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Interdisciplinary and Miscellaneous CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
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This blog is for CfPs for interdisciplinary sessions for RSA 2019 Toronto, as well as those that do not fit into the Art History, History, or Literature discipline categories. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Top tags: literature  art history  interdisciplinary  early modern  material culture  social history  art  book history  cultural history  gender  history  architecture  print culture  religion  circulation  classical reception  global  History of Science  identity  patronage  political history  transcultural  courts  digital humanities  gender studies  history of reading  Humanism  Philosophy  urban spaces  visual arts 

CFP: Medicine, books, & herbs: pharmacology in Renaissance Europe

Posted By Caroline Petit, Thursday, July 26, 2018

Call For Papers

Renaissance Society of America

Annual Conference, March 17-19, 2019, Toronto, Canada

 

Medicine, books, & herbs: pharmacology in Renaissance Europe

 

This panel invites papers dedicated to pharmacological works and their readership in Renaissance Europe. Following the rediscovery of ancient medical works on drugs (notably Dioscorides’ and Galen’s) and the rise of new Latin translations, pharmacology as a field began to take shape in early modern Europe. The conflation of old texts and ancient authorities with new discoveries on the ground, in the Mediterranean, in the New World and in the East, resulted in a complex pattern of enduring old frameworks and new material. This panel aims at promoting detailed analyses of texts, with the hope to shed light on little-known authors and works. It also aims at examining potential interactions between new and ancient knowledge, and the dynamics of “reception” in the wake of an expanded, problematic world.

 

 

Interested participants are encouraged to consider the following themes:

 

*the role of herbs, drugs and antidotes (and especially theriac) in Renaissance texts (medical and not)

*the reception of ancient and medieval works on pharmacology (especially Galen)

*the diffusion of pharmacological knowledge throughout Renaissance Europe through books and other forms of communication

*methodological and theoretical discussion in pharmacology

*the role of currently under-researched medical authors (such as Prospero Alpini) in the development of pharmacology

*the role of translators and travellers in enriching the materia medica

*the importance of colonial approaches in the formation of early modern pharmacology

*national/nativist traditions in pharmacology

 

 

This panel is sponsored by the Medicine & Science discipline representative.

 

Please submit short abstract (150 words max.) and brief CV (one page max.) by August 8, 2018 to Caroline Petit at the following address : agostino@carolinepetit.net

Tags:  book history  classical reception  history of medicine  Humanism  microhistory  print culture  Renaissance 

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Landscapes of Alterity, c. 1500-1700 [extended deadline: August 6, 2018]

Posted By Francesco Freddolini, Wednesday, July 25, 2018
Updated: Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Organizers: Erin E. Benay and Francesco Freddolini

 

Early modern prints, frontispieces, book illustrations, and paintings often imagined Asia, Africa, or the New World in terms of its ecosystem. These images, designed with European readers/viewers in mind, provided early modern audiences with glimpses of distant geographies and landscapes, real or imagined. For instance, Jacopo Stradano’s landscapes in his Nova Reperta series, although figments of the artist’s imagination, play a crucial role in defining lands that are waiting for European appropriation. Similarly, the landscapes in Albert Eckhout’s or Frans Post’s paintings contribute as much to the complexity of otherness and discourses of colonization as do the figures in these pictures.  The people, flora, and fauna illustrated in Athanasius Kircher’s China Monumentis exist in landscapes that fully participate in the construction of such images’ meanings.  

The authors of sixteenth and seventeenth-century textual accounts of foreign lands similarly attempted to characterize the most marvelous topographic features of distant lands. However, scholarship on these images and texts has often focused on the proto-ethnographic way in which these sources could convey ‘information’ (however inaccurate) about the landscapes from which the products derived.  Alternately, scholars have considered the collection of foreign, ‘exotic,’ natural specimens (bulbs, plant samples), animals (living or represented), and other natural ‘wonders’ as components in microcosmic studioli or Wunderkammern, or have privileged the images that isolate specimens of flora and fauna from their ecosystem.

