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Interdisciplinary and Miscellaneous CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
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This blog is for CfPs for interdisciplinary sessions for RSA 2019 Toronto, as well as those that do not fit into the Art History, History, or Literature discipline categories. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Top tags: literature  art history  interdisciplinary  early modern  material culture  social history  art  book history  cultural history  gender  history  architecture  print culture  religion  circulation  classical reception  global  History of Science  identity  patronage  political history  transcultural  courts  digital humanities  gender studies  history of reading  Humanism  Philosophy  urban spaces  visual arts 

Wonder Women: Amazons in the Early Modern European Imagination

Posted By Victoria G. Fanti, Thursday, July 26, 2018
Updated: Thursday, July 26, 2018

Session chair: Gerry Milligan, CUNY

The blockbuster success of the 2017 film Wonder Woman reignited a global interest in the figure of the Amazon, eliciting celebrations of female strength and independence alongside debates about her exoticism and sexualization. A sequel, already highly anticipated by many, is slated for release in late 2019.

Such a widespread interest in the Amazonian warrior-woman—both her allure and her paradox—is not, however, a new phenomenon; the Amazons likewise captured the popular and elite imagination of the Early Modern period, featuring in literary productions across Europe. Building on scholarship by Frédérique Verrier, Kathryn Schwarz, Sarah Colvin and Helen Watanabe-O’Kelly, Eleonora Stoppino, and Gerry Milligan (among many others), this panel seeks to put Early Modern representations of Amazons into dialogue with one another, across linguistic traditions and national borders, in order to explore the nuances of how these women were imagined, discussed, and disseminated across Europe.

We welcome papers that explore questions of sexuality, female violence, gender-bending, orientalism, politics, and the like. Texts and themes of interest might include, but are not limited to:        

-       Histories (and “histories”) of the Amazons

-       Literary and poetic imaginations of Amazonian women and/or their descendants, such as in the epic-chivalric tradition or in theater and/or opera

-       Treatises, dialogues, or correspondences that make reference to Amazons in order to engage with the querelle des femmes

-       The Early Modern use of Amazonian lore or symbolism for encomiastic purposes

 

Please send questions and/or abstracts (150 words) with a brief biography, A/V requests, and keywords to Victoria Fanti at vfanti1@jhu.edu by August 3

Tags:  French literature  gender  gender studies  German literature  Iberian Peninsula  interdisciplinary  Italian literature  Literature  Spain  women 

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CFP -- Hagiography Society

Posted By Alison K. Frazier, Friday, July 20, 2018
Updated: Friday, July 20, 2018

HAGIOGRAPHY SOCIETY

Call for Paper, Panel, and Roundtable Proposals

Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting

Toronto 17-19 March 2019

DEADLINE EXTENDED!!!

The HAGIOGRAPHY SOCIETY invites proposals from all academic disciplines for the Toronto 2019 meeting of the Renaissance Society of America. We welcome individual papers, full panels (normally three papers, with a session chair and an optional respondent), and roundtable discussions (normally five-eight presenters).

Any topic that intersects with “sanctity in the Renaissance” is welcome: shrines, liturgies, relics, processions, miracles, laude, legendae, vitae and re-writings, sculptural and frescoed vitae. We welcome innovative approaches to the varied types of sanctity: political saints, family saints, aspiring saints, heretical saints, child saints, pilgrim saints, healing saints, warrior saints. We especially invite papers that examine saints beyond Europe, that explore holy gender beyond the binary, and that take up “Renaissance medievalism” as expressed in hagiographic revisions.

As an Associate Organization of the RSA, HS may field as many as four panels. Sponsorship of a panel by the AAR-SOF normally means that the panel will be accepted by the RSA Program Committee without further vetting, provided the panels comply with the RSA guidelines.

Proposals should include all the information listed in the RSA Submission Guidelines here: http://www.rsa.org/page/2019SubmissionsGuide#proposalcomponents .

Note the restricted length of proposals. Incomplete proposals will not be considered.

Everyone who presents at the annual meeting must be a member of RSA at the time of the meeting: http://www.rsa.org/page/2019SubmissionsGuide#membership .

Proposals should be sent to Alison Frazier (akfrazier@austin.utexas.edu) and Barbara Zimbalist  (bezimbalist@utep.edu) by 5 August 2018.

Anyone whose proposal is not accepted for the HS-RSA panels will be informed in time to submit as an individual. Please note, though, that those submissions will be evaluated by the Program Committee of the RSA.

