This website uses cookies to store information on your computer. Some of these cookies are used for visitor analysis, others are essential to making our site function properly and improve the user experience. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Click Accept to consent and dismiss this message or Deny to leave this website. Read our Privacy Statement for more.
Print Page   |   Sign In   |   Register
Interdisciplinary and Miscellaneous CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
Blog Home All Blogs
This blog is for CfPs for interdisciplinary sessions for RSA 2019 Toronto, as well as those that do not fit into the Art History, History, or Literature discipline categories. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: literature  art history  interdisciplinary  early modern  material culture  social history  art  book history  cultural history  gender  history  architecture  print culture  religion  circulation  classical reception  global  History of Science  identity  patronage  political history  transcultural  courts  digital humanities  gender studies  history of reading  Humanism  Philosophy  urban spaces  visual arts 

Defining Space: Walls and Cities in the Early Modern World

Posted By Luis J. Gordo Pelaez, Thursday, July 19, 2018

Walls have been an omnipresent feature of human settlements since ancient times. Even today they continue to be apart of our daily life and discourse, whether for politically driven purposes (i.e. US border “security”) or satyr (i.e. the now defunk website, Bricking it for Canada). Whether ancient or contemporary, walls have contributed to defining and redefining spaces, creating a sense of place and identity, demarcating physical boundaries, and imposing socio-economic hierarchies of inclusion and exclusion. In the context of early modern cities, walls experienced a resurgence as a consequence, among others, of expanding empires and colonizing efforts, the development of warfare technology and new systems of fortification, and the implementation of directives regarding the distribution and use of urban space. Whether materialized or not (Richard Kagan has examined their absence in inland colonial Spanish America), walls were a common occurrence in the schemes of early modern urban theorists and planners, and a frequent instrument of discussion in the political and socio-economic plans of absolute regimes, particularly in foreign dominions. For better or worse, walls have maintained their relevance. Framed by contemporary understandings of walls, this session aims to examine the relationship between cities and walls during the early modern era from a global comparative perspective. Papers that interrogate this interplay in any of its manifestations (conceptualization and building, notions of agency and perception associated with these infrastructures, the dichotomy inside/outside, narrative and graphic representation, and materiality) during the period 1300-1700 are particularly welcome to this comparative panel. 

 

Please send paper titles (15-word max.); abstracts (150-word max.); brief CVs; PhD competition date (past or expected); full name, current affiliation, and e-mail address to organizers (Cody Barteet, cbarteet@uwo.ca; and Luis Gordo-Peláez, luisgordopelaez@csufresno.edu) by August 8, 2018. Submission guidelines are available at https://www.rsa.org/page/2019SubmissionsGuide .

Tags:  architecture  art  art history  city  cultural history  early modern  history  identity  literature  material culture  representation  seventeenth century  sixteenth century  social history  urban spaces  urban studies  urbanism  walls 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Classical Origins of Renaissance Aesthetics

Posted By Caroline G. Stark, Friday, July 13, 2018

The Society for Early Modern Classical Reception (SEMCR) welcomes proposals for papers to be delivered at the 2019 meeting of the Renaissance Society of America in Toronto. For one of its four panels, SEMCR invites abstracts on the reception of classical theories of poetics and aesthetic experience in Renaissance art and music.

 

Plato’s and Aristotle’s theories of mimesis, Horace’s Ars Poetica, and “Longinus”’s sublime have long dominated discussions of early modern aesthetics. Scholars have also sought to trace the influence of other, less explicitly didactic texts in defining the origin and value of art and the aesthetic experience in the Renaissance. Paul Barolsky, for example, has argued that Ovid's Metamorphoses lies at the heart of Renaissance aesthetics, whether in the story of Pygmalion bringing art to life or, conversely, Medusa's petrifaction of the living as competing metaphors for sculpture. Barolsky likewise sees Ovidian transformation behind Michelangelo’s “non finito” and in the depiction of Botticelli’s Chloris becoming Flora in the Primavera. Wendy Heller has explored the ways in which Monteverdi and Busenello’s groundbreaking opera L’incoronazione di Poppea draws upon and challenges Tacitus’ methods of historiography. More recently, Sarah Blake McHam has argued for the pervasive influence of Pliny’s Natural History and its emphasis on life-like “naturalism” from Petrarch to Caravaggio and Poussin.  