Rather than see flora and fauna as curiosities, devoid of spatial context, however, we hope to explore instead the ways in which early modern artists imagined, represented, manipulated, and invented non-European landscapes. Landscape, as a genre, had a long-standing and codified tradition in early modern Europe. By interrogating the ways in which this tradition accommodated or contributed to narratives of colonization and empire-building, we hope that we might better understand the agency of landscape as a genre and as a forum for the construction of ‘foreignness.’  We seek papers that focus on the spatial, cultural, and natural context of landscapes as sites for the production of knowledge and for the evolving discourse of ‘otherness’ in early modern Europe.  Papers in this session might address the following questions:

·         How does the genre of landscape incorporate observation, specificity (real or illusory), and notions of scientific accuracy to evoke the ‘exotic?’

·         In what ways did artists force the limits of the genre, or manipulate the veracity of the landscape in order to comply with the conventions of the genre, while representing non-European landscapes? 

·         In what ways did artists (such as Frans Post or Albert Eckhout) work to shape European conceptions about foreign places?

·         How did the diverse, and often competing agendas of various European countries shape the way in which foreign lands were represented, for example as welcoming, hostile, civilized, built, or savage?

·         How did foreign landscapes, often manipulated to comply with the conventions of the European genre, accommodate local architecture? How are the tensions between colonial architecture and foreign ecosystems articulated by artists?

 

Please submit proposals to Erin Benay (eeb50@case.edu) and Francesco Freddolini (francesco.freddolini@uregina.ca) by August 6, 2018. Proposals should include a paper title (15-word maximum); and abstract (150-word maximum); keywords; and a brief academic CV (300-word maximum). Submission guidelines available at https://www.rsa.org/page/2019SubmissionsGuide .

Tags:  alterity  art history  colonialism  early modern global exchanges  exoticism  landscape  print culture 

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Printing, Reception, Editing, and Teaching Thomas More and Early Humanists

Posted By Emily A. Ransom, Tuesday, July 24, 2018
The Amici Thomae Mori is excited to welcome proposals for papers on Thomas More studies to coincide with the publication of the new Essential Works of Thomas More (Yale University Press, 2019).  This single-volume, accessible, readable edition will be the third major collection of More’s works in nearly five hundred years, after the 1557 Workes published by More’s nephew William Rastell and the Yale Complete Works in fifteen volumes completed in 1997. Though papers on all areas of Thomas More studies will be considered, the Amici is especially interested in topics that will complement this important publication, such as print history of humanist texts, reception history of Thomas More and early humanists, editing humanist texts, and teaching humanist texts in the modern classroom.

To submit a paper, please send your title (15-word max), abstract (150-word max), a few keywords, CV, PhD completion date (past or expected), and affiliation to Emily Ransom (ransome@uwgb.edu) by August 10, 2018.  

Tags:  archives  book history  catholic reform  circulation  classical reception  cultural history  devotion  history  history of reading  history of the book  Humanism  interdisciplinary  literature  pedagogy  philosophy  political history  print culture  publishers  religion  transmission 

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In Search of the Canon: Poets and Artists Confronting with their Models (c. 1500-1700)

Posted By Maria G. Matarazzo, Thursday, July 19, 2018

The theory of Imitation was a central topic of discussion in the ‘Republic of Letters’. The European community of humanists, philosophers, poets and artists was engaged in the dispute over the models to refer to during the creative process. How to develop a normative canon as a reference point for artists and writers in the practice of Imitation? Which poets and artists to select as the examples of ‘bello stile’?

While the authority of ancient models was universally acknowledged, the building of a canon of modern masters was under discussion. One of the typical environments of this discussion were the Academies, where writers, artists, philosophers, antiquarians gathered around learned patrons.

Considering the interdisciplinary nature of this debate, this panel aims to explore the construction of a canon through a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective. The main purpose is not only to study the mechanisms implied in the building of the canon but also to bring out the intersections between Art and Literature concerning this topic.

Questions to be considered include but are not limited to: the institutions where the debate took place, with a particular focus on the Academies; rhetorical devices for debating the canon and the metaphors of Imitation; the circulation of the canon through publishing, printings, new editions and reproductive printmaking; the impact of the canon on the teaching practices.

