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RSA 2020 Philadelphia Calls for Papers
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This blog is for CfPs for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA 2020 Philadelphia. Members may post CfPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CfP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CfP. Make sure the CfP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CfP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CfP to submit a paper proposal. CfPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Top tags: Baroque  Bellini  book history  Carpaccio  gender  Giambono  giants; dwarfs; Carnival; colossi  graphic design  Italian art  mise-en-page  Quattrocento  Renaissance drawing  Renaissance painting  Rome  seventeenth-century  textual studies  Tintoretto  Titian  Venetian patronage  Venice  Veronese  Vivarini  women  Workshop 

Tintoretto Revisited

Posted By Sarah B. McHam, 21 hours ago

CFP RSA, Philadelphia, 2-4 April 2020

Tintoretto Revisited, sponsored by Save Venice

In light of recent exhibitions in Italy, Germany, France, and the United States, and numerous publications celebrating Tintoretto, as well as the conservation of a score of his paintings in Venice by Save Venice, we are soliciting papers for the Renaissance Society of America conference that explore the new ideas these activities have provoked. Proposals are welcome on any aspect of Tintoretto’s production or that of his shop, as well as reevaluations of Tintoretto’s role in Italian drawing or painting. Papers on other aspects of Tintoretto studies, including patronage, reception, and critiques of the exhibitions themselves, will also be considered.

Please send abstracts of no more than 150 words with titles of 15 words max, along with a c.v. and a list of key words, to the organizer, Sarah Blake McHam (sarah.blake.mcham@gmail.com) by Monday, July 22, 2019.

 

Tags:  Italian art  Renaissance drawing  Renaissance painting  Tintoretto  Titian  Venetian patronage  Veronese 

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Mapping the Page in Early Modern Print

Posted By Deborah Solomon, Friday, May 17, 2019
Updated: Friday, May 17, 2019

The purpose of this session is to investigate the topographies, geographies, and spaces of the early modern page. Early modern printers were mapmakers of sorts; from books to broadsides, their design choices  influence ways that readers travel across the page. The topography of the page appears on a micro-level: grooves of type bite into soft fibers of the paper, creating indentations and leaving ink marks. Impressed lines of woodcuts create micro-hills and valleys on the page. On a macro level, the verbal text, images, printer’s flowers, lines, white space, varying typography, and lines of type to guide the reader through the text.

Readers are mapmakers as well, making turns and leaving traces as they traverse lines of type and printed material. Readers make marks on their journeys through the text, leaving traces of physical presence and ideas on the pages.

We invite papers on the subject of mise-en-page, graphic design, reader interaction, and failed or flourishing layouts on the page. We welcome papers on early modern diagrams, illustrations, decorative printing, moving parts of the page (volvelles, flaps, etc), marginalia and marks of use that predict or mark the reader’s journey as a reader and user of the page.

Submissions from all disciplines are welcome.

Please submit your paper proposal no later than 31 July, 2019, to Deborah Solomon (dsolomon@auburn.edu). Each proposal must include the following:

  •   Name, university affiliation (if applicable), email address
  •   Paper Title
  •   Abstract (250-word maximum) 
  •   3 Keywords
  •  A very brief curriculum vitae (150-word maximum)

Tags:  book history  graphic design  mise-en-page  textual studies 

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Sacred Spatiality and Materiality - Call for Proposals

Posted By Nicholas Terpstra, Thursday, May 16, 2019
Updated: Thursday, May 16, 2019

The Toronto Renaissance & Reformation Colloquium plans to run a series of interdisciplinary panels on "Sacred Spatiality and Materiality" at RSA Philadelphia 2020. Please see the description and details below. For further inquiries, please contact: Ana Sekulic (asekulic@princeton.edu) or Nicholas Terpstra (nicholas.terpstra@utoronto.ca).

Scholars have moved from seeing landscape as a mere background to recognizing landscapes as agents that both reflect and shape human experiences. As many representations of the various holy sites and ritual practices around them attest, early modern actors actively translated otherworldly ideas into three-dimensional physical spaces. Interweaving the spiritual with the spatial did not, however, occur only in the well-known pilgrimage centers; clergy and laity alike routinely created and experienced the holy by sensing, moving through, and intervening in many different environments.