Building on these and other studies that move beyond questions of classical influence on the subject matter of Renaissance texts, this panel seeks papers that explore the strategies through which visual artists and musicians draw on classical aesthetics and the extent to which these hidden roots underlie Renaissance theory and practice.


The Society is committed to creating a congenial and collaborative forum for the infusion of new ideas into classics and early modern studies, and hence welcomes abstracts that are exploratory in nature as well as abstracts of latter-stage research.


Abstracts of no more than 150 words and a short CV of no more than 300 words should be sent as separate email attachments to caroline.stark@howard.edu (see the RSA's abstract guidelines and CV guidelines and models).  The abstracts will be judged anonymously: please do not identify yourself in any way on the abstract page.  Proposals must be received by August 10, 2018.


Please include in the body of the email:


• your name, affiliation, email address

• your paper title (15-word maximum)

• relevant keywords

Tags:  aesthetic experience  aesthetics  art  classical literature  classical reception  mimesis  music 

Permalink
 

CfP: Beyond the Microcosm: The Impact of Confraternities on the Civic Sphere.

Posted By Samantha J. Hughes-Johnson, Friday, July 13, 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS

(Deadline: 1 August 2018)

 

The Society for Confraternity Studies will sponsor a number of sessions at the 65th Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America (17 - 19 March 2019) in Toronto, Canada. Accordingly, it invites proposals for papers on the following theme:

 

Beyond the Microcosm: The Impact of Confraternities on the Civic Sphere.

 

Since the formation of the Society for Confraternity Studies, which celebrates it 30th anniversary in 2019, the subject of Confraternity Studies has moved on from what Konrad Eisenbichler once described as an “invisible history” to become an authoritative sub-field of late medieval and early modern scholarship. Accordingly, in order to encourage a discourse that places confraternities at the center of essential historical developments rather than at their periphery, we invite proposals for papers that explore the amplitude and impact of lay sodalities in Europe, the Americas, the East and Asia in relation to the activities of wider late medieval and early modern society. Papers might focus on, but are not limited to the following topics:

·     The reach and range of lesser traversed sodalities. For example, slave confraternities.

·     The relationships between lay companies and non members. For instance, confraternal liaisons with artisans, food merchants or second-hand clothes sellers.

·     Confratelli and consorelle entrusted with public service, healthcare and the custody of people or objects.

·     The influence of confraternal ritual and recreation on urban spaces.

·     Individual and familial investment in lay companies in order to garner social influence or to gain political power.

·     Associations between the devotional lives of non-clerics and the ordained: how these affinities played out in rituals, drama and music.

·     The impact of art, architecture and ephemera commissioned by confraternities on public spaces and/or the popular conscience.

Papers should concentrate on confraternal activities between 1300 and 1700. We are however, also particularly interested in proposals that discuss retrospectively, the value of studies that have emerged since the conference in 1989 and consider how Confraternity Studies will advance into the twenty-first century.

Proposals should include the presenter’s name, academic affiliation, email, the paper title (no longer than 15 words), the abstract of the paper (no longer than 150 words), a brief academic C.V. (not longer than 300 words), and a series of key-words that suit the presentation. Please be sure all nine (7) categories of information are clearly provided. 

Please submit your proposal to Dr Samantha J.C. Hughes-Johnson at samanthajanecaroline@yahoo.co.uk by 1 August 2018.

