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Interdisciplinary and Miscellaneous CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
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This blog is for CfPs for interdisciplinary sessions for RSA 2019 Toronto, as well as those that do not fit into the Art History, History, or Literature discipline categories. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Top tags: literature  art history  interdisciplinary  early modern  material culture  social history  art  book history  cultural history  gender  history  architecture  print culture  religion  circulation  classical reception  global  History of Science  identity  patronage  political history  transcultural  courts  digital humanities  gender studies  history of reading  Humanism  Philosophy  urban spaces  visual arts 

Secrecy, Catholicism, and Spycraft in Early Modern England

Posted By Kristin M. Bezio, Friday, July 27, 2018

The Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association is sponsoring a panel on Secrecy, Catholicism, and Spycraft in Early Modern England. We are seeking proposals which address the suppression, persecution, and preservation of Catholicism and Catholic praxis in early modern England following the Henrician Reformation up to 1660. We are interested in cross-disciplinary perspectives, including art and architectural history; literary depictions and works; social and cultural history; Recusant and Jesuit history; and other approaches.

Please send abstracts (150 words or less) and CVs (including expected date of completion for dissertation, if not already completed) to kbezio@richmond.edu by August 10th.

Tags:  Catholicism  cultural history  early modern  England  Literature  reformation  religion  social history  spies 

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RSA panel on ‘Oriental Studies in Europe, 1500–1700’

Posted By Nil Palabiyik, Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Papers are sought for a panel on ‘Oriental Studies in Europe, 1500–1700’ to be submitted to the RSA 2019 (Toronto, 17–21 March).

 

Western Europe saw an unprecedented level of scholarly activity in Arabic, Persian and Turkish in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth century. The engagement with languages of the East came in many different forms including Latin translations and refutations of the Qurʾān; the study of biblical texts in the languages of the Middle East; the study of scientific, literary and philosophical texts; and the printing of the first dictionaries, grammars and phrasebooks of these three languages.

 

The panel will discuss the historical development of Oriental Studies in early modern Europe through manuscript collections and early printed editions of Arabic, Persian and Turkish texts, such as the printed output of the Medici Press in Rome or Thomas Erpenius’s publishing house in Leiden, as well as marginalia and annotations on manuscripts and printed books. 

 

 

The topics are not limited to but may include:

 

– institutionalisation of the teaching of Oriental languages and the founding of chairs for Arabic at universities such as Bologna, Paris and Oxford

– early printed editions in Turkish, Persian and Arabic

– technical issues arising from printing with Arabic type; the availability and sourcing of materials for printing Arabic; the centres for printing with Arabic type; the printers, correctors and typesetters of Arabic type; printing Arabic-, Persian- and Turkish-language books with non-Arabic type

– early Oriental dictionaries, grammars, phrasebooks and their authors

– bible translations into Arabic, Persian and Turkish

– Qurʾānic studies in early modern Europe

– Oriental manuscripts in royal, public, ecclesiastical, university and private early modern libraries; scholarly collections of Oriental books

 

If you would like to join us, please send an e-mail to me, Nil Palabiyik (nil.palabiyik@lmu.de), immediately to register your interest.

I will need:

– a paper title (15-word maximum)

– an abstract (150-word maximum)

– a short CV

– your full name, current affiliation, and email address

 

by 5 August at the latest.

Tags:  Arabic  book history  cultural history  early modern  Hebrew  history  History of Science  Humanism  interdisciplinary  Oriental studies  Orientalism  Ottoman  Persian  Turkish 

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Reappraisals of Renaissance Perspective

Posted By Tawrin Baker, Thursday, July 19, 2018

Fifty years ago, the status of linear perspective was clear: It was a technical achievement that signaled the rationality of sight and paved the way for the scientific revolution. In the succeeding years, scholars have argued for the incoherence of both the perspective (Elkins) and scientific revolution (Shapin) concepts. It is now not so clear how to link the rendering of space in a painting to larger intellectual developments in the sciences, culture or society. At best perspective represents a separate practice. At worse it is merely a fetish of European exceptionalism. 