Pursuing this line of inquiry, we invite scholars of history, history of art and architecture, historical geography and/or anthropology, religious studies, and literature working across the geographical and political spectrum of the early modern world to submit contributions that explore a repertoire of spatial and material strategies that shaped the early modern religious experiences.

Possible questions and themes include:

  • Through what physical, textual, liturgical/ritual or other practices were holy spaces created?
  • How did certain urban, mountainous, aquatic or other natural landscapes become endowed with spirituality, as opposed to the others?
  • Similarly, how were familiar holy sites recreated in different environmental and political settings?
  • What kind of power regimes did sacred sites engender and how were they interwoven into broader social and political phenomena?


Papers are limited to 20 minutes, and we welcome presentations employing visual and digital tools. Please send a 200-word abstract and 150 word (max) CV to Ana Sekulić (asekulic@princeton.edu) by June 15th, 2019. Submissions will be reviewed by the organizing committee and TRRC Executive, and responses will be sent by the end of June.

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Call for Proposals: Africana Studies at RSA 2020 Philadelphia

Posted By Janie Cole, Monday, May 13, 2019

As incoming Discipline Representative for the newly-established Africana Studies, I am soliciting proposals for pre-formed panels, roundtables or individual papers in any discipline that explore Africa-related themes centering on the histories, politics, representations, and cultures of peoples of African origin in both Africa and the African diaspora, and their contributions to the cultural, political, economic, or social spheres of the early modern period.

1. Sponsorship of a panel (or roundtable) by Africana Studies signifies that it is pre-approved and automatically accepted for presentation at the RSA annual meeting.

Proposals for a pre-formed panel, linked panels, or roundtable should be sent to Dr. Janie Cole (colejanie@gmail.com) by no later than Monday 5 August 2019 with the following materials, assembled into a single Word document (no PDFs please). Careful adherence to these guidelines is greatly appreciated:

  • Title of panel (or roundtable) (max 15 words)
  • Abstract (max 150 words) describing the panel (or roundtable) + keywords
  • General discipline area of panel (or roundtable) (History, Art History, Literature, or other)
  • For a panel proposal: names of Organizer(s), Chair, Paper Presenters, & any Respondent(s), including current affiliation + email address for each participant
  • For a roundtable proposal: names of Organizer(s), Chair, and Discussants (min 4, max 8), including current affiliation and email address for each participant
  • CV for Panel or Roundtable Organizer(s) & Paper Presenters only (5 pages max per person, not in prose), indicating PhD completion date (past or expected)
  • For each panel paper: title (max 15 words), abstract (max 150 words) & keywords (up to 4)
  • Specification of any audio/visual needs


Decisions regarding Africana Studies panel sponsorship will be sent out at least four days prior to the regular RSA submission deadline (15 August 2019) for submission of panel or paper proposals.

Applicants for Africana Studies panel sponsorship do not need to be Society members at the time of submission, but, if successful, all members of the panel should join the Society before the 2020 RSA meeting. Participants are also expected to be/become RSA members and to register for the conference and are responsible for covering their own travel and lodging costs. Limited travel grants are available to members of the Renaissance Society of America (visit www.rsa.org).

2. I can help with organizing sessions and pulling together panel themes, which I will then submit directly on your behalf. Please write to me if you are interested in speaking on one of the following panel sessions that I am coordinating:

  • Cultural and Artistic Exchanges between Africa and Europe
  • Representations of Race in the Renaissance
  • Mediterranean Encounters: Slavery and War
  • Staging Race: Theatrical and Musical Encounters
  • African Slaves in the Atlantic and Mediterranean Worlds
  • Sex, Gender and Race in the Mediterranean and Indian Ocean Worlds
  • Transcultural Exchanges between Ethiopia and Latin Europe
  • African Diaspora in Iberia and Spain
  • Constructing Race, Identity and Religion in the Early Modern World
  • Indian Ocean World Encounters: Musical Migrations in the Early Modern World


Proposals for individual papers should be sent to Dr. Janie Cole (colejanie@gmail.com) by no later than Monday 5 August 2019 with the following materials:

  • Individual paper titles (max 15 words)
  • A 150-word maximum paper abstract
  • A 300-word max 1 page CV in paragraph form
  • Keywords (general, not specific)
  • AV requirements


Please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions.

