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Interdisciplinary and Miscellaneous CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
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This blog is for CfPs for interdisciplinary sessions for RSA 2019 Toronto, as well as those that do not fit into the Art History, History, or Literature discipline categories. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Top tags: literature  art history  interdisciplinary  early modern  material culture  social history  art  book history  cultural history  gender  history  architecture  print culture  religion  circulation  classical reception  global  History of Science  identity  patronage  political history  transcultural  courts  digital humanities  gender studies  history of reading  Humanism  Philosophy  urban spaces  visual arts 

Printing, Reception, Editing, and Teaching Thomas More and Early Humanists

Posted By Emily A. Ransom, Tuesday, July 24, 2018
The Amici Thomae Mori is excited to welcome proposals for papers on Thomas More studies to coincide with the publication of the new Essential Works of Thomas More (Yale University Press, 2019).  This single-volume, accessible, readable edition will be the third major collection of More’s works in nearly five hundred years, after the 1557 Workes published by More’s nephew William Rastell and the Yale Complete Works in fifteen volumes completed in 1997. Though papers on all areas of Thomas More studies will be considered, the Amici is especially interested in topics that will complement this important publication, such as print history of humanist texts, reception history of Thomas More and early humanists, editing humanist texts, and teaching humanist texts in the modern classroom.

To submit a paper, please send your title (15-word max), abstract (150-word max), a few keywords, CV, PhD completion date (past or expected), and affiliation to Emily Ransom (ransome@uwgb.edu) by August 10, 2018.  

Tags:  archives  book history  catholic reform  circulation  classical reception  cultural history  devotion  history  history of reading  history of the book  Humanism  interdisciplinary  literature  pedagogy  philosophy  political history  print culture  publishers  religion  transmission 

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Renaissance Medals

Posted By Tanja L. Jones, Sunday, July 1, 2018
Updated: Sunday, July 1, 2018

As small-scale sculpted objects often allied with but distinct from coins, Renaissance medals circulated widely during the early modern period. In addition to the portraits that traditionally appeared on the obverse of the objects, medals bore a wide range of texts and imagery including original inventions as well as those drawn from allegory, heraldry, or narrative. 

 

All proposals are welcome, but papers which deal with imagery on medals, and the political and social aspects of the creation, collection, and exchange of these objects are particularly encouraged. 

 

Please submit proposals to Arne Flaten [arflaten@bsu.edu] and/or Tanja Jones [tljones@as.ua.edu] by 31 July 2018. 

Tags:  allegory  circulation  heraldry  identity  medals  portraits 

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Re-assessing the Early Modern Court: Connection, Negotiation and Transgression

Posted By Maria Maurer, Wednesday, June 20, 2018

2019 will mark the 50th anniversary of the publication of Norbert Elias’ The Court Society, which placed the early modern court at the center of a long civilizing process wherein the king exercised social control over and imposed emotional restraint upon his courtiers. While his methods and conclusions remain contested, Elias called attention to the role of the court in both early modern and modern society. Since the publication of The Court Society scholarship on the court has proliferated, yet we still tend to treat the court as a closed and controlled system with elaborate means of monitoring behavior and excluding outsiders.

This panel seeks to break open the early modern court by focusing on the court as a point of contact rather than a realm of separation. We welcome papers that examine relationships between courts and courtiers, as well as those that analyze the intermingling of social strata or connections between the court and civic or religious authorities. The panel also seeks to illuminate the ways in which fields such as critical gender, race, and sexuality studies and transnational studies have changed the ways in which we approach the court. What roles did servants and slaves play at court? How did courts function in non-European contexts, and what effects did international trade, diplomacy and colonization have upon court structures?

Given the re-birth of a small, but extremely wealthy and politically influential class in the 21st century, the 2019 meeting of RSA offers us a chance to re-assess our approaches to the early modern court and its continued relevance in our contemporary society.