 

Tags:  architecture  art  artisans  confraternity  contested spaces  early modern global exchange  ephemera  healthcare  hospital  lay company  material culture  merchants  political power  public service  recreation  retrospective discussion  ritual  social influence  sodality  urban spaces 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Imaginative Intersections between Writers and Artists in the Seventeenth Century: New Thoughts on an Old Theme

Posted By Alexandra C. Hoare, Tuesday, July 10, 2018

The fertile intersections between literature and the visual arts in the seventeenth century, which impact upon and give unique shape to the creative outputs of that historical moment, have received a wealth of scholarly attention over the decades. This phenomenon continues to compel and to generate important, fruitful and even ground-breaking discussion within the various disciplines concerned with the literary and the visual/artistic, either by inflecting or overturning long-standing assumptions about the nature of that relationship or by building significantly upon the extant repertoire of topics with which we have become so familiar (among them the ‘ut pictura poesis’ theme). This panel invites papers that contribute meaningfully to this ongoing discussion by seeking to significantly expand, nuance or problematize extant narratives of the ‘text-image’ relationship within the seventeenth century, broadly conceived and approached from diverse disciplinary perspectives. Papers might address one of the following topics:

- new forms of artistic iconography or style that find a basis in contemporary texts

- a consideration of previously neglected or understudied protagonists in artistic and/or literary fields

- overlooked contexts of literary engagement on the part of artists

- the concept of authorship, within the context of seventeenth-century literary and/or artistic practice and theory

- the impact on artistic production of as-yet unknown or alternative forms of text or writing

- relationships between text and image in the context of previously under-researched or new media, in either visual/artistic or literary fields

- text-image connections that appear within new cultural or geographic contexts of creative production in the period

Proposals should include the presenter’s name, academic affiliation, email address, paper title (15 words maximum), abstract (150 words maximum), PhD completion date, and CV (300 words maximum). Please submit proposals by July 30th to Carlo Avilio (carloavilio@gmail.com) and Alex Hoare (alex.hoare@bristol.ac.uk).

Tags:  art  image  literature  poetry  seventeenth century  text 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Kircher’s World

Posted By Thomas Beachdel, Friday, June 15, 2018
Updated: Friday, June 15, 2018

Call For Papers

Renaissance Society of America

Annual Conference, March 17-19, 2019, Toronto, Canada

Kircher’s World

This panel invites papers on the work, influence, or problematization of the seventeenth-century polymath, Athanasius Kircher (1602-1680). A category defying figure caught between the encyclopaedism of the Renaissance and the turn toward specialized knowledge, Kircher has not received the attention of his more “scientific” contemporaries, such as Kepler or Newton, and is often regarded as an outside figure, given his penchant for the arcane, the mysterious, and his adherence to the Hermetic tradition, despite the work of Copernicus. At the same time, the vast outpouring of Kircher’s work on a broad range of subjects—Egyptian civilization and hieroglyphs (Oedipus Aegyptiacus), music (Musurgia Universalis), China (China Monumentis), geology (Mundus Subterraneus)—was extremely influential to a wide audience during his lifetime. Of particular interest are papers dealing with Kircher’s Mundus Subterraneus and the influence of this text and his viewpoint on geology, theories of the formation of the earth, and volcanism.

Session Chair: Thomas Beachdel, CUNY, Hostos

Please submit a short (max. 150 word) abstract and CV by July 31, 2018 to: thomas.beachdel@gmail.com

Tags:  art  art history  book history  circulation  cultural history  early modern  History of Science  interdisciplinary  print culture  transcultural  visual arts  visual culturecirculation 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Beyond Eastern Europe, 1400–1700

Posted By Tomasz Grusiecki, Tuesday, May 22, 2018
Updated: Saturday, July 21, 2018

In the early modern period, eastern Europe was a mosaic of cultures. Multi-ethnic, multi-lingual and multi-denominational, it was situated at the crossroads of trade routes, political affairs, and cultural flows. Yet in the eighteenth century, the region’s perceived distance from the main centers of the Enlightenment led to its subsequent framing as the space of socio-economic backwardness, political disorder and cultural periphery. This binary positioning has had profound consequences on the perceptions of this region to this day.

