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Interdisciplinary and Miscellaneous CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
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This blog is for CfPs for interdisciplinary sessions for RSA 2019 Toronto, as well as those that do not fit into the Art History, History, or Literature discipline categories. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Top tags: literature  art history  interdisciplinary  early modern  material culture  social history  art  book history  cultural history  gender  history  architecture  print culture  religion  circulation  classical reception  global  History of Science  identity  patronage  political history  transcultural  courts  digital humanities  gender studies  history of reading  Humanism  Philosophy  urban spaces  visual arts 

Wonder Women: Amazons in the Early Modern European Imagination

Posted By Victoria G. Fanti, Thursday, July 26, 2018
Updated: Thursday, July 26, 2018

Session chair: Gerry Milligan, CUNY

The blockbuster success of the 2017 film Wonder Woman reignited a global interest in the figure of the Amazon, eliciting celebrations of female strength and independence alongside debates about her exoticism and sexualization. A sequel, already highly anticipated by many, is slated for release in late 2019.

Such a widespread interest in the Amazonian warrior-woman—both her allure and her paradox—is not, however, a new phenomenon; the Amazons likewise captured the popular and elite imagination of the Early Modern period, featuring in literary productions across Europe. Building on scholarship by Frédérique Verrier, Kathryn Schwarz, Sarah Colvin and Helen Watanabe-O’Kelly, Eleonora Stoppino, and Gerry Milligan (among many others), this panel seeks to put Early Modern representations of Amazons into dialogue with one another, across linguistic traditions and national borders, in order to explore the nuances of how these women were imagined, discussed, and disseminated across Europe.

We welcome papers that explore questions of sexuality, female violence, gender-bending, orientalism, politics, and the like. Texts and themes of interest might include, but are not limited to:        

-       Histories (and “histories”) of the Amazons

-       Literary and poetic imaginations of Amazonian women and/or their descendants, such as in the epic-chivalric tradition or in theater and/or opera

-       Treatises, dialogues, or correspondences that make reference to Amazons in order to engage with the querelle des femmes

-       The Early Modern use of Amazonian lore or symbolism for encomiastic purposes

 

Please send questions and/or abstracts (150 words) with a brief biography, A/V requests, and keywords to Victoria Fanti at vfanti1@jhu.edu by August 3

Tags:  French literature  gender  gender studies  German literature  Iberian Peninsula  interdisciplinary  Italian literature  Literature  Spain  women 

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Violence and Trauma in the Early Modern World

Posted By Colin S. Rose, Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Call for Papers for RSA 2019: Violence and Trauma in the Early Modern World

 

Recent historiography has stressed the centrality of violence to early modern history. Interpersonal violence, state violence and military violence have all come under scrutiny for the ways that violence shaped lived experiences and disrupted civil society. This panel seeks to expand on this growing school of thought by asking: how did the trauma wrought by violence and crisis change people’s perspectives on the world around them? Were people inured to its impact, were they fascinated by the danger in their streets, were they deeply troubled by the instability of the world around them? This is an interdisciplinary call for proposals for papers for RSA 2019 Toronto dealing with any aspect of violence and trauma in the early modern world. Papers may address history, literature, art, philosophy or any combination of disciplines present at the RSA in order to build a productive interdisciplinary conversation.

 

Please send:

  • paper title (15-word maximum)
  • abstract (150-word maximum)
  • curriculum vitae (.pdf or .doc upload)
  • PhD completion date (past or expected)
  • full name, current affiliation, and email address

 

to Colin Rose (crose@brocku.ca) by AUGUST 5th 2018

Tags:  interdisciplinary  trauma  violence 

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RSA panel on ‘Oriental Studies in Europe, 1500–1700’

Posted By Nil Palabiyik, Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Papers are sought for a panel on ‘Oriental Studies in Europe, 1500–1700’ to be submitted to the RSA 2019 (Toronto, 17–21 March).

 

Western Europe saw an unprecedented level of scholarly activity in Arabic, Persian and Turkish in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth century. The engagement with languages of the East came in many different forms including Latin translations and refutations of the Qurʾān; the study of biblical texts in the languages of the Middle East; the study of scientific, literary and philosophical texts; and the printing of the first dictionaries, grammars and phrasebooks of these three languages.

