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RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
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This blog is a space for RSA members to post calls for papers and lightning talks for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA Dublin 2021. Papers could be solicited for a traditional panel or a seminar session which will have pre-circulated papers.

To post a CfP, log in to your RSA and select "Add New Post" at the top of this page. Make sure to include the organizer's name, email address, and a deadline for proposals. The session organizer is responsible for uploading the finalized proposal to the RSA Dublin 2021 submission site.

The general submission deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 is 15 August 2020. For more details on the submission process, see the Submission Guidelines page.

Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Top tags: Art and Architecture  Art History  History  Italian Renaissance Art  Book History  Italian Literature  English Literature  Women and Gender  Comparative Literature  Medicine and Science  Visual Studies  Classical Tradition  Philosophy  Performing Arts and Theater  Humanism  Material Culture  Neo-Latin Literature  Religious Studies  Digital Humanities  Legal and Political Thought  Literature  Rhetoric  Religion  Associate Organizations  French Literature  Hispanic Literature  history of science  Italy  Jesuits  Material Studies 

‘Caught in the act’: the representation of action in early modern portraiture

Posted By Marije Osnabrugge, 7 minutes ago

Early modern portraiture, far from being a clearly defined and static genre, is characterized by a progressive departure from strictly descriptive modes of representation. The portrait comes to life through the person’s dress, posture, and facial expression and by the setting and objects that surround them, as well as by its use, agency and performative qualities. As such, the depicted person’s action(s) and ‘acting’ (visual performance) are not limited to physical movement, but might imply a variety of other elements as well.

The increased significance of action is reflected in theoretical writings and humanist inquiries about the notion of self. From the fifteenth century onwards, the parameters that define persona, behavior and appearance underwent continuous scrutiny and were the object of fierce debate. The human self came to be understood as a versatile being, assuming different roles according to the specific context of performance. Looking at action in portraiture – whether drawn, painted, engraved, sculpted or written - allows us to grasp both the apparent as well as underlying structures of the early modern concept of selfhood.

In this panel, we would like to explore the notion of ‘action’ with regard to early modern portraiture in Europe. What does action mean and how does it affect the visual representation, the artistic practice of artists working in this genre, and the portrait’s reception?

Possible subjects include, but are not limited to:

  • the representation of a person's actions
  • the role of the background of portraits for action and narrative
  • the relation between materiality of the artwork and the suggestion of movement
  • hybridity of genres and/or subject-matters (portrait historié, allegorical portrait, tournament or masquerade portraits etc.) 
  • examples of the agency of portraits 
  • parallels between visual and literary portraits 
  • the interaction between word and image (emblematic portraiture and impresa), and how it generates movement and action in portraiture
  • engravings, paintings and sculpture of illustrious men, group portraits (guilds, military group etc.) as representing 'men and women of action'
  • the concept of motion and immobility in early modern portraiture
    practical guidelines

Please submit proposals to Angela Benza (angela.benza@unige.ch), Nicolas Bock (Nicolas.Bock@unil.ch) and Marije Osnabrugge (marije.osnabrugge@unige.ch ) by 10 August 2020.

They should include:
- a paper title (max. 15 words)
- an abstract (max. 150 words)
- relevant keywords
- a brief CV (max. one page, including your full name, affiliation, email address, and degree completion date, past or expected)

 Attached Files:

Tags:  Art History  French art  Italian Renaissance Art  Netherlandish art  portraiture  Spanish art 

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"Dante's Legacy in Renaissance Politics & Religion" (sponsored by Dante Society of America)

Posted By Aileen A. Feng, 6 hours ago
Updated: 6 hours ago

Organized by Erminia Ardissino (Università degli Studi di Torino), with Aileen A. Feng (University of Arizona; Dante Society of America's representative to RSA)


This panel intends to shed new, broader light on the use of Dante’s works in the religious turmoil of Renaissance Europe and the foundation of the early modern political world. While at the end of the fifteenth century in Florence the poet was wrongly believed to be the translator of seven penitential psalms and the author of a Credo, both of which were print successes running into several editions, his Comedy and political treatise De monarchia were later taken as examples of an anti-papal position, especially in the Reformed world and in heterodox circles. On the 700th anniversary of Dante's death, to be celebrated in 2021, this panel will explore the interpretation, editing, manipulation, and use of Dante’s writings in religious and/or political terms within the frame of European religious strife, when the poet’s ideas were used to support or attack various confessional identities. Moreover, we are interested in the use of his political works not only in religious controversies, but also in the process of founding a new political science as political autonomy from religion was sought.  In addition to papers focused on Italy, we particularly encourage projects dealing with the reception and interpretation of Dante outside of Italy, in other countries involved in religious reformation.