 

This panel seeks to explore and redress two interconnected problems: (1) the terminology and methodologies that have been applied to conceptually situate the lands between the Baltic and Black Seas—for example, the ‘East’, ‘periphery’, and more recently, ‘borderland’; (2) and, in turn, the different ways in which art, architecture and literature can challenge the conventional definitions of the region.

 

We thus invite scholars of central and eastern Europe to explore new approaches, terms, and questions that address the place of this region in its various complexities and thematic contexts. We seek papers that cover any aspect of culture (art, architecture, material culture, literature) that might shed new light on the region from within, across, and from without.

 

Please send a 150-word abstract and a brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum) to Katie Jakobiec (katie.jakobiec@worc.ox.ac.uk) and Tomasz Grusiecki (tomaszgrusiecki@boisestate.edu) before Monday, 6 August 2018. Presenters will have to be active RSA members.

Tags:  architecture  art  Art History  central Europe  circulation  cultural history  eastern Europe  global  literature  material culture  transcultural  visual culturecirculation 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Parallel Patronage: Art and Social Antagonism in Italian Cities (1400-1600).

Posted By Marcello Calogero, Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Organizers: Saida Bondini, Courtauld Institute of Art/University of Lausanne and Marcello Calogero, Scuola Normale Superiore. 

 

 

The interplay between artistic patronage and socio-political power has long been at the centre of scholarly writings. Scholarship has deeply investigated the visual strategies put in place by princes, kings, and ruling families, to reinforce their political preeminence and convey an image of absolute power. Thus, public sites of patronage were often employed to make manifest the presence of the ruler in the city.

Despite these hierarchical systems, various centres of power existed. In courtly and oligarchic contexts, many individuals or families not having a political position relied on considerable financial means and newly acquired social status. Often in these cases, the lack of institutional power was counterbalanced by a pursuit for social distinction, fostered, also, through artistic patronage. This was made possible by conspicuous wealth, sometimes even surpassing that of the ruling power.

Tensions arising from this socio-political condition affected not only courtly enviroments. Cities like Venice or Bologna promoted an ideal egalitarianism between the members of the oligarchic power, but this often led to social clashes that impacted the practice of commissioning art. In these cases proper strategies of parallel patronage emerged.

This panel aims to determine the extent to which these conflicts were visualised and displayed in the urban public spaces of Italian cities. Do typological, stylistic, and iconographical choices allow us to trace these kind of social tensions? To what extent were ‘parallel patrons’ perceived as a threat to centralised power? When and why were princely or dominant patterns imitated or deliberately challenged? And finally, how can we track those reactions? Are there any documentary or literary sources which give an idea of the extent to which these practices were publicly disapproved of or accepted?

 

Papers are welcome from postgraduate, early career and established researchers working in different fields (art history, history, literature, etc.). Proposals of no more than 300 words can be submitted together with a short CV to Marcello Calogero (marcello.calogero@sns.it) and Saida Bondini (saida.bondini@courtauld.ac.uk) by June 30.

Tags:  art  courts  italian art  patronage 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Fiat Lux: Art, Religion, and Science in Early Modern Italy

Posted By Steven J. Cody, Thursday, May 3, 2018

Light is essential to the visual arts and, indeed, to vision itself. Over seventy years ago, Millard Meiss drew our attention to the ethereal, often overlooked representation of light in some fifteenth-century paintings, eventually arguing that it “could become a major pictorial theme.” As we now know, Renaissance artists engaged with notions of divinity, sacred wisdom, and visual experience—all through the effects of light. But how does one talk, in any serious manner, about something that is fundamentally intangible? The ethereal nature of light presents a challenge for the artist who attempts to depict it, the beholder who attempts to appreciate it, and the art historian who attempts to study it.

 

These panels serve as a forum for scholars who explore light’s formal, symbolic, metaphoric, and scientific dimensions. We seek participants who take innovative approaches to pictorial light and to theories of sight. Presenters are welcome to consider works of art produced in any of Italy’s locales and at any point in the early modern period, so long as the works are religious in nature. Papers that adopt an interdisciplinary focus are especially encouraged. It is our hope that, through these conversations, we will be able to reconstruct the rich context in which art, religion, and science found a common language in light.


