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Interdisciplinary and Miscellaneous CfPs for RSA 2019 Toronto
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This blog is for CfPs for interdisciplinary sessions for RSA 2019 Toronto, as well as those that do not fit into the Art History, History, or Literature discipline categories. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Top tags: literature  art history  interdisciplinary  early modern  material culture  social history  art  book history  cultural history  gender  history  architecture  print culture  religion  circulation  classical reception  global  History of Science  identity  patronage  political history  transcultural  courts  digital humanities  gender studies  history of reading  Humanism  Philosophy  urban spaces  visual arts 

Secrecy, Catholicism, and Spycraft in Early Modern England

Posted By Kristin M. Bezio, Friday, July 27, 2018

The Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association is sponsoring a panel on Secrecy, Catholicism, and Spycraft in Early Modern England. We are seeking proposals which address the suppression, persecution, and preservation of Catholicism and Catholic praxis in early modern England following the Henrician Reformation up to 1660. We are interested in cross-disciplinary perspectives, including art and architectural history; literary depictions and works; social and cultural history; Recusant and Jesuit history; and other approaches.

Please send abstracts (150 words or less) and CVs (including expected date of completion for dissertation, if not already completed) to kbezio@richmond.edu by August 10th.

Tags:  Catholicism  cultural history  early modern  England  Literature  reformation  religion  social history  spies 

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Women’s Power and Mobility in the Renaissance

Posted By Kristin M. Bezio, Friday, July 27, 2018

The Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association is sponsoring a panel on Women’s Power and Mobility in the Renaissance. We are seeking paper proposals from any/all disciplines which address questions of women's mobility and power through art, music, or literature; in the social or political spheres; or within religious praxis or communities.

Please send abstracts (150 words or less) and CVs (including expected date of completion for dissertation, if not already completed) to kbezio@richmond.edu by August 10th.

Tags:  Literature  political history  religion  social history 

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Printing, Reception, Editing, and Teaching Thomas More and Early Humanists

Posted By Emily A. Ransom, Tuesday, July 24, 2018
The Amici Thomae Mori is excited to welcome proposals for papers on Thomas More studies to coincide with the publication of the new Essential Works of Thomas More (Yale University Press, 2019).  This single-volume, accessible, readable edition will be the third major collection of More’s works in nearly five hundred years, after the 1557 Workes published by More’s nephew William Rastell and the Yale Complete Works in fifteen volumes completed in 1997. Though papers on all areas of Thomas More studies will be considered, the Amici is especially interested in topics that will complement this important publication, such as print history of humanist texts, reception history of Thomas More and early humanists, editing humanist texts, and teaching humanist texts in the modern classroom.

To submit a paper, please send your title (15-word max), abstract (150-word max), a few keywords, CV, PhD completion date (past or expected), and affiliation to Emily Ransom (ransome@uwgb.edu) by August 10, 2018.  

Tags:  archives  book history  catholic reform  circulation  classical reception  cultural history  devotion  history  history of reading  history of the book  Humanism  interdisciplinary  literature  pedagogy  philosophy  political history  print culture  publishers  religion  transmission 

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CFP for RSA 2019 Toronto

Posted By Valery Rees, Monday, July 23, 2018
Updated: Monday, July 23, 2018

MARSILIO FICINO

Submissions are warmly welcomed for sessions being planned on various aspects of Ficino's writing and influence, and on the publication of new editions.

If you would like to join us, please send details by 6th August (or sooner!) to me, including

  • paper title (15-word maximum)
  • abstract (150-word maximum)
  • curriculum vitae (preferably .doc)
  • PhD completion date (past or expected)
  • full name, current affiliation, and email address

valery.rees@ficino.org

Tags:  Ficino  Love treatises  Medicine  Neoplatonism  Philosophy  Plato  Plotinus  Religion  Stars 

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Jesuit Studies paper

Posted By Kathleen M. Comerford, Monday, July 16, 2018
The Journal of Jesuit Studies is looking to organize panels in any aspect of Jesuit studies in any region, up to the year 1700, to include history, literature, art history, music history, or related topics, in all geographical areas.

Individual paper abstracts should be no more than 150 words and should identify up to 5 keywords.  Panel submissions should include the name of a chair who is not also a presenter.  All submissions must include a/v requests and a brief CV (including affiliation, date of PhD completion, general discipline area, rank, and publications or other evidence of scholarship) for each participant.  Please submit to Kathleen Comerford, kcomerfo@georgiasouthern.edu, no later than August 5, 2018.  We will consider panels, individual papers, and roundtables for sponsorship by the Journal of Jesuit Studies.  Sponsorship does not guarantee acceptance to the program and implies no intent to publish.