On or before 1 August 2020, please send the following documents/information to Erminia Ardissino (erminia.ardissino@unito.it) and Aileen A. Feng (aafeng@arizona.edu): 

• full name, current academic affiliation, and email address

• PhD completion date (past or expected)
• paper title (15-word maximum)
• abstract (150-word maximum)
• curriculum vitae (5 pages, maximum)
• A / V needs

Tags:  Comparative Literature  Italian Literature  Legal and Political Thought  Religion  Religious Studies 

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Early modern Anglo-Italian encounters: reframing travel, transit and translation

Posted By Iolanda Plescia, 14 hours ago
Updated: 14 hours ago

Taking its cue from Guyda Armstrong’s recent call for a ‘spatial turn’ in early modern translation studies (Intralinea, 2019, http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/towards_a_spatial_early_modern_translation_studies), this panel seeks to reframe issues of travel, transit and translation of people, texts, and cultural ideas between Italy, England and Ireland in the early modern period, conceived broadly to include the early years of the Royal Society (1476-1660). Ideas of space, place, geographical setting will be explored more fully in relation to the linguistic and cultural content of the texts and relationships under scrutiny.

 

In the hope of fostering interdisciplinary dialogue, the panel will welcome papers from a broad variety of scholarly viewpoints, including but not limited to linguistic, literary, cultural and historical studies. Panelists may explore travelling ideas, texts, individual translators, and are especially encouraged to reconstruct specific, and situated, networks within which Anglo-Italian translation and textual exchange were cultivated. 

 

Please email a 300-word proposals and a short CV to the panel organisers, Dr. Jane Grogan (jane.grogan@ucd.ie) and Dr. Iolanda Plescia (iolanda.plescia@uniroma1.it) by August 12, 2020. 

Tags:  Book History  Comparative Literature  England  English Literature  Geographies  History  Italian Literature  Literature  networks  Renaissance  translation  translational studies 

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Adapting Torquato Tasso: the legacy of La Gerusalemme liberata in visual arts, music, and theater

Posted By Luca Zipoli, 15 hours ago
Updated: 2 hours ago

“Adapting Torquato Tasso: the legacy of La Gerusalemme liberata in visual arts, music, and theater”

Organizer: Luca Zipoli (Scuola Normale Superiore), luca.zipoli@sns.it

Chair: Laura Benedetti (Georgetown University)

ABSTRACT:

Torquato Tasso encountered an extraordinary fortune between the end of the 16th and the beginning of the 18th thanks to his epic masterpiece, La Gerusalemme liberata (Jerusalem delivered). During the Renaissance and then the Baroque era, the poem was read, appreciated, and commented upon, but it also enjoyed many forms of adaptations through a vast range of visual arts and media, from illustrated printed editions to operas, from paintings and frescoes to theatrical plays. This panel aims to investigate, through a multidisciplinary and trans-cultural approach, this multidimensional phenomenon by examining some of the newly discovered and most relevant case studies of the legacy of La Gerusalemme liberata, from the Cinquecento up to c. 1700. The theoretical framework of this panel will be rooted in the up-to-date paradigms of the “adaptation studies” (e.g. Thomas Leitch et alii 2020, Linda Hutcheon 2013, Julie Sanders 2005), and we will seek to respond to some of these questions: which features made Tasso’s poem such a rich source for creative re-elaborations? What do the multifaceted appropriations of La Gerusalemme tell us about the Baroque aesthetics and the various cultures that inspired them? How can the studies on Tasso’s reception contribute to the general field of adaptation studies? The aim of this panel is to present scarcely known or neglected cases within the long tradition of adaptations from Tasso, while shedding a new light on more frequent themes through cutting-edge interpretations and a new theoretical benchmark.