Tags:  gender  global  hagiography  liturgy  re-writing  saint  sanctity  shrine 

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More Than Merely Passive: Addressing the Early Modern Audience

Posted By John R. Decker, Monday, July 2, 2018
Updated: Monday, July 9, 2018

“… so that the learned may savor the profundity of the allegory while the humble may profit from the lightness of the story” (de modo praedicandi)

 

Early modern audiences were not homogenous. Differences in status, education, language, wealth, and experience (to name only a few) could influence how a group of people, or a particular person, received and made sense of sermons, public proclamations, images, objects, and spaces. The ways in which images, objects, proclamations, etc. were framed and executed could have a serious impact on their relevance and effectiveness. This session seeks papers that investigate the ways in which authors, artists, preachers, theologians, and civic or court officials took account of and encoded pluriform audiences in their works. Topics might consider, but are not limited to, questions such as: What sorts of strategies were employed to take into account multiple ‘levels’ of audience? How well did such strategies work? What were the consequences—possible or actual—when they failed? Please submit an abstract and CV by no later than 30 July, 2018 to: jdecker@pratt.edu.

Tags:  art history  artists  collaboration  cultural history  gender  identity  images  imagination  invention  literature  material culture  patronage  religious communities  representation  social history  urban spaces  urbanism  visual arts  visual communication  visual culture 

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Re-assessing the Early Modern Court: Connection, Negotiation and Transgression

Posted By Maria Maurer, Wednesday, June 20, 2018

2019 will mark the 50th anniversary of the publication of Norbert Elias’ The Court Society, which placed the early modern court at the center of a long civilizing process wherein the king exercised social control over and imposed emotional restraint upon his courtiers. While his methods and conclusions remain contested, Elias called attention to the role of the court in both early modern and modern society. Since the publication of The Court Society scholarship on the court has proliferated, yet we still tend to treat the court as a closed and controlled system with elaborate means of monitoring behavior and excluding outsiders.

This panel seeks to break open the early modern court by focusing on the court as a point of contact rather than a realm of separation. We welcome papers that examine relationships between courts and courtiers, as well as those that analyze the intermingling of social strata or connections between the court and civic or religious authorities. The panel also seeks to illuminate the ways in which fields such as critical gender, race, and sexuality studies and transnational studies have changed the ways in which we approach the court. What roles did servants and slaves play at court? How did courts function in non-European contexts, and what effects did international trade, diplomacy and colonization have upon court structures?

Given the re-birth of a small, but extremely wealthy and politically influential class in the 21st century, the 2019 meeting of RSA offers us a chance to re-assess our approaches to the early modern court and its continued relevance in our contemporary society.

Paper topics might include, but are not limited to, the following:

- Relationships between or among court centers (European and/or non European)

- Colonial courts and relationships between indigenous rulers and colonizers

- Social climbing or disfavor at court

- Negotiations of courtly strictures; this might include transgressing or stretching rules governing ritual, etiquette, gender, and the use or abuse of court positions, as well as violence, theft or other unsanctioned behaviors

- Laudatory and/or satirical representations of the court and its members

- The roles of servants and/or slaves as social or cultural agents

- Contacts between courts and civic or religious organizations

Please send an abstract of 300 words, paper title and a brief curriculum vitae to Maria Maurer (maria-maurer@utulsa.edu) by 20 July 2018. Selected panelists will be asked to shorten their abstracts and paper titles to conform with RSA guidelines by 10 August 2018.

Tags:  art history  circulation  courts  early modern  gender  global  history  interdisciplinary  literature  mobility  slavery  social history  transcultural 

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Re-assessing the Early Modern Court: Connection, Negotiation and Transgression

Posted By Maria Maurer, Wednesday, June 20, 2018

2019 will mark the 50th anniversary of the publication of Norbert Elias’ The Court Society, which placed the early modern court at the center of a long civilizing process wherein the king exercised social control over and imposed emotional restraint upon his courtiers. While his methods and conclusions remain contested, Elias called attention to the role of the court in both early modern and modern society. Since the publication of The Court Society scholarship on the court has proliferated, yet we still tend to treat the court as a closed and controlled system with elaborate means of monitoring behavior and excluding outsiders.

This panel seeks to break open the early modern court by focusing on the court as a point of contact rather than a realm of separation. We welcome papers that examine relationships between courts and courtiers, as well as those that analyze the intermingling of social strata or connections between the court and civic or religious authorities. The panel also seeks to illuminate the ways in which fields such as critical gender, race, and sexuality studies and transnational studies have changed the ways in which we approach the court. What roles did servants and slaves play at court? How did courts function in non-European contexts, and what effects did international trade, diplomacy and colonization have upon court structures?

