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Interdisciplinary and Miscellaneous CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
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This blog is for CfPs for interdisciplinary sessions for RSA 2019 Toronto, as well as those that do not fit into the Art History, History, or Literature discipline categories. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Top tags: literature  art history  interdisciplinary  early modern  material culture  social history  art  book history  cultural history  gender  history  architecture  print culture  religion  circulation  classical reception  global  History of Science  identity  patronage  political history  transcultural  courts  digital humanities  gender studies  history of reading  Humanism  Philosophy  urban spaces  visual arts 

Representations and Reality of The Early Modern English Marketplace

Posted By Kristin M. Bezio, Friday, July 27, 2018

The Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association is sponsoring a panel on Representations and Reality of The Early Modern English Marketplace. We are seeking paper proposals from any/all disciplines which discuss depictions, realities, and/or materialities of markets and marketplaces, including literary, artistic, musical, or historical contexts.

Please send abstracts (150 words or less) and CVs (including expected date of completion for dissertation, if not already completed) to kbezio@richmond.edu by August 10th.

Tags:  Art History  cultural history  Literature  markets  material culture  social history 

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Defining Space: Walls and Cities in the Early Modern World

Posted By Luis J. Gordo Pelaez, Thursday, July 19, 2018

Walls have been an omnipresent feature of human settlements since ancient times. Even today they continue to be apart of our daily life and discourse, whether for politically driven purposes (i.e. US border “security”) or satyr (i.e. the now defunk website, Bricking it for Canada). Whether ancient or contemporary, walls have contributed to defining and redefining spaces, creating a sense of place and identity, demarcating physical boundaries, and imposing socio-economic hierarchies of inclusion and exclusion. In the context of early modern cities, walls experienced a resurgence as a consequence, among others, of expanding empires and colonizing efforts, the development of warfare technology and new systems of fortification, and the implementation of directives regarding the distribution and use of urban space. Whether materialized or not (Richard Kagan has examined their absence in inland colonial Spanish America), walls were a common occurrence in the schemes of early modern urban theorists and planners, and a frequent instrument of discussion in the political and socio-economic plans of absolute regimes, particularly in foreign dominions. For better or worse, walls have maintained their relevance. Framed by contemporary understandings of walls, this session aims to examine the relationship between cities and walls during the early modern era from a global comparative perspective. Papers that interrogate this interplay in any of its manifestations (conceptualization and building, notions of agency and perception associated with these infrastructures, the dichotomy inside/outside, narrative and graphic representation, and materiality) during the period 1300-1700 are particularly welcome to this comparative panel. 

 

Please send paper titles (15-word max.); abstracts (150-word max.); brief CVs; PhD competition date (past or expected); full name, current affiliation, and e-mail address to organizers (Cody Barteet, cbarteet@uwo.ca; and Luis Gordo-Peláez, luisgordopelaez@csufresno.edu) by August 8, 2018. Submission guidelines are available at https://www.rsa.org/page/2019SubmissionsGuide .

Tags:  architecture  art  art history  city  cultural history  early modern  history  identity  literature  material culture  representation  seventeenth century  sixteenth century  social history  urban spaces  urban studies  urbanism  walls 

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Call for Panels: SHARP @ RSA 2019 Deadline 7/30

Posted By Andie Silva, Monday, July 16, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, July 24, 2018

The Society for the History of Authorship, Reading & Publishing (SHARP) will sponsor up to four panels at the Renaissance Society of America’s annual meeting in Toronto, ON on 17-19 March 2019. SHARP @ RSA brings together scholars working on any aspect of the creation, dissemination, and reception of manuscript and print and their digital remediation.

We invite panel submissions that consider English and/or Continental books and manuscripts from 1350 to 1700. Potential topics include print culture, history of the book, authorship, publishing history, ephemera, illustration, publishers’ archives, production, circulation, and reception. Panels addressing digital methodologies for the study of book history are especially welcome. Participants may also submit a roundtable discussion rather than a panel. Individual submissions may be considered if all four panels are not filled.

