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RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
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The “Musical” Language of Painting

Posted By Barbara Swanson, Monday, June 1, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, June 3, 2020

In recent years, both art historians and musicologists have intensified their consideration of relations between Early Modern painting and music from a variety of perspectives. With respect to painting, these perspectives encompass the artist’s embodied practice, from the demonstration of virtuosity to that of improvisation; the character of the artist’s mark-making at the moment of execution and as a trace that lingers on the image after that; aspects of compositional structure and iconography that represent musical harmony, whether literally or figuratively, among other musical themes; and the codification of all these possibilities in contemporary treatises and related texts. Even so, scholars have devoted relatively little attention to the details of language embedded in the textual discourse through which these relations were articulated during the period.

This session will explore how musically informed discourse, and especially key words and phrases, are evocatively marshalled to animate, clarify, and capture the act and essence of painting. Which words and phrases are commonly—or uncommonly—employed to evoke painterly practice? Under what circumstances are they invoked and/or invented? What constitutes their critical fortune during the Early Modern period?

Proposals for papers taking up these questions, ideally with a key word or phrase at the centre of a trenchant analysis, are warmly welcomed. Please email your proposal, including abstract (maximum 150 words), CV (per RSA guidelines), and note indicating audio-visual equipment requirements, to Leslie Korrick (korrick@yorku.ca) and Barbara Swanson (bswanson@dal.ca) by July 24, 2020.

This session is sponsored by the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies (CRRS) at Victoria University in the University of Toronto.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Music 

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