Proposal Instructions:

Please send proposals and direct any queries to both Eric Hupe (erh4vv@virginia.edu) and Steven Cody (codys@pfw.edu). Proposals must be submitted by 1 August and include the following items:

- The presenter’s name, affiliation, and email address
- The paper’s title
- An abstract (150-word maximum)
- Keywords
- A brief CV

- PhD completion date (past or expected)

Tags:  art  History of Science  Italy  light  religion 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Deadline extended - CfP: Art Beyond Spanish Italy, 1500-1700

Posted By Emily B. Wood, Thursday, May 3, 2018
Updated: Saturday, July 21, 2018

Session Sponsored by the Italian Art Society (IAS)

“Your interest in Italy is the main artery by which the pulse of all your power beats…”
(Charles V to Philip II, 1555)

By the end of the sixteenth century, the Spanish crown controlled major regions of the Italian Peninsula, from the Kingdom of Naples to the Duchy of Milan. At the same time, areas outside of Spanish sovereignty, including the Italian Republics, Tuscany, Mantua, and the Papal States, felt the effects of Spain’s “soft” imperialism (Dandelet, 2001) in economic, social, and cultural
spheres. This panel focuses on art-historical approaches that explore the question of Spanish cultural imperialism on the Italian Peninsula outside of the Spanish Empire. Papers may explore topics including, but not limited to: artistic patronage by agents of the Spanish Empire or expatriate communities; the circulation of objects through diplomatic, commercial, or artistic networks; artistic collaboration and education; or the movement of artists between the Iberian and Italian peninsulas.


Please send a brief abstract (no more than 150 words); keywords for your talk (maximum of 8); and a brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum in outline rather than narrative form) to Emily Monty (emily_monty@brown.edu) and Emily Wood (emily.wood@u.northwestern.edu) by July 27, 2018 (updated submission deadline)

Tags:  architecture  art  circulation  diplomacy  exchange  Florence  Genoa  Habsburg  Italy  Mantua  mobility  Rome  Spain  Venice 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Society for Early Modern Women: Call for Panels

Posted By Molly Bourne, Friday, April 27, 2018

The Society for the Study of Early Modern Women (http://ssemw.org) will sponsor up to four panels at the 2019 annual conference of the Renaissance Society of America (RSA), to be held in Toronto, 17-19 March 2019. I am soliciting proposals for pre-formed panels in any discipline that explore women and their contributions to the cultural, political, economic, or social spheres of the early modern period. Proposals that include young/emerging scholars are especially welcome. 

 

Sponsorship of a panel by the SSEMW signifies that the panel is pre-approved and automatically accepted for presentation at the RSA annual meeting.

 

Proposals for a pre-formed panel (or linked panels) should be sent to Molly Bourne (mhbourne@syr.edu), SSEMW associate organization representative for RSA, by no later than Wednesday 1 August 2018 with the following materials, assembled into a single Word document (no PDFs please):

 

-        Abstract (max 150 words) describing the panel

 

-        Names of Panel Organizer(s), Chair, Speakers & any respondent(s), including institutional affiliations + email address for each participant

 

-        One-page CV for Organizer(s) & Speakers only; max 300 words each (not in prose) 

 

-        For each paper: title (max 15 words), abstract (max 150 words) & keywords (up to 4)

 

-        Specification of any audio/visual needs

 

Decisions regarding SSEMW panel sponsorship will be sent out at least seven days prior to the regular RSA submission deadline (15 August 2018) for submission of panel or paper proposals.

 

Please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions.

Molly Bourne (mhbourne@syr.edu)

Syracuse University Florence 

Tags:  art  gender  history  literature  material culture  religion  women 

PermalinkComments (0)
 
Membership Software Powered by YourMembership  ::  Legal