This panel invites paper proposals which may include but are in no way limited to:

-          illustrated printed editions of La Gerusalemme liberata (e.g. the editions Castello 1590, 1604, and 1617, Ruffinelli 1607, and Tozzi 1628);

-          paintings, drawings, and artworks inspired by the epic poem (e.g. the cases of Annibale Carracci, Nicolas Poussin, and Antoon van Dyck);

-          theatrical, music, and operatic adaptations of Tasso’s masterpiece (e.g. the works by Giaches de Wert, Claudio Monteverdi, and Giulio Rospigliosi);

Please send paper proposals to Luca Zipoli (luca.zipoli@sns.it) by 10 August 2020. The submissions must include:

  • paper title (15-word maximum);
  • abstract (150-word maximum);
  • curriculum vitae (.pdf or .doc, no longer than 5 pages);
  • PhD completion date (past or expected; as per the RSA guidelines, PhD students must be ABD);
  • full name, current affiliation, and email address.

 Attached Files:

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Book History  Italian Literature  Music  Performing Arts and Theater  Print  Tasso  Visual Studies 

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Rubrics and Rubrication in Medieval and Early Modern Book Cultures

Posted By Jane F. Raisch, 18 hours ago

Despite the fact that rubrication is one of the most visible textual components on printed and manuscript pages - from ancient Egypt to the Islamic world - it remains one of the most undertheorized. Scholarly attention in recent decades has focussed on the many ways in which paratexts organize and convey information, especially how the margins afford a space in which the authority of the text is displaced and decentred. But current theories of authorship and of book history find it difficult to account for the textual power of rubrication, frequently seen as the sole-purview of medieval manuscripts. This panel will seek to correct this oversight by inviting papers on questions of rubrication and rubrics across late medieval and early modern books. Unlike the paratext, the rubric is often situated prominently within the body of the text, and yet clearly remains distinct from it. Standing apart from such authoriality, the rubric nonetheless profoundly inflects the reader’s encounter with the text in ways that have yet to be fully understood. This panel aims to deepen our understanding through an interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary exploration of rubrication from diverse cultural traditions.


Papers might explore:


  • The ways in which rubrics transition between manuscript and print

  • The rubric as title, and its role in attributing the text to a particular author

  • The changes in rubrication across multiple copies of the same text

  • Editing rubrics (in or from medieval/early modern texts)

  • Writing rubrics, and authorial rubrication

  • Reading rubrics, and the role of the reader

  • Rubrication and religious texts/confessional identities and rubrication

  • Sacred texts and the uses of red

  • Technical processes of rubrication across manuscript and print; scribal practices in the age of print; methods and processes of printing in red

  • How ornamental rubrication inflects the printed text 

  • Rubricated marginalia 

  • Rubrication and epigraphy/ rubrication and philology/ rubrication and scholarly practice 

Please email a 300-word proposals and a short CV to Dr Jane Raisch (jane.raisch@york.ac.uk) and Dr K P Clarke (kp.clarke@york.ac.uk) by August 12, 2020.

Tags:  Antiquarianism  Art History  Book History  Classical Tradition  Collecting  Comparative Literature  Education  English Literature  European literature  History of Technology  Material Culture  Materials and Materiality  pedagogy 

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Witchcraft and Demonology in the Art of Early Modern Europe

Posted By Hannah Segrave, Sunday, July 12, 2020

The visual language of witchcraft, developing in conjunction with the witch hunts in early modern Europe, has been considerably studied in the past three decades. As scholars have often noted, these images speak simultaneously to the artistic and the demonological. These works of art not only were inspired by or responded to cultural and legal notions but also served to shape understandings of both magical and artistic practices and practitioners. Not unlike the heterogeneity of witchcraft beliefs themselves, the images were varied and aimed for diverse purposes, from didactic and moral functions to entertainment and pure expressions of artistic fantasia


This panel invites papers that investigate how artists tackled ideas relating to witchcraft and demonology ca. 1400–1700, and what meanings viewers might have gleaned from these images. We aim to bring together scholars to discuss the role and signification of these images in order to delve into the range of the rhetorical power, artistic experimentation, and complex iconographies of this captivating subject matter.


Possible topics include, but are certainly not limited to:

- The role of artworks of witchcraft in artists’ careers 

- Visual language of witchcraft and its transmission throughout Europe

- Representations of unspecified or literary witches (mythology, the Bible, epic poems, etc.)

- Witchcraft imagery and demonology

- The devilish, the monstrous, and the fantastic 

- Patronage and collecting of witchcraft artworks

- Social, historical, cultural, artistic, and intellectual contexts of an image of witchcraft


Proposals must include:

- Paper title (15-word max) 

- Abstract (150-word max)

- Full name, current affiliation, and contact details

-  C.V. (up to 5 pages) 


Please submit proposals to Hannah Segrave (hsegrave@udel.edu) and Guy Tal (guy1tal1@hotmail.com) by August 10.


Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Demonology  Magic  Witchcraft 

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Andrew Marvell at 400

Posted By Katie Kadue, Friday, July 10, 2020
Updated: Friday, July 10, 2020

The Andrew Marvell Society invites paper proposals for a sponsored session.

We welcome papers on any topic relating to Marvell, including but not limited to his reception by modern poets; his representations and theorizations of power, inequality, and empire; his environmental thinking; theories of his lyric. 

To submit a proposal, please email an abstract (150 words) and C.V. to Joanna Picciotto (jpicciotto@berkeley.edu) and Katie Kadue (kadue@uchicago.edu) by August 10. 

Tags:  Ecocriticism  empire  English Literature  lyric 

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Renaissance Bergamo: At the Edge of the Venetian Terraferma

Posted By Emanuela Vai, Friday, July 10, 2020

Present day Bergamo is bifurcated into an  upper and lower portion of the city by the Venetian walls, built in 1561-1623 to discourage Milanese northward expansion, as well as to limit contraband trade. Bergamo was one of the most important of the strong points fortified by the Venetian state in the sixteenth century, through its position at the end of the chain in acting as the true shield of all the other cities, as one of its officials described. Resting among the foothills of the Bergamasque Alps, it lies a mere twenty-five miles northeast of the Spanish duchy of Milan. Under Venetian rule, Bergamo was the westernmost fortress town of the Venetian Republic’s terraferma empire. In addition to the Milan/Venice border, Bergamo sat at an important crossroads between the Venetian Republic, German lands north of the Alps, and other Italian city states. This begs the question, why is a location such as Bergamo, crucial as both an interregional communication point between the Venetian Republic and other parts of the Italian peninsula, largely side-lined in Renaissance and Early Modern studies?

 

Recent studies in Renaissance geopolitics have highlighted the important strategic role of liminal cities and their function in wider socio-political landscapes. To this end, this CFP invites paper proposals for a series of interdisciplinary panels from scholars working in musicology, art history, cultural history, book history and material and visual culture studies looking at Bergamo at the dawn of the early modern period. The aim is to rethink and reassess critical perspectives within Venetian Studies from the analysis of the Venetian state’s borders, with a view to an edited collection on the subject.

 

Topics could include/address, but are not limited to:

 

-   Architectural languages

-   Codicology

-   Confraternity studies

-   Education studies

-   Mediation and circulation of music

-   New technologies and historical research

-   Practices of patronage, collecting and selling art

-   Regionalism, mobility and cultural exchanges

-   War history

-   Women’s studies

 

As per RSA guidelines, proposals should be submitted in English and should include:

 

-   Paper title (15-word max)

-   Full name, current affiliation, and email address

-   Keywords (4 max)

-   Abstract (150-word max)

-   Short bio (150 words)

-   Short CV (2-page max)

 

Please send your proposal to Emanuela Vai (Worcester College, Oxford) and Jason Rosenholtz-Witt (Northwestern University, Chicago) by Wednesday, 5 August 2020:

emanuela.vai@worc.ox.ac.uk  

jasonkrw@gmail.com


Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Book History  Italian Renaissance Art  Italy  lay brotherhoods  lay sisterhoods  Music  Religious Studies  Renaissance Architecture  Urban Studies  Veneto  Visual Studies 

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Lists in Early Modern Women’s Writing: Life and Literature

Posted By Nikolina Hatton, Friday, July 10, 2020
Updated: Friday, July 10, 2020

Lists proliferate in texts written by women and texts written about women, from the typical enumeration of “women worthies” within the querelle des femmes tradition to the lists of possessions and household accounts found in early modern commonplace books. Within women’s writing itself, functional everyday lists and literary lists sometimes merge, such as in Isabella Whitney’s “The Maner of her Wyll”—a poetic description of and reflection on London in the form of a Last Will and Testament.  

This panel seeks to reflect on the forms and functions of the list within early modern women’s writings and everyday lives. Literary studies has seen a recent resurgence of interest in the list, as scholars have noted the list’s ability to bring together questions of functionality and literariness. Scholars have shown that, as a form that deceptively appears simpler than it really is, the list and examinations of it shed light on the evolution and manipulation of literary conventions and can further signal important discursive distinctions between texts that at first feel otherwise quite similar. Such a project intersects well with the study of women’s writing in the early modern period, not only because lists appear so often in investigations into women’s everyday lives, but also because the corpus of literature by women is generally marked by subtle but significant deviations within the genres deemed acceptable for women writers. In material culture studies as well, the list has been hailed as an affordance for accomplishing everyday tasks as well as a container that emphasizes metonymy and materiality over metaphorical meanings. This panel seeks to open up these questions by broadly investigating the use of the list within early modern women’s utilitarian and literary writings.

