cody Barteet, cbarteet@uwo.ca; and Luis Gordo-Peláez, luisgordopelaez@csufresno.edu) by August 8, 2018. Submission guidelines are available at https://www.rsa.org/page/2019SubmissionsGuide .

Tags:  architecture  art  art history  city  cultural history  early modern  history  identity  literature  material culture  representation  seventeenth century  sixteenth century  social history  urban spaces  urban studies  urbanism  walls 

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Renaissance Vegetarianism - Deadline Extended

Posted By Andrea Crow, Monday, July 16, 2018

The study of early modern food has blossomed in recent years. As scholars have parsed the politics of changing dining practices, the role of recipes in intellectual history, and the growing perception of food ethics as inextricable from social identity, dietary beliefs and habits have begun to be seen as central to early modern studies. One of the most striking dietary trends that spread across Europe in this period, however, remains underexamined: the rise of vegetarianism.


This panel invites papers from across disciplines that examine Renaissance vegetarianism in order to think through the intertwining religious, economic, political, and ethical motives that spurred this transnational movement forward. Possible topics might include views on vegetarianism in the early modern dietary sciences, radical vegetarian leaders and the communities that they organized, vegetarian cuisine and recipe books, the revival of Classical vegetarian thought, or the representation of vegetarianism in literature and the arts.


Proposals should include the presenter’s name, academic affiliation, email address, paper title (15 words maximum), abstract (150 words maximum), and CV (300 words maximum). Please submit proposals by August 1st to Andrea Crow (andrea.crow@bc.edu).

Tags:  art history  ethics  food studies  interdisciplinary  literature  political history  recipe books  vegetarianism 

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Renaissance Philosophy

Posted By David A. Lines, Friday, July 13, 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS: Renaissance Philosophy

(Deadline: 25 July 2018)

 

Papers and/or panels on Renaissance Philosophy are invited for the 65thAnnual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America (17-19 March 2019) in Toronto, Canada. Although papers on all aspects of Renaissance philosophy and thought will be considered, preference will be given to those focusing on one or more of the following topics:

-ethics and politics (in particular, how the ties between these two areas shift during the period in question)

-philosophy across languages (including the rise of philosophy in the vernacular; the relationship of vernacular philosophy to that produced in other vernaculars or in Hebrew, Arabic, Greek, Latin; issues of “translation” in philosophy)

-philosophy and literature

-Aristotelianism and anti-Aristotelianism (including the Plato–Aristotle controversy)

-intersections between philosophy and history of the book 

 

We aim for a good chronological and geographical spread where possible and appropriate.

Proposals for papers should include:

-      the presenter’s name, academic affiliation, email address

-      the paper title (up to 15 words)

-      a paper abstract (up to 150 words)

-      a tabular academic CV (up to 300 words; indicate date of PhD)

-      up to four keywords

-      specification of any AV or computer projection needs. 

Proposals for panels should include:

-      a panel title (up to 15 words) and panel keywords

-      a panel abstract (no longer than 150 words)

-      specification of panel chair (and respondent, if foreseen), along with affiliation and email address

-      a one-page CV for each organizer andparticipant in tabular format (max. 300 words each; indicate date of PhD)

-      for each paper: as above (“papers”)

-      specification of any AV or computer projection needs

 

Please submit your proposal as a single Word document to Professor David Lines (discipline representative for Philosophy) at d.a.lines@warwick.ac.uk by25 July2018. Decisions will be communicated by the end of July.

Tags:  Arabic  book history  ethics  Greek  Hebrew  interdisciplinary  Latin  literature  philosophy  politics  translation  vernacular 

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Imaginative Intersections between Writers and Artists in the Seventeenth Century: New Thoughts on an Old Theme

Posted By Alexandra C. Hoare, Tuesday, July 10, 2018

The fertile intersections between literature and the visual arts in the seventeenth century, which impact upon and give unique shape to the creative outputs of that historical moment, have received a wealth of scholarly attention over the decades. This phenomenon continues to compel and to generate important, fruitful and even ground-breaking discussion within the various disciplines concerned with the literary and the visual/artistic, either by inflecting or overturning long-standing assumptions about the nature of that relationship or by building significantly upon the extant repertoire of topics with which we have become so familiar (among them the ‘ut pictura poesis’ theme). This panel invites papers that contribute meaningfully to this ongoing discussion by seeking to significantly expand, nuance or problematize extant narratives of the ‘text-image’ relationship within the seventeenth century, broadly conceived and approached from diverse disciplinary perspectives. Papers might address one of the following topics:

- new forms of artistic iconography or style that find a basis in contemporary texts

- a consideration of previously neglected or understudied protagonists in artistic and/or literary fields

- overlooked contexts of literary engagement on the part of artists

- the concept of authorship, within the context of seventeenth-century literary and/or artistic practice and theory

- the impact on artistic production of as-yet unknown or alternative forms of text or writing

- relationships between text and image in the context of previously under-researched or new media, in either visual/artistic or literary fields

- text-image connections that appear within new cultural or geographic contexts of creative production in the period

Proposals should include the presenter’s name, academic affiliation, email address, paper title (15 words maximum), abstract (150 words maximum), PhD completion date, and CV (300 words maximum). Please submit proposals by July 30th to Carlo Avilio (carloavilio@gmail.com) and Alex Hoare (alex.hoare@bristol.ac.uk).

Tags:  art  image  literature  poetry  seventeenth century  text 

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