Please include all abstracts and brief CVs (up to 4 presenters and a chair/respondent) in a single .DOCX or .PDF document. Sessions may be submitted without a chair; should the submission be accepted, a chair will be assigned by the SHARP liaison or the RSA committee.

Completed session submissions should be emailed to Dr. Andie Silva (asilva[at]york.cuny.edu) by July 30, 2018. Panelists will be contacted with a decision before the formal RSA deadline. Updated (7/24) Please note: Accepted presenters will be asked to join SHARP as members (https://sharp.press.jhu.edu/membership/join) if they are not members already. 

Before submitting, please note the following RSA restrictions: All participants must be current members of RSA in order to present. In order to avoid scheduling conflicts, participants may not give more than one paper, be a discussant in more than one roundtable, or be a respondent in more than one session. A participant may chair up to two sessions. The RSA welcomes graduate student speakers who are within one or two years of defending their dissertations. However, all sessions must include at least one speaker who has received the PhD or other terminal degree. Sessions composed entirely of predoctoral speakers and sessions that include precandidates or MA students will not be considered. Predoctoral speakers should present dissertation research, not term papers. Their CVs must include the dissertation title and expected date of completion to make their eligibility clear to the Program Committee.

Tags:  archival research  archives  authorship  book history  history of reading  history of the book  material culture  print culture  printers  publishers  Readers 

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CfP: Beyond the Microcosm: The Impact of Confraternities on the Civic Sphere.

Posted By Samantha J. Hughes-Johnson, Friday, July 13, 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS

(Deadline: 1 August 2018)

 

The Society for Confraternity Studies will sponsor a number of sessions at the 65th Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America (17 - 19 March 2019) in Toronto, Canada. Accordingly, it invites proposals for papers on the following theme:

 

Beyond the Microcosm: The Impact of Confraternities on the Civic Sphere.

 

Since the formation of the Society for Confraternity Studies, which celebrates it 30th anniversary in 2019, the subject of Confraternity Studies has moved on from what Konrad Eisenbichler once described as an “invisible history” to become an authoritative sub-field of late medieval and early modern scholarship. Accordingly, in order to encourage a discourse that places confraternities at the center of essential historical developments rather than at their periphery, we invite proposals for papers that explore the amplitude and impact of lay sodalities in Europe, the Americas, the East and Asia in relation to the activities of wider late medieval and early modern society. Papers might focus on, but are not limited to the following topics:

·     The reach and range of lesser traversed sodalities. For example, slave confraternities.

·     The relationships between lay companies and non members. For instance, confraternal liaisons with artisans, food merchants or second-hand clothes sellers.

·     Confratelli and consorelle entrusted with public service, healthcare and the custody of people or objects.

·     The influence of confraternal ritual and recreation on urban spaces.

·     Individual and familial investment in lay companies in order to garner social influence or to gain political power.

·     Associations between the devotional lives of non-clerics and the ordained: how these affinities played out in rituals, drama and music.

·     The impact of art, architecture and ephemera commissioned by confraternities on public spaces and/or the popular conscience.

Papers should concentrate on confraternal activities between 1300 and 1700. We are however, also particularly interested in proposals that discuss retrospectively, the value of studies that have emerged since the conference in 1989 and consider how Confraternity Studies will advance into the twenty-first century.

Proposals should include the presenter’s name, academic affiliation, email, the paper title (no longer than 15 words), the abstract of the paper (no longer than 150 words), a brief academic C.V. (not longer than 300 words), and a series of key-words that suit the presentation. Please be sure all nine (7) categories of information are clearly provided. 

Please submit your proposal to Dr Samantha J.C. Hughes-Johnson at samanthajanecaroline@yahoo.co.uk by 1 August 2018.