To submit a paper for consideration, please send your paper’s title (max 15 words), a short abstract (150 words), your CV, and institutional affiliation/contact details to Nikolina Hatton (n.hatton@lmu.de). A longer abstract may also be included in addition.

Tags:  Book History  Collecting  Comparative Literature  Daily Life  Diaries  Ekphrasis  English Literature  fiction  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Global Literature  History  interdiscplinary  Italian Literature  Libraries  Material Culture  Material Studies  Materiality  Memory Studies  networks  poetry  Portuguese Literature  Print  Spanish literature  Women and Gender 

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Literatures of Faith in the Early Modern Atlantic World

Posted By Alice Brooke, Friday, July 10, 2020

Literatures of Faith in the Early Modern Atlantic World

 

The politics of the early modern Atlantic World are inseparable from religion. Indeed, the role of Western Christianity, both Protestant and Catholic, in nation formation and colonial expansion across the Spanish, Portuguese, English, and French-speaking worlds is indisputable. In recent decades, however, increasing attention has been paid to the multi-faceted ways in which religious literary texts were used both to uphold and to question the political status quo. In particular, scholars have highlighted the importance of non-Christian religious voices in changing our understanding of the role of literary creation as a source of resistance to dominant political narratives. This panel invites proposals that explore in new ways this relationship between religious faith and literary creation throughout the Atlantic World. In what ways was religious literature used both to affirm and to resist imperial narratives? What impact did these texts have on wider discourses of nationalism, imperialism, and expansion? How did the lives of Jews, Muslims, and other religious minorities intersect with colonialist aims? How does a deeper understanding of the presence of non-Christian voices change how we understand the relationship between religion and politics in this period? What impact do these discourses continue to have on the place of religious communities in these regions in the present day?

 

Interested participants should send the following materials in a single document to alice.brooke@merton.ox.ac.uk  or imogen.choi@exeter.ox.ac.uk by August 7 2020:

 

- Paper title

- Abstract (no longer than 150 words)

- A single page CV

Tags:  Americas  British Empire  Comparative Literature  English Literature  eurocentrism  French Empire  French Literature  Geographies  Global Literature  Hispanic Literature  interdiscplinary  Missions  networks  Portuguese Empire  Portuguese Literature  Religion  Religious Studies  Spanish Empire  Spanish literature  theology 

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Reframing the Paragone: New Approaches to a Comparative Method of Artistic Analysis

Posted By Stefano Colombo, Thursday, July 9, 2020
Updated: Thursday, July 9, 2020

Scholars have dealt at great length with the notion of paragone from the early modern period onwards. In art criticism, paragone is a technical jargon generally used to refer to the similarity between two things (for example artistic media) through the act of comparison. Because it involves the analogy between one thing and another, paragone invokes a comparative meter through which artistic practice is judged or recognized. Significantly, art historians have often resorted to paragone to refer to the competition of the arts, most notably painting and sculpture or poetry and painting. Although this interpretation of paragone is not unsubstantiated, recent scholarship has clarified that the actual meaning of paragone is much broader (Dempsey 2009; van Gastel et al. 2014; Nygren 2017). Going beyond the quarrel over the nobility of the arts, paragone implies the dialogic mode of reasoning typical of a debate, where both sides of an argument are discussed by means of a disputation (Dempsey 2009). This interpretation, which traces its roots in classical rhetoric and was revived in the Renaissance, has reshaped the notion of paragone as the basis of formal academic debate which is fundamental to all the arts and sciences. 

