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Interdisciplinary and Miscellaneous CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
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This blog is for CfPs for interdisciplinary sessions for RSA 2019 Toronto, as well as those that do not fit into the Art History, History, or Literature discipline categories. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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CFP: Medicine, books, & herbs: pharmacology in Renaissance Europe

Posted By Caroline Petit, Thursday, July 26, 2018

Call For Papers

Renaissance Society of America

Annual Conference, March 17-19, 2019, Toronto, Canada

 

Medicine, books, & herbs: pharmacology in Renaissance Europe

 

This panel invites papers dedicated to pharmacological works and their readership in Renaissance Europe. Following the rediscovery of ancient medical works on drugs (notably Dioscorides’ and Galen’s) and the rise of new Latin translations, pharmacology as a field began to take shape in early modern Europe. The conflation of old texts and ancient authorities with new discoveries on the ground, in the Mediterranean, in the New World and in the East, resulted in a complex pattern of enduring old frameworks and new material. This panel aims at promoting detailed analyses of texts, with the hope to shed light on little-known authors and works. It also aims at examining potential interactions between new and ancient knowledge, and the dynamics of “reception” in the wake of an expanded, problematic world.

 

 

Interested participants are encouraged to consider the following themes:

 

*the role of herbs, drugs and antidotes (and especially theriac) in Renaissance texts (medical and not)

*the reception of ancient and medieval works on pharmacology (especially Galen)

*the diffusion of pharmacological knowledge throughout Renaissance Europe through books and other forms of communication

*methodological and theoretical discussion in pharmacology

*the role of currently under-researched medical authors (such as Prospero Alpini) in the development of pharmacology

*the role of translators and travellers in enriching the materia medica

*the importance of colonial approaches in the formation of early modern pharmacology

*national/nativist traditions in pharmacology

 

 

This panel is sponsored by the Medicine & Science discipline representative.

 

Please submit short abstract (150 words max.) and brief CV (one page max.) by August 8, 2018 to Caroline Petit at the following address : agostino@carolinepetit.net

Tags:  book history  classical reception  history of medicine  Humanism  microhistory  print culture  Renaissance 

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The Future and Futurity in Renaissance Europe

Posted By Nicholas S. Baker, Sunday, June 3, 2018

Organizers: Jeroen Puttevils (University of Antwerp) & Nicholas Scott Baker (Macquarie University)

How did women and men think about the future in Europe between the fourteenth and seventeenth centuries? The sixteenth-century French philosopher Michel de Montaigne already castigated his contemporaries for their obsession with the future in his Essais(Part 1, chapter XI). Montaigne argued that this was a futile pursuit, since one cannot control what will occur in the future. Moreover, an obsession about the future diverted attention from what required scrutiny in the present. 

In this session we are especially interested in how perceptions of the future related to actions in the (past) present. Did ideas about the future affect people making plans? Ideally, we’d like to have various social groups, their perceptions of the future and the actions motivated by their ideas about the future represented: merchants, diplomats, court astrologers, farmers, royals and state officials, craftsmen, churchmen… Recent research by the organizers of the session has shown the social nature of thinking about the future, both how ideas of the future are formed, and how they could differ along social profiles. Moreover, we hope to demonstrate the co-existence and interaction of various forms of future expectations in Renaissance European societies. This sessions seeks to test grand narratives such as those of Reinhart Koselleck (1979) and Lucian Hölscher (1999) on changes in thinking about the future (which are based on elite and canonical authors). We hope to attract papers analyzing original sources produced by the social groups mentioned above from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.

Paper proposals (and inquiries about this session) should be sent to Jeroen Puttevils, jeroen.puttevils@uantwerpen.be by 1 August 2018. The proposal should include: 1) a title; 2) abstract (150 words max.); 3) short CV (300 words max.); 4) list of five keywords; 5) indication of whether you have any audio / visual needs.

Tags:  Future  Renaissance  Temporality  Time 

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The Society for Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy Call for Papers RSA 2019

Posted By Sean D. Erwin, Friday, June 1, 2018
Updated: Friday, June 1, 2018

The Society for Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy will sponsor several panels at the 2019 annual meeting of the Renaissance Society of America in Toronto, March 17th to 19th, 2019.  We welcome proposals on any relevant theme, but we are especially interested in the following topics:

·           Medieval and Renaissance accounts of language.

·           The transmission of Medieval and Renaissance authors in Early Modernity.

·           Discussions of critical receptions of Medieval and Renaissance authors

and the interpretive effects these readings engendered.

·           Themes linked to work on Machiavelli and Lucretius and their transmission.

Please submit a paper title, abstract (150 words) and abbreviated CV (300 words) to Sean Erwin (Serwin@barry.edu) by Monday July 16th, 2018.  Papers should have a presentation length of twenty minutes or less and should be delivered in English.

 In line with RSA guidelines, presenters must have a PhD or other terminal degree or be an advanced dissertation candidate presenting on a topic derived from their current dissertation research.  For complete submission guidelines please see: https://www.rsa.org/page/2019SubmissionsGuide

Due to changes to the RSA conference planning schedule, Associate Organizations like the SMRP will not be notified of approved panels until November 1st, 2018.  The deadline for conference registration is December 15th, 2018.  Please note: to present at the RSA one must pay for RSA membership for the conference year in question. 

We would also ask that presenters consider becoming members of the SMRP.  To become a member visit http://smrpphil.org/ and click Membership.

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Tags:  early modern  medieval  philosophy  Renaissance 

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