Given the re-birth of a small, but extremely wealthy and politically influential class in the 21st century, the 2019 meeting of RSA offers us a chance to re-assess our approaches to the early modern court and its continued relevance in our contemporary society.

Paper topics might include, but are not limited to, the following:

- Relationships between or among court centers (European and/or non European)

- Colonial courts and relationships between indigenous rulers and colonizers

- Social climbing or disfavor at court

- Negotiations of courtly strictures; this might include transgressing or stretching rules governing ritual, etiquette, gender, and the use or abuse of court positions, as well as violence, theft or other unsanctioned behaviors

- Laudatory and/or satirical representations of the court and its members

- The roles of servants and/or slaves as social or cultural agents

- Contacts between courts and civic or religious organizations

Please send an abstract of 300 words, paper title and a brief curriculum vitae to Maria Maurer (maria-maurer@utulsa.edu) by 20 July 2018. Selected panelists will be asked to shorten their abstracts and paper titles to conform with RSA guidelines by 10 August 2018.

Tags:  art history  circulation  courts  early modern  gender  global  history  interdisciplinary  literature  mobility  slavery  social history  transcultural 

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Books and Bodies in Early Modern England

Posted By Jillian Linster, Monday, June 4, 2018
Updated: Thursday, July 5, 2018

Organizers: Jillian Linster (University of South Dakota) and Harry Newman (Royal Holloway, University of London)

This panel investigates links between literary and medical culture in early modern England (c. 1500-1700), focusing on the intersections of book history and medical humanities. Scholarship has started to address the physiology of reading, the role of the book trade in disseminating and shaping medical knowledge, and the mutually influential relationship between literary and medical texts. Building on this work, we seek papers focused on the physical and conceptual relationships between books and bodies in early modernity. Papers might consider the following:

·      How did changing technologies, laws, reading habits, and/or the rise of print culture affect the interaction of bodies and books in this period?

·      How did specific books come to represent individual people, and vice versa?

·      How were the bodies of books shaped and reshaped by physical encounters with human bodies (e.g. printers, book binders, readers)?

·      Does the relationship between books and bodies help us to understand power and agency in early modernity?

·      Why is it important to investigate the material lives and textual histories of medical books (anatomical works, midwifery manuals, dietaries, casebooks, herbals, medical receipt books, etc.)?

·      How is the relationship between books and bodies depicted in literary works, artistic renderings, and historical documents from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries?

·      How useful are distinctions between ‘literary’ and ‘medical’ texts when considering the book-body relationship?

·      What was the influence of other cultures (European or non-Western) on English perceptions of books and bodies?

Approaches might include or combine book history, medical humanities, ecocriticism, new materialism, sociological or anthropological theory, social and cultural history, and biblical studies. Non-traditional or experimental lines of inquiry are encouraged. Proposals are welcome from scholars working in any discipline.

Please submit your paper proposal by 15th July 2018, to Jillian Linster and Harry Newman at booksandbodies.panel@gmail.com. The proposal should include the following information in a single document:

·      Name, affiliation and email address

·      Paper title (15 words max)

·      Abstract (150 words max)

·      Keywords

·      One-page CV (300 words max)

Tags:  art history  book history  cultural history  early modern  gender  gender studies  history  interdisciplinary  literature  material culture  networks  print culture  religion 

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Printers, their Social Networks, and the Public Sphere.

Posted By Scott K. Oldenburg, Monday, May 28, 2018

For a proposed panel at RSA 2019 (Toronto, 17 -19 March): I am seeking papers on early modern printers. Our modern sense of publishers as (more often than not) merely profiting from the creative agency of authors obscures the meaningful role early printers had in cultural production, politics (conservative and radical), the reception of major works, and the establishment of a public sphere. Printers sometimes simply sought sales, but they also often specialized and promoted particular agendas. Thomas Berthelet, for instance, printed several texts in support of the humanist education of women; French Protestant printer Thomas Vautrollier teamed up with Arthur Golding to produce Huguenot propaganda; and a few weeks after a stint in Newgate, Gabriel Simson printed Luke Hutton’s The Black Dog of Newgate, a scathing attack on the conditions in that prison. In what ways did individual printers shape the discourse of the period? How did the social network of a printer, or the materials of a particular shop contribute to ideological output? How did female printers (Elizabeth Allde, Jacqueline Vautrollier, Ellen Boyle, and others) influence prevailing ideas of gender or religion? How did specific apprenticeships influence the output of particular shops? In what ways did the Stationers Company and other such organizations facilitate or hinder open discourse? Although the above examples are about English print shops, the call is open to scholars working in other languages and regions as well. Proposals due August 1, 2018.