Paper topics might include, but are not limited to, the following:

- Relationships between or among court centers (European and/or non European)

- Colonial courts and relationships between indigenous rulers and colonizers

- Social climbing or disfavor at court

- Negotiations of courtly strictures; this might include transgressing or stretching rules governing ritual, etiquette, gender, and the use or abuse of court positions, as well as violence, theft or other unsanctioned behaviors

- Laudatory and/or satirical representations of the court and its members

- The roles of servants and/or slaves as social or cultural agents

- Contacts between courts and civic or religious organizations

Please send an abstract of 300 words, paper title and a brief curriculum vitae to Maria Maurer (maria-maurer@utulsa.edu) by 20 July 2018. Selected panelists will be asked to shorten their abstracts and paper titles to conform with RSA guidelines by 10 August 2018.

Tags:  art history  circulation  courts  early modern  gender  global  history  interdisciplinary  literature  mobility  slavery  social history  transcultural 

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Re-assessing the Early Modern Court: Connection, Negotiation and Transgression

Posted By Maria Maurer, Wednesday, June 20, 2018

2019 will mark the 50th anniversary of the publication of Norbert Elias’ The Court Society, which placed the early modern court at the center of a long civilizing process wherein the king exercised social control over and imposed emotional restraint upon his courtiers. While his methods and conclusions remain contested, Elias called attention to the role of the court in both early modern and modern society. Since the publication of The Court Society scholarship on the court has proliferated, yet we still tend to treat the court as a closed and controlled system with elaborate means of monitoring behavior and excluding outsiders.

This panel seeks to break open the early modern court by focusing on the court as a point of contact rather than a realm of separation. We welcome papers that examine relationships between courts and courtiers, as well as those that analyze the intermingling of social strata or connections between the court and civic or religious authorities. The panel also seeks to illuminate the ways in which fields such as critical gender, race, and sexuality studies and transnational studies have changed the ways in which we approach the court. What roles did servants and slaves play at court? How did courts function in non-European contexts, and what effects did international trade, diplomacy and colonization have upon court structures?

Given the re-birth of a small, but extremely wealthy and politically influential class in the 21st century, the 2019 meeting of RSA offers us a chance to re-assess our approaches to the early modern court and its continued relevance in our contemporary society.

Paper topics might include, but are not limited to, the following:

- Relationships between or among court centers (European and/or non European)

- Colonial courts and relationships between indigenous rulers and colonizers

- Social climbing or disfavor at court

- Negotiations of courtly strictures; this might include transgressing or stretching rules governing ritual, etiquette, gender, and the use or abuse of court positions, as well as violence, theft or other unsanctioned behaviors

- Laudatory and/or satirical representations of the court and its members

- The roles of servants and/or slaves as social or cultural agents

- Contacts between courts and civic or religious organizations

Please send an abstract of 300 words, paper title and a brief curriculum vitae to Maria Maurer (maria-maurer@utulsa.edu) by 20 July 2018. Selected panelists will be asked to shorten their abstracts and paper titles to conform with RSA guidelines by 10 August 2018.

Tags:  art history  circulation  courts  early modern  gender  global  history  interdisciplinary  literature  mobility  slavery  social history  transcultural 

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Kircher’s World

Posted By Thomas Beachdel, Friday, June 15, 2018
Updated: Friday, June 15, 2018

Call For Papers

Renaissance Society of America

Annual Conference, March 17-19, 2019, Toronto, Canada

Kircher’s World

This panel invites papers on the work, influence, or problematization of the seventeenth-century polymath, Athanasius Kircher (1602-1680). A category defying figure caught between the encyclopaedism of the Renaissance and the turn toward specialized knowledge, Kircher has not received the attention of his more “scientific” contemporaries, such as Kepler or Newton, and is often regarded as an outside figure, given his penchant for the arcane, the mysterious, and his adherence to the Hermetic tradition, despite the work of Copernicus. At the same time, the vast outpouring of Kircher’s work on a broad range of subjects—Egyptian civilization and hieroglyphs (Oedipus Aegyptiacus), music (Musurgia Universalis), China (China Monumentis), geology (Mundus Subterraneus)—was extremely influential to a wide audience during his lifetime. Of particular interest are papers dealing with Kircher’s Mundus Subterraneus and the influence of this text and his viewpoint on geology, theories of the formation of the earth, and volcanism.