Tags:  catholic reform  cultural heritage  drama  early modern global exchange  global  history  identity  Latin  nation  political history  religion  religious communities  statecraft  transcultural  vernacular  visual studies 

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Books and Bodies in Early Modern England

Posted By Jillian Linster, Monday, June 4, 2018
Updated: Thursday, July 5, 2018

Organizers: Jillian Linster (University of South Dakota) and Harry Newman (Royal Holloway, University of London)

This panel investigates links between literary and medical culture in early modern England (c. 1500-1700), focusing on the intersections of book history and medical humanities. Scholarship has started to address the physiology of reading, the role of the book trade in disseminating and shaping medical knowledge, and the mutually influential relationship between literary and medical texts. Building on this work, we seek papers focused on the physical and conceptual relationships between books and bodies in early modernity. Papers might consider the following:

·      How did changing technologies, laws, reading habits, and/or the rise of print culture affect the interaction of bodies and books in this period?

·      How did specific books come to represent individual people, and vice versa?

·      How were the bodies of books shaped and reshaped by physical encounters with human bodies (e.g. printers, book binders, readers)?

·      Does the relationship between books and bodies help us to understand power and agency in early modernity?

·      Why is it important to investigate the material lives and textual histories of medical books (anatomical works, midwifery manuals, dietaries, casebooks, herbals, medical receipt books, etc.)?

·      How is the relationship between books and bodies depicted in literary works, artistic renderings, and historical documents from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries?

·      How useful are distinctions between ‘literary’ and ‘medical’ texts when considering the book-body relationship?

·      What was the influence of other cultures (European or non-Western) on English perceptions of books and bodies?

Approaches might include or combine book history, medical humanities, ecocriticism, new materialism, sociological or anthropological theory, social and cultural history, and biblical studies. Non-traditional or experimental lines of inquiry are encouraged. Proposals are welcome from scholars working in any discipline.

Please submit your paper proposal by 15th July 2018, to Jillian Linster and Harry Newman at booksandbodies.panel@gmail.com. The proposal should include the following information in a single document:

·      Name, affiliation and email address

·      Paper title (15 words max)

·      Abstract (150 words max)

·      Keywords

·      One-page CV (300 words max)

Tags:  art history  book history  cultural history  early modern  gender  gender studies  history  interdisciplinary  literature  material culture  networks  print culture  religion 

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Fiat Lux: Art, Religion, and Science in Early Modern Italy

Posted By Steven J. Cody, Thursday, May 3, 2018

Light is essential to the visual arts and, indeed, to vision itself. Over seventy years ago, Millard Meiss drew our attention to the ethereal, often overlooked representation of light in some fifteenth-century paintings, eventually arguing that it “could become a major pictorial theme.” As we now know, Renaissance artists engaged with notions of divinity, sacred wisdom, and visual experience—all through the effects of light. But how does one talk, in any serious manner, about something that is fundamentally intangible? The ethereal nature of light presents a challenge for the artist who attempts to depict it, the beholder who attempts to appreciate it, and the art historian who attempts to study it.

 

These panels serve as a forum for scholars who explore light’s formal, symbolic, metaphoric, and scientific dimensions. We seek participants who take innovative approaches to pictorial light and to theories of sight. Presenters are welcome to consider works of art produced in any of Italy’s locales and at any point in the early modern period, so long as the works are religious in nature. Papers that adopt an interdisciplinary focus are especially encouraged. It is our hope that, through these conversations, we will be able to reconstruct the rich context in which art, religion, and science found a common language in light.


Proposal Instructions:

Please send proposals and direct any queries to both Eric Hupe (erh4vv@virginia.edu) and Steven Cody (codys@pfw.edu). Proposals must be submitted by 1 August and include the following items:

- The presenter’s name, affiliation, and email address
- The paper’s title
- An abstract (150-word maximum)
- Keywords
- A brief CV

- PhD completion date (past or expected)

Tags:  art  History of Science  Italy  light  religion 

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Society for Early Modern Women: Call for Panels

Posted By Molly Bourne, Friday, April 27, 2018

The Society for the Study of Early Modern Women (http://ssemw.org) will sponsor up to four panels at the 2019 annual conference of the Renaissance Society of America (RSA), to be held in Toronto, 17-19 March 2019. I am soliciting proposals for pre-formed panels in any discipline that explore women and their contributions to the cultural, political, economic, or social spheres of the early modern period. Proposals that include young/emerging scholars are especially welcome. 

 

Sponsorship of a panel by the SSEMW signifies that the panel is pre-approved and automatically accepted for presentation at the RSA annual meeting.

 

Proposals for a pre-formed panel (or linked panels) should be sent to Molly Bourne (mhbourne@syr.edu), SSEMW associate organization representative for RSA, by no later than Wednesday 1 August 2018 with the following materials, assembled into a single Word document (no PDFs please):

 

-        Abstract (max 150 words) describing the panel

 

-        Names of Panel Organizer(s), Chair, Speakers & any respondent(s), including institutional affiliations + email address for each participant

 

-        One-page CV for Organizer(s) & Speakers only; max 300 words each (not in prose) 

 

-        For each paper: title (max 15 words), abstract (max 150 words) & keywords (up to 4)

 

-        Specification of any audio/visual needs

 

Decisions regarding SSEMW panel sponsorship will be sent out at least seven days prior to the regular RSA submission deadline (15 August 2018) for submission of panel or paper proposals.

 

Please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions.

Molly Bourne (mhbourne@syr.edu)

Syracuse University Florence 

Tags:  art  gender  history  literature  material culture  religion  women 

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