 

This panel invites to reflect on paragone as a comparative method of visual analysis in the early modern period (ca. 1300-1700). In what ways does the flexible meaning of paragone help us reconsider the sources that laid the foundations of paragone itself, such as Benedetto Varchi or Leonardo da Vinci? Is paragone a fabrication of historiography, or was it already in effect in the Renaissance? Especially welcomed are papers that address paragone during Mannerism and the Baroque period. This is the moment when paragone entered the artistic debate of accademie, the learned societies whose members were erudite of various disciplines encompassing the visual arts, literature, law and philosophy. How did paragone influence artistic discourse in the accademie? And how did the exchange of ideas among members of these accademie inform on the production and reception of different art forms?Topics of interest might include but are not limited to: interaction among different media, in particular, sculpture, architecture and literature; ekphrasis and visual rhetoric; the extent to which artists (and their patrons) relied on technical, scientific or theological formulations and how these influenced the making and reception of artworks; or the analysis of the dialogic mode of paragone through the analogy between the liberal arts and other branches of knowledge, such as the natural sciences, medicine or theology.  

 

Please send an abstract (150-word maximum), a paper title (15-word maximum), 3-5 keywords, academic affiliation, PhD completion date (past or expected), a brief curriculum vitae, and any audio/visual requirements to Stefano Colombo (stefano.colombo.365@gmail.com) by August 1, 2020.

 

 

 

 

Tags:  Accademie  Art and Architecture  Art Theory  Classical Tradition  Ekphrasis  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Literature  Paragone  Philosophy  Renaissance Architecture  Rhetoric  Sculpture  Transmediality 

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Information and Loyalty Networks: Local Mediators in the Global Construction of Empires (16th century)

Posted By Ida Mauro, Thursday, July 9, 2020
Updated: Thursday, July 9, 2020

Session organized by Ida Mauro and Diego Sola, University of Barcelona.

Research group REDIF. Redes de información y fidelidad: los mediadores territoriales en la construcción global de la Monarquía de España (1500-1700).

The aim of this session is to attract papers to reflect on complex political systems (CPS) in the Early Modern Age, which were dominated by the convergence of multiple interests, and their need to gather information about their subjects from different sources. As a rule, local actors played an essential role in achieving the system’s political aims of integration and governance. The global expansion of the Spanish and Portuguese monarchies and of the Ottoman Empire in the 16th century, in which different institutions, social and economic practices, and political and religious traditions converged, demanded communication and information mechanisms to convey the necessary knowledge about both territories and people.

These local, political or religious, ‘agents’ were a sort of “transmission belt” between the court and its European, American, African and Asian territories; they defended local interests while delivering information about distant political and cultural contexts. They complemented the action of other political actors (such as viceroys, governors and superior councils) and provided a more direct means of communication between the subjects and the king. These local actors include a wide array of intellectuals, such as the humanist Mariangelo Accursio or the writer Giovan Battista Pino, who defended their cities’ interests at Charles V’s court; religious reformers, such as Diego de Salazar and José de Acosta, who connected distant territories in Asia, America and Europe with their ecclesiastical work during the reign of Philip II; or the missionaries Andrés de Urdaneta and Martín de Loyola, who connected peoples and experiences both within and outside the empire’s borders, also in the 16th century.

We welcome papers on local agents, both individuals and groups (secular or religious), which were active within the same territory, their role, networks, religious identity, production of texts and accounts. The aim of this session is to re-create the human and information-related dimension of a universe of local agents that constantly moved back and forth between their territories and decision-making centres.

Their essential role provides a new insight into Early Modern governance, which was based on the strategic action of territorial mediators, as well as to present Early Modern empires as a laboratory of knowledge in which the operation of territorial mediators played an essential role in the governance of different contexts and interests.

Please send proposals, including a 150-word abstract with your paper title, full name, current affiliation, and a short CV (up to 5 pages) by July 31th, 2020 to Dr. Ida Mauro idamauro@ub.edu and Dr. Diego Sola diegosola@ub.edu

For further information see the Renaissance Society of America meeting website: www.rsa.org/page/RSADublin2021

 Attached Files:

Tags:  Americas  China  Diaries  European history  Hispanic Literature  Jesuits  Missions  Nobility  Portuguese Literature  Religious Studies  Republic of Letters  Spanish Empire  Spanish literature  the courtier  translational imaginaries  trasnational studies 

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Experiencing Death in Early Modern Italy

Posted By Ariana Ellis, Thursday, July 9, 2020
Updated: Thursday, July 9, 2020

Death saturates early modern Italian culture, from Dance of Death artwork and religious scripture to elaborate execution processions and the scaffold literature they inspired. But what did it mean to experience death? How did it look, sound, and feel? Where did the boundaries between life and death truly lie?

 

This panel is seeking papers that explore what it meant to experience death in Italy at any point during the early modern period. Analytical perspectives including: the senses, the emotions, philosophy, memorial culture, death culture, and art history are all welcome.