Sincerely,
Dr. Janie Cole
University of Cape Town, The South African College of Music

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Renaissance Society of America Discipline Panel(s) on Emblems: “Remembering Places, Places of Remembering"

Posted By William E. Engel, Monday, May 13, 2019
Updated: Monday, May 13, 2019

Renaissance Society of American Discipline Panels(s) on Emblems: “Remembering Places, Places of Remembering “

We are inviting 20-minute illustrated papers that present and analyze case studies pertaining to visual and mnemonic culture, any region, location, venue welcome: programme descriptions (whether processional or tableaux, ephemeral or marmoreal); accounts of emblems civic, dynastic, theatrical, domestic, or heraldic; monuments and other commemorative built environments. Panel(s) will be organized topically.

A banquet is planned to provide convivial “after discussion” among the panelists working on these related and overlapping themes (funded externally).

Please send full name and contact information, paper title (15 words max), abstract (150-word max), PhD completion date (past or expected), up to five keywords, and a non-narrative curriculum vitae (300-word max) to Bill Engel (wengel@sewanee.edu).  Submission deadline is 8 July 2019.

 

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Society for Study of Early Modern Women & Gender: Call for Panel Proposals

Posted By Molly Bourne, Sunday, May 12, 2019

The Society for the Study of Early Modern Women & Gender invites proposals for pre-formed panels (or roundtables) in any discipline that explore women and gender across the early modern world. Sponsorship of a panel (or roundtable) by the SSEMWG signifies that it is pre-approved and automatically accepted for presentation at the RSA annual meeting.

 

Proposals should be sent to Molly Bourne (mhbourne@syr.edu), SSEMWG associate organization representative for RSA, by Monday 5 August 2019 with the following materials, assembled into a single Word document:

  • Title of panel (or roundtable) (max 15 words)
  • Abstract (max 150 words) describing the panel (or roundtable) + keywords
  • General discipline area of panel (or roundtable) (History, Art History, Literature, or other)
  • For a panel proposal: names of Organizer(s), Chair, Paper Presenters, & any Respondent(s), including current affiliation + email address for each participant
  • For a roundtable proposal: names of Organizer(s), Chair, and Discussants (min 4, max 8), including current affiliation and email address for each participant
  • CV for Panel or Roundtable Organizer(s) & Paper Presenters only (5 pages max per person, not in prose), indicating PhD completion date (past or expected)
  • For each panel paper: title (max 15 words), abstract (max 150 words) & keywords (up to 4)
  • Specification of any audio/visual needs


Decisions regarding SSEMWG sponsorship will be sent out at least four days prior to the RSA deadline (15 August 2019) for submission of panel or paper proposals. Successful applicants should be/become members of the SSEMWG.

 

Tags:  gender  women 

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Seventeenth-century Rome: An Interdisciplinary Panel

Posted By Franco Mormando, Saturday, May 11, 2019
Updated: Saturday, May 11, 2019

Papers on any aspects of the history, culture, art, architecture, religion, economy, etc. of Baroque Rome are invited. Papers that study Rome "from the margins," or "behind the scenes" or "from below" are especially encouraged. Send to me by August 1st at mormando@bc.edu a short abstract with the title of your paper, as well as a brief (one-page) CV.

Tags:  Baroque  Rome  seventeenth-century 

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Art in Fifteenth-Century Venice: New Research, New Approaches, New Ideas

Posted By Daniel W. Maze, Saturday, May 11, 2019

In recent years, a number of groundbreaking art historians of Renaissance Venice have retired.

Few early career scholars, it seems, are now focusing their research on art and artists of Quattrocento Venice.

This panel invites papers, from early career and senior scholars, that explore any aspect of art in fifteenth-century Venice. Session(s) will be organized topically.