 

The panel will discuss the historical development of Oriental Studies in early modern Europe through manuscript collections and early printed editions of Arabic, Persian and Turkish texts, such as the printed output of the Medici Press in Rome or Thomas Erpenius’s publishing house in Leiden, as well as marginalia and annotations on manuscripts and printed books. 

 

 

The topics are not limited to but may include:

 

– institutionalisation of the teaching of Oriental languages and the founding of chairs for Arabic at universities such as Bologna, Paris and Oxford

– early printed editions in Turkish, Persian and Arabic

– technical issues arising from printing with Arabic type; the availability and sourcing of materials for printing Arabic; the centres for printing with Arabic type; the printers, correctors and typesetters of Arabic type; printing Arabic-, Persian- and Turkish-language books with non-Arabic type

– early Oriental dictionaries, grammars, phrasebooks and their authors

– bible translations into Arabic, Persian and Turkish

– Qurʾānic studies in early modern Europe

– Oriental manuscripts in royal, public, ecclesiastical, university and private early modern libraries; scholarly collections of Oriental books

 

If you would like to join us, please send an e-mail to me, Nil Palabiyik (nil.palabiyik@lmu.de), immediately to register your interest.

I will need:

– a paper title (15-word maximum)

– an abstract (150-word maximum)

– a short CV

– your full name, current affiliation, and email address

 

by 5 August at the latest.

Tags:  Arabic  book history  cultural history  early modern  Hebrew  history  History of Science  Humanism  interdisciplinary  Oriental studies  Orientalism  Ottoman  Persian  Turkish 

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Printing, Reception, Editing, and Teaching Thomas More and Early Humanists

Posted By Emily A. Ransom, Tuesday, July 24, 2018
The Amici Thomae Mori is excited to welcome proposals for papers on Thomas More studies to coincide with the publication of the new Essential Works of Thomas More (Yale University Press, 2019).  This single-volume, accessible, readable edition will be the third major collection of More’s works in nearly five hundred years, after the 1557 Workes published by More’s nephew William Rastell and the Yale Complete Works in fifteen volumes completed in 1997. Though papers on all areas of Thomas More studies will be considered, the Amici is especially interested in topics that will complement this important publication, such as print history of humanist texts, reception history of Thomas More and early humanists, editing humanist texts, and teaching humanist texts in the modern classroom.

To submit a paper, please send your title (15-word max), abstract (150-word max), a few keywords, CV, PhD completion date (past or expected), and affiliation to Emily Ransom (ransome@uwgb.edu) by August 10, 2018.  

Tags:  archives  book history  catholic reform  circulation  classical reception  cultural history  devotion  history  history of reading  history of the book  Humanism  interdisciplinary  literature  pedagogy  philosophy  political history  print culture  publishers  religion  transmission 

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Reappraisals of Renaissance Perspective

Posted By Tawrin Baker, Thursday, July 19, 2018

Fifty years ago, the status of linear perspective was clear: It was a technical achievement that signaled the rationality of sight and paved the way for the scientific revolution. In the succeeding years, scholars have argued for the incoherence of both the perspective (Elkins) and scientific revolution (Shapin) concepts. It is now not so clear how to link the rendering of space in a painting to larger intellectual developments in the sciences, culture or society. At best perspective represents a separate practice. At worse it is merely a fetish of European exceptionalism. 

 

As the postmodern critique of science has weakened and some embrace of it seems politically necessary (e.g. the climate change debate), how would this affect our understanding of linear perspective? This panel seeks to address this question by asking: 

  • What were the varieties of Renaissance perspective, and more broadly what was the larger economy of geometrical knowing?
  • How are applying divisions of theory and practice, or strictly geometric versus logistical concerns, relevant to discerning progressive knowledge? 
  • Does the clarification of artistic intentions help understand the perspectivist’s knowledge (e.g. for Piero della Francesca) 
  • Who actually had the abilities to apply rigorous perspective versus the everyday shortcut uses? 
  • What is at stake, for us right now, in the study of Renaissance perspective?

The panel especially seeks to move beyond entrenched positions - a reactionary scientistic view of perspective or a critical, deflationary view. We are interested in cases where linkages emerge but which demand a new understanding or contextualization of knowledge in the early modern period. 

 

By August 1st, please send an abstract of no more than 150 words, with keywords, and a brief cv to Tawrin Baker (tawrin@sas.upenn.edu) and Ian Verstegen (verstege@sas.upenn.edu). 