 

Tags:  architecture  art  artisans  confraternity  contested spaces  early modern global exchange  ephemera  healthcare  hospital  lay company  material culture  merchants  political power  public service  recreation  retrospective discussion  ritual  social influence  sodality  urban spaces 

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Rethinking Renaissance and Early Modern Musical Instruments

Posted By Emanuela Vai, Thursday, July 5, 2018
Updated: Thursday, July 5, 2018

Rethinking Renaissance and Early Modern Musical Instruments

Music has long been theorised as intangible culture separate from the materiality of musical instruments. Moving beyond approaches that position musical instruments merely as containers for sound, this panel aims to rethink and reassess their material, visual, affective and social dimensions. Recent interdisciplinary ‘turns’ towards new materialisms, posthumanisms, sensorialities and object-orientated ontologies are opening up alternative theoretical and methodological pathways and perspectives for engaging with the material culture of music. Building on this growing interest in the agency and vitality of matter, and the social lives and affective dynamics of objects, this panel invites papers that engage with the non-auditory or para-sonic aspects of Renaissance and Early Modern musical instruments. Entangled in cultural flows and commodity chains, instruments moved through Renaissance worlds, articulating meaning, establishing relations and signifying social status as they did so. Musical instruments materially index an array of cultural, political and aesthetic values and were designed not only to be played and heard but to be seen, sold and dis-played. Bringing together scholars from across the disciplines, this panel aims to promote discussion of musical instruments by exploring the ways in which they were valued and made to have meaning, their materiality and aesthetics, and the range of relationships formed between musical instruments and musicians, craftspeople, collectors and sellers.

 

Topics could address but are by no means limited to:

 

-       The social lives of musical instruments

-       Musical instruments and the museological gaze

-       Ornamentation, iconography, and aesthetics

-       The challenges and opportunities of object-orientated and materialist approaches

-       Silenced, collected and dis-played musical instruments

-       Practices of instrument production and consumption

-       Musical instruments and gender/social/class status

-       Object histories

-     Instruments as models and metaphors in Renaissance scientific epistemologies,  cosmologies and ontologies

-       Epistemological aspects of museum documentation and curatorial practices

-       Musical instruments as material culture

-       New technologies and historical research: digital imaging, modelling, making and interpretation of cultural heritage objects

 

This CFP invites paper proposals from scholars working in musicology, art history, organology, cultural history, material and visual culture studies and anthropology. As per RSA guidelines, please send proposals including presenter’s name and affiliation (if applicable), email, paper title (15-word maximum), abstract (150-word maximum), keywords, and a brief curriculum vitae to the organiser Emanuela Vai [ev321@cam.ac.ukby Friday, 27 July 2018.

Presenters will need to be members of the RSA by the time of the conference. Submission guidelines are available at https://www.rsa.org/page/2019SubmissionsGuideFeel free to email with any questions.

 Attached Files:

Tags:  anthropology  art history  cultural heritage  digital humanities  iconography  material culture  museum practices  musical instruments  musicology  organology  ornamentation and aesthetics  scientific epistemologies and ontologies  sensory studies  visual studies 

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More Than Merely Passive: Addressing the Early Modern Audience

Posted By John R. Decker, Monday, July 2, 2018
Updated: Monday, July 9, 2018

“… so that the learned may savor the profundity of the allegory while the humble may profit from the lightness of the story” (de modo praedicandi)

 

Early modern audiences were not homogenous. Differences in status, education, language, wealth, and experience (to name only a few) could influence how a group of people, or a particular person, received and made sense of sermons, public proclamations, images, objects, and spaces. The ways in which images, objects, proclamations, etc. were framed and executed could have a serious impact on their relevance and effectiveness. This session seeks papers that investigate the ways in which authors, artists, preachers, theologians, and civic or court officials took account of and encoded pluriform audiences in their works. Topics might consider, but are not limited to, questions such as: What sorts of strategies were employed to take into account multiple ‘levels’ of audience? How well did such strategies work? What were the consequences—possible or actual—when they failed? Please submit an abstract and CV by no later than 30 July, 2018 to: jdecker@pratt.edu.