Session Chair: Thomas Beachdel, CUNY, Hostos

Please submit a short (max. 150 word) abstract and CV by July 31, 2018 to: thomas.beachdel@gmail.com

Tags:  art  art history  book history  circulation  cultural history  early modern  History of Science  interdisciplinary  print culture  transcultural  visual arts  visual culturecirculation 

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Beyond Eastern Europe, 1400–1700

Posted By Tomasz Grusiecki, Tuesday, May 22, 2018
Updated: Saturday, July 21, 2018

In the early modern period, eastern Europe was a mosaic of cultures. Multi-ethnic, multi-lingual and multi-denominational, it was situated at the crossroads of trade routes, political affairs, and cultural flows. Yet in the eighteenth century, the region’s perceived distance from the main centers of the Enlightenment led to its subsequent framing as the space of socio-economic backwardness, political disorder and cultural periphery. This binary positioning has had profound consequences on the perceptions of this region to this day.

 

This panel seeks to explore and redress two interconnected problems: (1) the terminology and methodologies that have been applied to conceptually situate the lands between the Baltic and Black Seas—for example, the ‘East’, ‘periphery’, and more recently, ‘borderland’; (2) and, in turn, the different ways in which art, architecture and literature can challenge the conventional definitions of the region.

 

We thus invite scholars of central and eastern Europe to explore new approaches, terms, and questions that address the place of this region in its various complexities and thematic contexts. We seek papers that cover any aspect of culture (art, architecture, material culture, literature) that might shed new light on the region from within, across, and from without.

 

Please send a 150-word abstract and a brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum) to Katie Jakobiec (katie.jakobiec@worc.ox.ac.uk) and Tomasz Grusiecki (tomaszgrusiecki@boisestate.edu) before Monday, 6 August 2018. Presenters will have to be active RSA members.

Tags:  architecture  art  Art History  central Europe  circulation  cultural history  eastern Europe  global  literature  material culture  transcultural  visual culturecirculation 

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Deadline extended - CfP: Art Beyond Spanish Italy, 1500-1700

Posted By Emily B. Wood, Thursday, May 3, 2018
Updated: Saturday, July 21, 2018

Session Sponsored by the Italian Art Society (IAS)

“Your interest in Italy is the main artery by which the pulse of all your power beats…”
(Charles V to Philip II, 1555)

By the end of the sixteenth century, the Spanish crown controlled major regions of the Italian Peninsula, from the Kingdom of Naples to the Duchy of Milan. At the same time, areas outside of Spanish sovereignty, including the Italian Republics, Tuscany, Mantua, and the Papal States, felt the effects of Spain’s “soft” imperialism (Dandelet, 2001) in economic, social, and cultural
spheres. This panel focuses on art-historical approaches that explore the question of Spanish cultural imperialism on the Italian Peninsula outside of the Spanish Empire. Papers may explore topics including, but not limited to: artistic patronage by agents of the Spanish Empire or expatriate communities; the circulation of objects through diplomatic, commercial, or artistic networks; artistic collaboration and education; or the movement of artists between the Iberian and Italian peninsulas.


Please send a brief abstract (no more than 150 words); keywords for your talk (maximum of 8); and a brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum in outline rather than narrative form) to Emily Monty (emily_monty@brown.edu) and Emily Wood (emily.wood@u.northwestern.edu) by July 27, 2018 (updated submission deadline)

Tags:  architecture  art  circulation  diplomacy  exchange  Florence  Genoa  Habsburg  Italy  Mantua  mobility  Rome  Spain  Venice 

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