Tags:  Art History  early modern  Geometry  History of Science  Humanism  interdisciplinary  Perspective 

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In Search of the Canon: Poets and Artists Confronting with their Models (c. 1500-1700)

Posted By Maria G. Matarazzo, Thursday, July 19, 2018

The theory of Imitation was a central topic of discussion in the ‘Republic of Letters’. The European community of humanists, philosophers, poets and artists was engaged in the dispute over the models to refer to during the creative process. How to develop a normative canon as a reference point for artists and writers in the practice of Imitation? Which poets and artists to select as the examples of ‘bello stile’?

While the authority of ancient models was universally acknowledged, the building of a canon of modern masters was under discussion. One of the typical environments of this discussion were the Academies, where writers, artists, philosophers, antiquarians gathered around learned patrons.

Considering the interdisciplinary nature of this debate, this panel aims to explore the construction of a canon through a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective. The main purpose is not only to study the mechanisms implied in the building of the canon but also to bring out the intersections between Art and Literature concerning this topic.

Questions to be considered include but are not limited to: the institutions where the debate took place, with a particular focus on the Academies; rhetorical devices for debating the canon and the metaphors of Imitation; the circulation of the canon through publishing, printings, new editions and reproductive printmaking; the impact of the canon on the teaching practices.

 

Please submit proposals to Ida Duretto (ida.duretto@sns.it) and Maria Gabriella Matarazzo (mariagabriella.matarazzo@sns.it) by August 12, 2018.

Proposals should include a paper title, an abstract (150-word maximum), keywords and a CV (300-word maximum).

Tags:  academies  Art History  book history  cultural history  early modern  history of reading  history of the book  Imitation  interdisciplinary  literature  mimesis  patronage  philology  Poetry  print culture  publishers  reproductive prints  the canon  visual arts 

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Renaissance Vegetarianism - Deadline Extended

Posted By Andrea Crow, Monday, July 16, 2018

The study of early modern food has blossomed in recent years. As scholars have parsed the politics of changing dining practices, the role of recipes in intellectual history, and the growing perception of food ethics as inextricable from social identity, dietary beliefs and habits have begun to be seen as central to early modern studies. One of the most striking dietary trends that spread across Europe in this period, however, remains underexamined: the rise of vegetarianism.


This panel invites papers from across disciplines that examine Renaissance vegetarianism in order to think through the intertwining religious, economic, political, and ethical motives that spurred this transnational movement forward. Possible topics might include views on vegetarianism in the early modern dietary sciences, radical vegetarian leaders and the communities that they organized, vegetarian cuisine and recipe books, the revival of Classical vegetarian thought, or the representation of vegetarianism in literature and the arts.


Proposals should include the presenter’s name, academic affiliation, email address, paper title (15 words maximum), abstract (150 words maximum), and CV (300 words maximum). Please submit proposals by August 1st to Andrea Crow (andrea.crow@bc.edu).

Tags:  art history  ethics  food studies  interdisciplinary  literature  political history  recipe books  vegetarianism 

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Health in Medicine and Visual Arts, 1300-1550

Posted By Jordan J. Famularo, Friday, July 13, 2018

CFP: Health in Medicine and Visual Arts, 1300-1550

Artists and architects contributed to cultures of health in medieval and early modern societies, yet their ties to medical practice are often overlooked in modern scholarship. This session invites historians across disciplines to compare their approaches to visual cultures of medicine between 1300 and 1550. Which perspectives and methods might be productively shared among historians of medicine, science, art, architecture, and other specialties focused on care for the body, mind, and soul? A key objective is to advance research on interactions between learned medicine (i.e., taught in universities) and visual arts.

Papers are invited to address the body of knowledge by which artifacts and monuments were believed to be therapeutic and/or protective. How and why were such effects ascribed to images, objects, and spaces?

Topics might include

- images in medical astrology: instructions for their making and use

- restorative spaces in domestic and institutional buildings

- therapeutic works on paper: books, almanacs, calendars, prints

- apothecaries and foreign ingredients in the service of medicine and pigment-making

- objects and environments used in regimens for preserving health and hygiene

Intercultural, interregional, and transoceanic topics are welcome.

Paper proposals are due by August 5, 2018 to Jordan Famularo, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University (jjf376@nyu.edu). Proposals should include two documents: an abstract with paper title (250 words maximum) and CV. Please indicate the presenter’s title and affiliation.