Tags:  art history  artists  collaboration  cultural history  gender  identity  images  imagination  invention  literature  material culture  patronage  religious communities  representation  social history  urban spaces  urbanism  visual arts  visual communication  visual culture 

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Character beyond Shakespeare

Posted By Harry Newman, Thursday, June 7, 2018

Despite the rise of new character criticism and other important movements (e.g. new materialism, the history of emotions, digital humanities), early modern scholarship on character remains dominated by Shakespeare’s plays and their dramatis personae. “Non-Shakespearean” character and characterization tend to be judged according to “Shakespearean” models of “interiority”, “individuation” and “depth”. Narratives of the historical development of character continue to focus on ground broken by Shakespeare, especially at the turn of the seventeenth century, with plays such as Julius Caesar and Hamlet still reigning supreme as game-changers.

This panel invites papers that investigate non-Shakespearean models and paradigms of character in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England, whether in dramatic, non-dramatic or non-literary contexts. Papers might consider the following:

·         What are the significance of characterization techniques developed by playwrights such as Thomas Kyd, John Marston, Francis Beaumont, John Fletcher, Thomas Heywood, Thomas Middleton and Philip Massinger?
·         How does character work in non-dramatic genres such poetry, historiography and life-writing? How were notions of fictional persons shaped—for example—by the rise of English prose fiction from the 1560s, the vogue for sonnets and epigrams in the 1590s, and the popularity of “character” books from the 1610s?
·         Do neglected or derided types of character need to be (re)assessed, such as allegorical characters, bit parts or “extras”, animal characters, humoral personalities, and co-authored characters?
·         What is the importance of authors who write across genres such as George Gascoigne, Robert Greene, John Lyly, Thomas Dekker, Thomas Nashe and John Webster, female authors such as Isabella Whitney, Mary Wroth, Aemilia Lanyer, Mary Sidney, Anne Clifford and Margaret Cavendish, or non-authorial agents of character-creation such as stationers, scribes, patrons, actors, audiences and readers?
·         What are the roles of character and impersonation in “non-literary” texts, such as sermons, medical manuals and conduct books, or even “non-textual” forms in material and visual culture (e.g. paintings, architecture, emblems, jewellery, gaming cards & tokens)?
·         How does the lexicon of character and characterization (e.g. charactery, personation, passionating, inwardness) develop outside the Shakespeare canon?
·         How are digital media creating new access to and new forms of interaction with early modern characters beyond the Shakespeare canon?


Papers may discuss Shakespearean drama, but must do so in relation to other early modern authors, genres or forms. Non-traditional and experimental approaches are encouraged, as are alternative historical narratives that challenge Shakespeare’s place at the epicentre of early modern character criticism. Proposals are welcome from scholars working in any discipline.

Please submit your paper proposal by 15th July 2018 to Harry Newman at harry.newman@rhul.ac.uk. The proposal should include:

·         Name, affiliation and email address
·         Paper title (15 words max)
·         Abstract (150 words max)
·         Keywords
·         Curriculum vitae (300 words max)

Tags:  book history  character  digital humanities  drama  early modern  literature  material culture  Shakespeare  the canon  the non-Shakespearean 

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Books and Bodies in Early Modern England

Posted By Jillian Linster, Monday, June 4, 2018
Updated: Thursday, July 5, 2018

Organizers: Jillian Linster (University of South Dakota) and Harry Newman (Royal Holloway, University of London)

This panel investigates links between literary and medical culture in early modern England (c. 1500-1700), focusing on the intersections of book history and medical humanities. Scholarship has started to address the physiology of reading, the role of the book trade in disseminating and shaping medical knowledge, and the mutually influential relationship between literary and medical texts. Building on this work, we seek papers focused on the physical and conceptual relationships between books and bodies in early modernity. Papers might consider the following:

·      How did changing technologies, laws, reading habits, and/or the rise of print culture affect the interaction of bodies and books in this period?

·      How did specific books come to represent individual people, and vice versa?

·      How were the bodies of books shaped and reshaped by physical encounters with human bodies (e.g. printers, book binders, readers)?

·      Does the relationship between books and bodies help us to understand power and agency in early modernity?

·      Why is it important to investigate the material lives and textual histories of medical books (anatomical works, midwifery manuals, dietaries, casebooks, herbals, medical receipt books, etc.)?