 

Please submit proposals to Ida Duretto (ida.duretto@sns.it) and Maria Gabriella Matarazzo (mariagabriella.matarazzo@sns.it) by August 12, 2018.

Proposals should include a paper title, an abstract (150-word maximum), keywords and a CV (300-word maximum).

Tags:  academies  Art History  book history  cultural history  early modern  history of reading  history of the book  Imitation  interdisciplinary  literature  mimesis  patronage  philology  Poetry  print culture  publishers  reproductive prints  the canon  visual arts 

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Call for Panels: SHARP @ RSA 2019 Deadline 7/30

Posted By Andie Silva, Monday, July 16, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, July 24, 2018

The Society for the History of Authorship, Reading & Publishing (SHARP) will sponsor up to four panels at the Renaissance Society of America’s annual meeting in Toronto, ON on 17-19 March 2019. SHARP @ RSA brings together scholars working on any aspect of the creation, dissemination, and reception of manuscript and print and their digital remediation.

We invite panel submissions that consider English and/or Continental books and manuscripts from 1350 to 1700. Potential topics include print culture, history of the book, authorship, publishing history, ephemera, illustration, publishers’ archives, production, circulation, and reception. Panels addressing digital methodologies for the study of book history are especially welcome. Participants may also submit a roundtable discussion rather than a panel. Individual submissions may be considered if all four panels are not filled.

Please include all abstracts and brief CVs (up to 4 presenters and a chair/respondent) in a single .DOCX or .PDF document. Sessions may be submitted without a chair; should the submission be accepted, a chair will be assigned by the SHARP liaison or the RSA committee.

Completed session submissions should be emailed to Dr. Andie Silva (asilva[at]york.cuny.edu) by July 30, 2018. Panelists will be contacted with a decision before the formal RSA deadline. Updated (7/24) Please note: Accepted presenters will be asked to join SHARP as members (https://sharp.press.jhu.edu/membership/join) if they are not members already. 

Before submitting, please note the following RSA restrictions: All participants must be current members of RSA in order to present. In order to avoid scheduling conflicts, participants may not give more than one paper, be a discussant in more than one roundtable, or be a respondent in more than one session. A participant may chair up to two sessions. The RSA welcomes graduate student speakers who are within one or two years of defending their dissertations. However, all sessions must include at least one speaker who has received the PhD or other terminal degree. Sessions composed entirely of predoctoral speakers and sessions that include precandidates or MA students will not be considered. Predoctoral speakers should present dissertation research, not term papers. Their CVs must include the dissertation title and expected date of completion to make their eligibility clear to the Program Committee.

Tags:  archival research  archives  authorship  book history  history of reading  history of the book  material culture  print culture  printers  publishers  Readers 

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Kircher’s World

Posted By Thomas Beachdel, Friday, June 15, 2018
Updated: Friday, June 15, 2018

Call For Papers

Renaissance Society of America

Annual Conference, March 17-19, 2019, Toronto, Canada

Kircher’s World

This panel invites papers on the work, influence, or problematization of the seventeenth-century polymath, Athanasius Kircher (1602-1680). A category defying figure caught between the encyclopaedism of the Renaissance and the turn toward specialized knowledge, Kircher has not received the attention of his more “scientific” contemporaries, such as Kepler or Newton, and is often regarded as an outside figure, given his penchant for the arcane, the mysterious, and his adherence to the Hermetic tradition, despite the work of Copernicus. At the same time, the vast outpouring of Kircher’s work on a broad range of subjects—Egyptian civilization and hieroglyphs (Oedipus Aegyptiacus), music (Musurgia Universalis), China (China Monumentis), geology (Mundus Subterraneus)—was extremely influential to a wide audience during his lifetime. Of particular interest are papers dealing with Kircher’s Mundus Subterraneus and the influence of this text and his viewpoint on geology, theories of the formation of the earth, and volcanism.