Submissions are considered commitments to attend the conference and to be responsible for registration and membership fees.

Tags:  architecture  art history  early modern  History of Medicine  History of Science  interdisciplinary  medieval  visual culture 

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Renaissance Philosophy

Posted By David A. Lines, Friday, July 13, 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS: Renaissance Philosophy

(Deadline: 25 July 2018)

 

Papers and/or panels on Renaissance Philosophy are invited for the 65thAnnual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America (17-19 March 2019) in Toronto, Canada. Although papers on all aspects of Renaissance philosophy and thought will be considered, preference will be given to those focusing on one or more of the following topics:

-ethics and politics (in particular, how the ties between these two areas shift during the period in question)

-philosophy across languages (including the rise of philosophy in the vernacular; the relationship of vernacular philosophy to that produced in other vernaculars or in Hebrew, Arabic, Greek, Latin; issues of “translation” in philosophy)

-philosophy and literature

-Aristotelianism and anti-Aristotelianism (including the Plato–Aristotle controversy)

-intersections between philosophy and history of the book 

 

We aim for a good chronological and geographical spread where possible and appropriate.

Proposals for papers should include:

-      the presenter’s name, academic affiliation, email address

-      the paper title (up to 15 words)

-      a paper abstract (up to 150 words)

-      a tabular academic CV (up to 300 words; indicate date of PhD)

-      up to four keywords

-      specification of any AV or computer projection needs. 

Proposals for panels should include:

-      a panel title (up to 15 words) and panel keywords

-      a panel abstract (no longer than 150 words)

-      specification of panel chair (and respondent, if foreseen), along with affiliation and email address

-      a one-page CV for each organizer andparticipant in tabular format (max. 300 words each; indicate date of PhD)

-      for each paper: as above (“papers”)

-      specification of any AV or computer projection needs

 

Please submit your proposal as a single Word document to Professor David Lines (discipline representative for Philosophy) at d.a.lines@warwick.ac.uk by25 July2018. Decisions will be communicated by the end of July.

Tags:  Arabic  book history  ethics  Greek  Hebrew  interdisciplinary  Latin  literature  philosophy  politics  translation  vernacular 

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Re-assessing the Early Modern Court: Connection, Negotiation and Transgression

Posted By Maria Maurer, Wednesday, June 20, 2018

2019 will mark the 50th anniversary of the publication of Norbert Elias’ The Court Society, which placed the early modern court at the center of a long civilizing process wherein the king exercised social control over and imposed emotional restraint upon his courtiers. While his methods and conclusions remain contested, Elias called attention to the role of the court in both early modern and modern society. Since the publication of The Court Society scholarship on the court has proliferated, yet we still tend to treat the court as a closed and controlled system with elaborate means of monitoring behavior and excluding outsiders.

This panel seeks to break open the early modern court by focusing on the court as a point of contact rather than a realm of separation. We welcome papers that examine relationships between courts and courtiers, as well as those that analyze the intermingling of social strata or connections between the court and civic or religious authorities. The panel also seeks to illuminate the ways in which fields such as critical gender, race, and sexuality studies and transnational studies have changed the ways in which we approach the court. What roles did servants and slaves play at court? How did courts function in non-European contexts, and what effects did international trade, diplomacy and colonization have upon court structures?

Given the re-birth of a small, but extremely wealthy and politically influential class in the 21st century, the 2019 meeting of RSA offers us a chance to re-assess our approaches to the early modern court and its continued relevance in our contemporary society.

Paper topics might include, but are not limited to, the following:

- Relationships between or among court centers (European and/or non European)

- Colonial courts and relationships between indigenous rulers and colonizers

- Social climbing or disfavor at court

- Negotiations of courtly strictures; this might include transgressing or stretching rules governing ritual, etiquette, gender, and the use or abuse of court positions, as well as violence, theft or other unsanctioned behaviors

- Laudatory and/or satirical representations of the court and its members

- The roles of servants and/or slaves as social or cultural agents

- Contacts between courts and civic or religious organizations

Please send an abstract of 300 words, paper title and a brief curriculum vitae to Maria Maurer (maria-maurer@utulsa.edu) by 20 July 2018. Selected panelists will be asked to shorten their abstracts and paper titles to conform with RSA guidelines by 10 August 2018.

Tags:  art history  circulation  courts  early modern  gender  global  history  interdisciplinary  literature  mobility  slavery  social history  transcultural 

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