·      How is the relationship between books and bodies depicted in literary works, artistic renderings, and historical documents from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries?

·      How useful are distinctions between ‘literary’ and ‘medical’ texts when considering the book-body relationship?

·      What was the influence of other cultures (European or non-Western) on English perceptions of books and bodies?

Approaches might include or combine book history, medical humanities, ecocriticism, new materialism, sociological or anthropological theory, social and cultural history, and biblical studies. Non-traditional or experimental lines of inquiry are encouraged. Proposals are welcome from scholars working in any discipline.

Please submit your paper proposal by 15th July 2018, to Jillian Linster and Harry Newman at booksandbodies.panel@gmail.com. The proposal should include the following information in a single document:

·      Name, affiliation and email address

·      Paper title (15 words max)

·      Abstract (150 words max)

·      Keywords

·      One-page CV (300 words max)

Tags:  art history  book history  cultural history  early modern  gender  gender studies  history  interdisciplinary  literature  material culture  networks  print culture  religion 

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Printers, their Social Networks, and the Public Sphere.

Posted By Scott K. Oldenburg, Monday, May 28, 2018

For a proposed panel at RSA 2019 (Toronto, 17 -19 March): I am seeking papers on early modern printers. Our modern sense of publishers as (more often than not) merely profiting from the creative agency of authors obscures the meaningful role early printers had in cultural production, politics (conservative and radical), the reception of major works, and the establishment of a public sphere. Printers sometimes simply sought sales, but they also often specialized and promoted particular agendas. Thomas Berthelet, for instance, printed several texts in support of the humanist education of women; French Protestant printer Thomas Vautrollier teamed up with Arthur Golding to produce Huguenot propaganda; and a few weeks after a stint in Newgate, Gabriel Simson printed Luke Hutton’s The Black Dog of Newgate, a scathing attack on the conditions in that prison. In what ways did individual printers shape the discourse of the period? How did the social network of a printer, or the materials of a particular shop contribute to ideological output? How did female printers (Elizabeth Allde, Jacqueline Vautrollier, Ellen Boyle, and others) influence prevailing ideas of gender or religion? How did specific apprenticeships influence the output of particular shops? In what ways did the Stationers Company and other such organizations facilitate or hinder open discourse? Although the above examples are about English print shops, the call is open to scholars working in other languages and regions as well. Proposals due August 1, 2018.

Send proposals to Scott Oldenburg, soldenbu@tulane.edu

Proposals should include 1) paper title; 2) abstract (150-word max.); 3) short cv (300-word max, not prose); 4) list of five keywords; 5) AV requirements. Note that panelists must register for the conference and arrange for their own travel and lodging. 

Tags:  book history  gender  material culture  microhistory  print culture 

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Material Culture and the Domestic Interior: New Questions, New Approaches

Posted By Maria DePrano, Tuesday, May 22, 2018

While examinations of the Early Modern home flourished in the early twentieth century with works such as Paul Schubring’s on cassoni, the At Home in Renaissance Italy exhibition, which opened at the Victoria and Albert Museum in fall 2006, was a watershed for the examination of material culture. This was followed by the Art and Love in Renaissance Italy exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2008. These exhibitions both responded to a growing interest in material culture and inspired additional studies. Scholars have approached the domestic interior and material culture from diverse directions examining particular rooms, religious communities, types of furnishings, and private homes in major cities. What has been learned in the decade since the groundswell of research around At Home in Renaissance Italy? What avenues remain to be explored? What regions, cities, classes, or ethnic and religious minorities need to be examined? Has gender in the domestic interior been sufficiently considered? Could more work be done on unmarried women and widows? This CFP invites paper proposals from scholars working on the material culture and the domestic interior of Early Modern Europe. Please send title (15-word maximum), abstract (150-word maximum), keywords, and short C.V. to the organizers, Erin J. Campbell (erinjc@uvic.ca) and Maria DePrano (mdeprano@ucmerced.edu) by August 1, 2018.

Tags:  class  domestic interior  furnishings  gender  home  material culture  palaces  religious communities 

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