Send proposals to Scott Oldenburg, soldenbu@tulane.edu

Proposals should include 1) paper title; 2) abstract (150-word max.); 3) short cv (300-word max, not prose); 4) list of five keywords; 5) AV requirements. Note that panelists must register for the conference and arrange for their own travel and lodging. 

Tags:  book history  gender  material culture  microhistory  print culture 

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Material Culture and the Domestic Interior: New Questions, New Approaches

Posted By Maria DePrano, Tuesday, May 22, 2018

While examinations of the Early Modern home flourished in the early twentieth century with works such as Paul Schubring’s on cassoni, the At Home in Renaissance Italy exhibition, which opened at the Victoria and Albert Museum in fall 2006, was a watershed for the examination of material culture. This was followed by the Art and Love in Renaissance Italy exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2008. These exhibitions both responded to a growing interest in material culture and inspired additional studies. Scholars have approached the domestic interior and material culture from diverse directions examining particular rooms, religious communities, types of furnishings, and private homes in major cities. What has been learned in the decade since the groundswell of research around At Home in Renaissance Italy? What avenues remain to be explored? What regions, cities, classes, or ethnic and religious minorities need to be examined? Has gender in the domestic interior been sufficiently considered? Could more work be done on unmarried women and widows? This CFP invites paper proposals from scholars working on the material culture and the domestic interior of Early Modern Europe. Please send title (15-word maximum), abstract (150-word maximum), keywords, and short C.V. to the organizers, Erin J. Campbell (erinjc@uvic.ca) and Maria DePrano (mdeprano@ucmerced.edu) by August 1, 2018.

Tags:  class  domestic interior  furnishings  gender  home  material culture  palaces  religious communities 

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Margaret Cavendish Society Sponsored Sessions CFP

Posted By Lara A. Dodds, Wednesday, May 16, 2018

The Margaret Cavendish Society will sponsor one or more panel sessions at the Renaissance Society of America annual Meeting in Toronto (March 17-19, 2019). We invite proposals for presentations on any topic related to the works of Margaret Cavendish.  Please submit abstracts (150 words maximum) and a brief CV (300 words maximum) to Lara Dodds (ldodds@english.msstate.edu) and James Fitzmaurice (j.fitzmaurice@sheffield.ac.uk)

 by August 1, 2018.

Tags:  Cavendish  gender  gender studies  history  History of Science  Literature  women 

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Society for Early Modern Women: Call for Panels

Posted By Molly Bourne, Friday, April 27, 2018

The Society for the Study of Early Modern Women (http://ssemw.org) will sponsor up to four panels at the 2019 annual conference of the Renaissance Society of America (RSA), to be held in Toronto, 17-19 March 2019. I am soliciting proposals for pre-formed panels in any discipline that explore women and their contributions to the cultural, political, economic, or social spheres of the early modern period. Proposals that include young/emerging scholars are especially welcome. 

 

Sponsorship of a panel by the SSEMW signifies that the panel is pre-approved and automatically accepted for presentation at the RSA annual meeting.

 

Proposals for a pre-formed panel (or linked panels) should be sent to Molly Bourne (mhbourne@syr.edu), SSEMW associate organization representative for RSA, by no later than Wednesday 1 August 2018 with the following materials, assembled into a single Word document (no PDFs please):

 

-        Abstract (max 150 words) describing the panel

 

-        Names of Panel Organizer(s), Chair, Speakers & any respondent(s), including institutional affiliations + email address for each participant

 

-        One-page CV for Organizer(s) & Speakers only; max 300 words each (not in prose) 

 

-        For each paper: title (max 15 words), abstract (max 150 words) & keywords (up to 4)

 

-        Specification of any audio/visual needs

 

Decisions regarding SSEMW panel sponsorship will be sent out at least seven days prior to the regular RSA submission deadline (15 August 2018) for submission of panel or paper proposals.

 

Please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions.

Molly Bourne (mhbourne@syr.edu)

Syracuse University Florence 

Tags:  art  gender  history  literature  material culture  religion  women 

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