Session Chair: Thomas Beachdel, CUNY, Hostos

Please submit a short (max. 150 word) abstract and CV by July 31, 2018 to: thomas.beachdel@gmail.com

Tags:  art  art history  book history  circulation  cultural history  early modern  History of Science  interdisciplinary  print culture  transcultural  visual arts  visual culturecirculation 

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Books and Bodies in Early Modern England

Posted By Jillian Linster, Monday, June 4, 2018
Updated: Thursday, July 5, 2018

Organizers: Jillian Linster (University of South Dakota) and Harry Newman (Royal Holloway, University of London)

This panel investigates links between literary and medical culture in early modern England (c. 1500-1700), focusing on the intersections of book history and medical humanities. Scholarship has started to address the physiology of reading, the role of the book trade in disseminating and shaping medical knowledge, and the mutually influential relationship between literary and medical texts. Building on this work, we seek papers focused on the physical and conceptual relationships between books and bodies in early modernity. Papers might consider the following:

·      How did changing technologies, laws, reading habits, and/or the rise of print culture affect the interaction of bodies and books in this period?

·      How did specific books come to represent individual people, and vice versa?

·      How were the bodies of books shaped and reshaped by physical encounters with human bodies (e.g. printers, book binders, readers)?

·      Does the relationship between books and bodies help us to understand power and agency in early modernity?

·      Why is it important to investigate the material lives and textual histories of medical books (anatomical works, midwifery manuals, dietaries, casebooks, herbals, medical receipt books, etc.)?

·      How is the relationship between books and bodies depicted in literary works, artistic renderings, and historical documents from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries?

·      How useful are distinctions between ‘literary’ and ‘medical’ texts when considering the book-body relationship?

·      What was the influence of other cultures (European or non-Western) on English perceptions of books and bodies?

Approaches might include or combine book history, medical humanities, ecocriticism, new materialism, sociological or anthropological theory, social and cultural history, and biblical studies. Non-traditional or experimental lines of inquiry are encouraged. Proposals are welcome from scholars working in any discipline.

Please submit your paper proposal by 15th July 2018, to Jillian Linster and Harry Newman at booksandbodies.panel@gmail.com. The proposal should include the following information in a single document:

·      Name, affiliation and email address

·      Paper title (15 words max)

·      Abstract (150 words max)

·      Keywords

·      One-page CV (300 words max)

Tags:  art history  book history  cultural history  early modern  gender  gender studies  history  interdisciplinary  literature  material culture  networks  print culture  religion 

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Printers, their Social Networks, and the Public Sphere.

Posted By Scott K. Oldenburg, Monday, May 28, 2018

For a proposed panel at RSA 2019 (Toronto, 17 -19 March): I am seeking papers on early modern printers. Our modern sense of publishers as (more often than not) merely profiting from the creative agency of authors obscures the meaningful role early printers had in cultural production, politics (conservative and radical), the reception of major works, and the establishment of a public sphere. Printers sometimes simply sought sales, but they also often specialized and promoted particular agendas. Thomas Berthelet, for instance, printed several texts in support of the humanist education of women; French Protestant printer Thomas Vautrollier teamed up with Arthur Golding to produce Huguenot propaganda; and a few weeks after a stint in Newgate, Gabriel Simson printed Luke Hutton’s The Black Dog of Newgate, a scathing attack on the conditions in that prison. In what ways did individual printers shape the discourse of the period? How did the social network of a printer, or the materials of a particular shop contribute to ideological output? How did female printers (Elizabeth Allde, Jacqueline Vautrollier, Ellen Boyle, and others) influence prevailing ideas of gender or religion? How did specific apprenticeships influence the output of particular shops? In what ways did the Stationers Company and other such organizations facilitate or hinder open discourse? Although the above examples are about English print shops, the call is open to scholars working in other languages and regions as well. Proposals due August 1, 2018.

Send proposals to Scott Oldenburg, soldenbu@tulane.edu

Proposals should include 1) paper title; 2) abstract (150-word max.); 3) short cv (300-word max, not prose); 4) list of five keywords; 5) AV requirements. Note that panelists must register for the conference and arrange for their own travel and lodging. 

Tags:  book history  gender  material culture  microhistory  print culture 

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