A final dinner is planned, so that Venetianists of this period can get to know like-minded colleagues working in the field.

Please send your paper title, abstract (150-word maximum), PhD completion date (past or expected), keywords, and a curriculum vitae (no longer than 5 pages) to venice.rsa@gmail.com or to Daniel Wallace Maze (daniel-maze@uiowa.edu).  Submission deadline is August 1, 2019.

Tags:  Bellini  Carpaccio  Giambono  Quattrocento  Venice  Vivarini  Workshop 

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Giants and Dwarfs in Early Modern Europe

Posted By Robin O'Bryan, Saturday, May 11, 2019

Nourished by biblical accounts, classical precedents, and medieval traditions, the cultural interest in giants and dwarfs came of age in the early modern period. In the popular realm, the two were often to be found in carnivals, fairs, and religious festivals, the role of giants enacted by effigies or people wearing stilts. Dwarfs especially became important additions to the royal and princely courts, enlisted for amusement and prestige and featured in the ruler’s pageantry and protocol. In art, dwarfs were ubiquitous motifs in painting and sculpture, with giants portrayed literally or expressed metaphorically in colossi or other “gigantified” works. Inspired by the Arthurian and Carolingian romances, chivalric spectacles were staged with dwarfs and giants, while burlesque poets and playwrights paid homage to the two in their mock-heroic poems and dramatic endeavors.

This session seeks papers dealing with any aspect of giants and/or dwarfs in early modern Europe. Topics might focus on their appearance in ephemeral entertainments; their exhibition in popular fairs and carnivals; as characters in legends, folkloric traditions, and dynastic histories; as leitmotifs in artistic and literary works; as embodiments of the period taste for the marvelous; and as manifestations of the Other. Please send 150-word abstract, keywords, and c.v. to the session organizers: Felicia Else felse@gettysburg.edu and Robin O’Bryan rlobryan@comcast.net by July 15, 2019.

Tags:  giants; dwarfs; Carnival; colossi 

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CfP: Renaissance Echoes: the Afterlife of a Myth

Posted By Simona Lorenzini, Friday, May 10, 2019

Among literatures, arts, philosophy, and psychology, the mythological figure of Narcissus has become a common topic of interest; quite the opposite can be said of Echo, the nymph sentenced by divine law to repeat fragments of another’s voice. Yet, in the original Ovidian myth, Echo plays a remarkable role that frames the whole Narcissus’ episode. This panel aims at exploring Echo’s mythological echoes in Renaissance literature, art, theater, and music from different perspectives:

  • Translations, receptions, reinterpretations of the Ovidian myth;
  • Echo voices in the pastoral genre;
  • Echo as rhetorical and musical device;
  • Echo as form of intertextual reference/literary allusions;
  • Echo as the embodiment of the lyrical subject or of the author’s voice.


We welcome proposals for 20-minute papers on (but not limited to) the above-mentioned topics. Please send abstracts with paper title (maximum 150-words-long), a short bio, your affiliation, keywords, and general discipline area to the organizers, Giulia Cardillo (cardilgx@jmu.edu) and Simona Lorenzini (simona.lorenzini@yale.edu) by July 31st, 2019.

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NONEXTANT

Posted By Dana E. Katz, Thursday, May 9, 2019

 

What do we learn from the study of objects, images, texts, and performances that no longer exist? How do we write histories of things that are absent, silent, destroyed, or lost? What kinds of methodologies do studies of nonextant materials employ? How do ekphrasis, iconoclasm, memory, re-enactment, and reconstruction factor into such work? 

We are organizing two interdisciplinary panels for the Renaissance Society of America conference in Philadelphia on April 2-4, 2020 that explore things that are no longer extant. We seek to study this subject between and through disciplinary boundaries, and encourage papers that test new methodologies and/or consider the implications of the nonextant in the historiography of our disciplines. Please send a 150-word abstract and short CV to Dana E. Katz (katzda@reed.edu) and Dawn Odell (dvo@lclark.edu) by Monday, July 22, 2019.

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