 

As the postmodern critique of science has weakened and some embrace of it seems politically necessary (e.g. the climate change debate), how would this affect our understanding of linear perspective? This panel seeks to address this question by asking: 

  • What were the varieties of Renaissance perspective, and more broadly what was the larger economy of geometrical knowing?
  • How are applying divisions of theory and practice, or strictly geometric versus logistical concerns, relevant to discerning progressive knowledge? 
  • Does the clarification of artistic intentions help understand the perspectivist’s knowledge (e.g. for Piero della Francesca) 
  • Who actually had the abilities to apply rigorous perspective versus the everyday shortcut uses? 
  • What is at stake, for us right now, in the study of Renaissance perspective?

The panel especially seeks to move beyond entrenched positions - a reactionary scientistic view of perspective or a critical, deflationary view. We are interested in cases where linkages emerge but which demand a new understanding or contextualization of knowledge in the early modern period. 

 

By August 1st, please send an abstract of no more than 150 words, with keywords, and a brief cv to Tawrin Baker (tawrin@sas.upenn.edu) and Ian Verstegen (verstege@sas.upenn.edu). 

Tags:  Art History  early modern  Geometry  History of Science  Humanism  interdisciplinary  Perspective 

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In Search of the Canon: Poets and Artists Confronting with their Models (c. 1500-1700)

Posted By Maria G. Matarazzo, Thursday, July 19, 2018

The theory of Imitation was a central topic of discussion in the ‘Republic of Letters’. The European community of humanists, philosophers, poets and artists was engaged in the dispute over the models to refer to during the creative process. How to develop a normative canon as a reference point for artists and writers in the practice of Imitation? Which poets and artists to select as the examples of ‘bello stile’?

While the authority of ancient models was universally acknowledged, the building of a canon of modern masters was under discussion. One of the typical environments of this discussion were the Academies, where writers, artists, philosophers, antiquarians gathered around learned patrons.

Considering the interdisciplinary nature of this debate, this panel aims to explore the construction of a canon through a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective. The main purpose is not only to study the mechanisms implied in the building of the canon but also to bring out the intersections between Art and Literature concerning this topic.

Questions to be considered include but are not limited to: the institutions where the debate took place, with a particular focus on the Academies; rhetorical devices for debating the canon and the metaphors of Imitation; the circulation of the canon through publishing, printings, new editions and reproductive printmaking; the impact of the canon on the teaching practices.

 

Please submit proposals to Ida Duretto (ida.duretto@sns.it) and Maria Gabriella Matarazzo (mariagabriella.matarazzo@sns.it) by August 12, 2018.

Proposals should include a paper title, an abstract (150-word maximum), keywords and a CV (300-word maximum).

Tags:  academies  Art History  book history  cultural history  early modern  history of reading  history of the book  Imitation  interdisciplinary  literature  mimesis  patronage  philology  Poetry  print culture  publishers  reproductive prints  the canon  visual arts 

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Defining Space: Walls and Cities in the Early Modern World

Posted By Luis J. Gordo Pelaez, Thursday, July 19, 2018

Walls have been an omnipresent feature of human settlements since ancient times. Even today they continue to be apart of our daily life and discourse, whether for politically driven purposes (i.e. US border “security”) or satyr (i.e. the now defunk website, Bricking it for Canada). Whether ancient or contemporary, walls have contributed to defining and redefining spaces, creating a sense of place and identity, demarcating physical boundaries, and imposing socio-economic hierarchies of inclusion and exclusion. In the context of early modern cities, walls experienced a resurgence as a consequence, among others, of expanding empires and colonizing efforts, the development of warfare technology and new systems of fortification, and the implementation of directives regarding the distribution and use of urban space. Whether materialized or not (Richard Kagan has examined their absence in inland colonial Spanish America), walls were a common occurrence in the schemes of early modern urban theorists and planners, and a frequent instrument of discussion in the political and socio-economic plans of absolute regimes, particularly in foreign dominions. For better or worse, walls have maintained their relevance. Framed by contemporary understandings of walls, this session aims to examine the relationship between cities and walls during the early modern era from a global comparative perspective. Papers that interrogate this interplay in any of its manifestations (conceptualization and building, notions of agency and perception associated with these infrastructures, the dichotomy inside/outside, narrative and graphic representation, and materiality) during the period 1300-1700 are particularly welcome to this comparative panel. 

 

Please send paper titles (15-word max.); abstracts (150-word max.); brief CVs; PhD competition date (past or expected); full name, current affiliation, and e-mail address to organizers (Cody Barteet, cbarteet@uwo.ca; and Luis Gordo-Peláez, luisgordopelaez@csufresno.edu) by August 8, 2018. Submission guidelines are available at https://www.rsa.org/page/2019SubmissionsGuide .

Tags:  architecture  art  art history  city  cultural history  early modern  history  identity  literature  material culture  representation  seventeenth century  sixteenth century  social history  urban spaces  urban studies  urbanism  walls 

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Health in Medicine and Visual Arts, 1300-1550

Posted By Jordan J. Famularo, Friday, July 13, 2018

CFP: Health in Medicine and Visual Arts, 1300-1550

Artists and architects contributed to cultures of health in medieval and early modern societies, yet their ties to medical practice are often overlooked in modern scholarship. This session invites historians across disciplines to compare their approaches to visual cultures of medicine between 1300 and 1550. Which perspectives and methods might be productively shared among historians of medicine, science, art, architecture, and other specialties focused on care for the body, mind, and soul? A key objective is to advance research on interactions between learned medicine (i.e., taught in universities) and visual arts.

Papers are invited to address the body of knowledge by which artifacts and monuments were believed to be therapeutic and/or protective. How and why were such effects ascribed to images, objects, and spaces?

Topics might include

- images in medical astrology: instructions for their making and use

- restorative spaces in domestic and institutional buildings

- therapeutic works on paper: books, almanacs, calendars, prints

- apothecaries and foreign ingredients in the service of medicine and pigment-making

- objects and environments used in regimens for preserving health and hygiene

Intercultural, interregional, and transoceanic topics are welcome.

Paper proposals are due by August 5, 2018 to Jordan Famularo, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University (jjf376@nyu.edu). Proposals should include two documents: an abstract with paper title (250 words maximum) and CV. Please indicate the presenter’s title and affiliation.

Submissions are considered commitments to attend the conference and to be responsible for registration and membership fees.

Tags:  architecture  art history  early modern  History of Medicine  History of Science  interdisciplinary  medieval  visual culture 

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Re-assessing the Early Modern Court: Connection, Negotiation and Transgression

Posted By Maria Maurer, Wednesday, June 20, 2018

2019 will mark the 50th anniversary of the publication of Norbert Elias’ The Court Society, which placed the early modern court at the center of a long civilizing process wherein the king exercised social control over and imposed emotional restraint upon his courtiers. While his methods and conclusions remain contested, Elias called attention to the role of the court in both early modern and modern society. Since the publication of The Court Society scholarship on the court has proliferated, yet we still tend to treat the court as a closed and controlled system with elaborate means of monitoring behavior and excluding outsiders.

This panel seeks to break open the early modern court by focusing on the court as a point of contact rather than a realm of separation. We welcome papers that examine relationships between courts and courtiers, as well as those that analyze the intermingling of social strata or connections between the court and civic or religious authorities. The panel also seeks to illuminate the ways in which fields such as critical gender, race, and sexuality studies and transnational studies have changed the ways in which we approach the court. What roles did servants and slaves play at court? How did courts function in non-European contexts, and what effects did international trade, diplomacy and colonization have upon court structures?

Given the re-birth of a small, but extremely wealthy and politically influential class in the 21st century, the 2019 meeting of RSA offers us a chance to re-assess our approaches to the early modern court and its continued relevance in our contemporary society.

Paper topics might include, but are not limited to, the following:

- Relationships between or among court centers (European and/or non European)

- Colonial courts and relationships between indigenous rulers and colonizers

- Social climbing or disfavor at court

- Negotiations of courtly strictures; this might include transgressing or stretching rules governing ritual, etiquette, gender, and the use or abuse of court positions, as well as violence, theft or other unsanctioned behaviors

- Laudatory and/or satirical representations of the court and its members

- The roles of servants and/or slaves as social or cultural agents

- Contacts between courts and civic or religious organizations

Please send an abstract of 300 words, paper title and a brief curriculum vitae to Maria Maurer (maria-maurer@utulsa.edu) by 20 July 2018. Selected panelists will be asked to shorten their abstracts and paper titles to conform with RSA guidelines by 10 August 2018.

Tags:  art history  circulation  courts  early modern  gender  global  history  interdisciplinary  literature  mobility  slavery  social history  transcultural 

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Re-assessing the Early Modern Court: Connection, Negotiation and Transgression

Posted By Maria Maurer, Wednesday, June 20, 2018

2019 will mark the 50th anniversary of the publication of Norbert Elias’ The Court Society, which placed the early modern court at the center of a long civilizing process wherein the king exercised social control over and imposed emotional restraint upon his courtiers. While his methods and conclusions remain contested, Elias called attention to the role of the court in both early modern and modern society. Since the publication of The Court Society scholarship on the court has proliferated, yet we still tend to treat the court as a closed and controlled system with elaborate means of monitoring behavior and excluding outsiders.

This panel seeks to break open the early modern court by focusing on the court as a point of contact rather than a realm of separation. We welcome papers that examine relationships between courts and courtiers, as well as those that analyze the intermingling of social strata or connections between the court and civic or religious authorities. The panel also seeks to illuminate the ways in which fields such as critical gender, race, and sexuality studies and transnational studies have changed the ways in which we approach the court. What roles did servants and slaves play at court? How did courts function in non-European contexts, and what effects did international trade, diplomacy and colonization have upon court structures?

Given the re-birth of a small, but extremely wealthy and politically influential class in the 21st century, the 2019 meeting of RSA offers us a chance to re-assess our approaches to the early modern court and its continued relevance in our contemporary society.

Paper topics might include, but are not limited to, the following:

- Relationships between or among court centers (European and/or non European)

- Colonial courts and relationships between indigenous rulers and colonizers

- Social climbing or disfavor at court

- Negotiations of courtly strictures; this might include transgressing or stretching rules governing ritual, etiquette, gender, and the use or abuse of court positions, as well as violence, theft or other unsanctioned behaviors

- Laudatory and/or satirical representations of the court and its members

- The roles of servants and/or slaves as social or cultural agents

- Contacts between courts and civic or religious organizations

Please send an abstract of 300 words, paper title and a brief curriculum vitae to Maria Maurer (maria-maurer@utulsa.edu) by 20 July 2018. Selected panelists will be asked to shorten their abstracts and paper titles to conform with RSA guidelines by 10 August 2018.

Tags:  art history  circulation  courts  early modern  gender  global  history  interdisciplinary  literature  mobility  slavery  social history  transcultural 

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Kircher’s World

Posted By Thomas Beachdel, Friday, June 15, 2018
Updated: Friday, June 15, 2018

Call For Papers

Renaissance Society of America

Annual Conference, March 17-19, 2019, Toronto, Canada

Kircher’s World

This panel invites papers on the work, influence, or problematization of the seventeenth-century polymath, Athanasius Kircher (1602-1680). A category defying figure caught between the encyclopaedism of the Renaissance and the turn toward specialized knowledge, Kircher has not received the attention of his more “scientific” contemporaries, such as Kepler or Newton, and is often regarded as an outside figure, given his penchant for the arcane, the mysterious, and his adherence to the Hermetic tradition, despite the work of Copernicus. At the same time, the vast outpouring of Kircher’s work on a broad range of subjects—Egyptian civilization and hieroglyphs (Oedipus Aegyptiacus), music (Musurgia Universalis), China (China Monumentis), geology (Mundus Subterraneus)—was extremely influential to a wide audience during his lifetime. Of particular interest are papers dealing with Kircher’s Mundus Subterraneus and the influence of this text and his viewpoint on geology, theories of the formation of the earth, and volcanism.

Session Chair: Thomas Beachdel, CUNY, Hostos

Please submit a short (max. 150 word) abstract and CV by July 31, 2018 to: thomas.beachdel@gmail.com

Tags:  art  art history  book history  circulation  cultural history  early modern  History of Science  interdisciplinary  print culture  transcultural  visual arts  visual culturecirculation 

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Character beyond Shakespeare

Posted By Harry Newman, Thursday, June 7, 2018

Despite the rise of new character criticism and other important movements (e.g. new materialism, the history of emotions, digital humanities), early modern scholarship on character remains dominated by Shakespeare’s plays and their dramatis personae. “Non-Shakespearean” character and characterization tend to be judged according to “Shakespearean” models of “interiority”, “individuation” and “depth”. Narratives of the historical development of character continue to focus on ground broken by Shakespeare, especially at the turn of the seventeenth century, with plays such as Julius Caesar and Hamlet still reigning supreme as game-changers.

This panel invites papers that investigate non-Shakespearean models and paradigms of character in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England, whether in dramatic, non-dramatic or non-literary contexts. Papers might consider the following:

·         What are the significance of characterization techniques developed by playwrights such as Thomas Kyd, John Marston, Francis Beaumont, John Fletcher, Thomas Heywood, Thomas Middleton and Philip Massinger?
·         How does character work in non-dramatic genres such poetry, historiography and life-writing? How were notions of fictional persons shaped—for example—by the rise of English prose fiction from the 1560s, the vogue for sonnets and epigrams in the 1590s, and the popularity of “character” books from the 1610s?
·         Do neglected or derided types of character need to be (re)assessed, such as allegorical characters, bit parts or “extras”, animal characters, humoral personalities, and co-authored characters?
·         What is the importance of authors who write across genres such as George Gascoigne, Robert Greene, John Lyly, Thomas Dekker, Thomas Nashe and John Webster, female authors such as Isabella Whitney, Mary Wroth, Aemilia Lanyer, Mary Sidney, Anne Clifford and Margaret Cavendish, or non-authorial agents of character-creation such as stationers, scribes, patrons, actors, audiences and readers?
·         What are the roles of character and impersonation in “non-literary” texts, such as sermons, medical manuals and conduct books, or even “non-textual” forms in material and visual culture (e.g. paintings, architecture, emblems, jewellery, gaming cards & tokens)?
·         How does the lexicon of character and characterization (e.g. charactery, personation, passionating, inwardness) develop outside the Shakespeare canon?
·         How are digital media creating new access to and new forms of interaction with early modern characters beyond the Shakespeare canon?


Papers may discuss Shakespearean drama, but must do so in relation to other early modern authors, genres or forms. Non-traditional and experimental approaches are encouraged, as are alternative historical narratives that challenge Shakespeare’s place at the epicentre of early modern character criticism. Proposals are welcome from scholars working in any discipline.

Please submit your paper proposal by 15th July 2018 to Harry Newman at harry.newman@rhul.ac.uk. The proposal should include:

·         Name, affiliation and email address
·         Paper title (15 words max)
·         Abstract (150 words max)
·         Keywords
·         Curriculum vitae (300 words max)

Tags:  book history  character  digital humanities  drama  early modern  literature  material culture  Shakespeare  the canon  the non-Shakespearean 

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