 

Please send proposals to the organizer (ariana.ellis@mail.utoronto.ca) by July 27th. Paper proposals must include:

 

·      Abstract (150 word maximum)

·      Paper title (15 word maximum)

·      Full name, current affiliation, and email address

·      CV (.pdf or .doc; 5 page maximum)

·      Date of PhD or terminal degree completion

       (past or expected)

 

Selected applicants will be notified as soon as possible. Please note- you must renew or activate an RSA membership to participate in the conference.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  death and gender  Death studies  Digital Humanities  emotional history  Florence  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Italy  Memory Studies  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy  Sensory history  Sound studies  Urban Studies  Venice 

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Renaissance as a Matrix for Translational/Transnational Traditions and Imaginaries

Posted By Riccardo Raimondo, Wednesday, July 8, 2020
Updated: Thursday, July 9, 2020

The Renaissance is a crucible of literary trends and cultural imaginaries, which have influenced European culture to this day. In this context, the notion of translational tradition refers to a set of usages, cultural references, abstract or concrete knowledge, which characterize a homogeneous canon of translated texts from both a synchronic and diachronic perspective. It is therefore possible to consider most subsequent literary traditions from a translational and transnational point of view. Can we go further in modelizing these major Renaissance translational traditions when we examine the reception of early modern European literature in the following centuries?

The panel/roundtable will address the translational / transnational traditions emerging in the European Renaissance and their impact in the subsequent centuries. The panel/roundtable aims to address the following crucial issues and test hypotheses such as:

aIt is possible to identify specific translational/transnational traditions, in large part derived from the translational imaginaries developed in major Renaissance translations and other kinds of rewriting.

bSuch imaginaries became crystallized in the early modern period, and shape subsequent responses to major European masterpieces as well as literary trends.

cTranslations often embed and incorporate commentaries that influence the translational/transnational imaginaries and their ramifications.

 

Proposals should be submitted in English to the e-mail addresses below not later than the 10th of August 2020. Proposals should include:

- an abstract (150-word maximum);

- a paper title (15-word max.);

- a short bio-note (150 words);

- curriculum vitae (.pdf or .doc upload, no longer than 5 pages)

- full name, current affiliation, and e-mail address.

 

Selected candidates will be informed as soon as possible. The aim of the panel is to produce an edited collection (possible in open access format) addressing the notion of translational/transnational traditions from the perspective of “translational Renaissance studies”. All participants must renew or activate their RSA membership to participate in the conference.

 

Riccardo Raimondo

 (Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow, Université Montréal & University of Oslo)

 raimondo.riccardo@yahoo.it

 

Thomas Vuong

(Associate Researcher, Sorbonne Paris-Nord University)

ths.vuong@gmail.com

 Attached Thumbnails:

Tags:  Comparative Literature  translation  translational imaginaries  translational studies  trasnational studies 

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Early Modern Privacy?

Posted By Mette B. Bruun, Wednesday, July 8, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, July 8, 2020

Organizer: Centre for Privacy Studies, University of Copenhagen (www.teol.ku.dk/privacy)

 

Privacy is hardly a hallmark of Early Modern life. Rooms are crammed; beds are shared; doors are open; letters are copied; gossip runs wild; church and state survey the movements and mores of their subjects. Nonetheless, thresholds and boundaries do exist – be they material or immaterial ­– and they delineate spaces with regulated access, thus creating spaces with a particular potential for solitude, intimacy or a life without civic obligations.

In this panel, we will explore the terminologies, characteristics and ambience that pertain to Early Modern spaces of privacy. Perhaps such spaces are associated with terms related to ‘privacy’ or ‘the private’, and then it becomes a question how to identify the historical meaning of such terms. Perhaps such spaces are associated with emotions, activities or statuses that we think of as private or related to privacy, and it becomes a question how to avoid anachronism when dealing with them.

This panel is dedicated to spaces of privacy that are admired in poetry, explored in fiction, defined in legislation, identified in architectural plans, qualified in devotional treatises, represented in artworks, moulded in sermons or indicated in political theory. We are interested in spaces of privacy as they are built, furnished, adorned, portrayed, used, imagined, cultivated, restricted, protected, accessed, feared or lauded in the Early Modern period, and we are looking forward to learning more about scholarly approaches that enable us to grasp the complexities and historical particularities of such spaces.

To apply:

Please upload an abstract (150 words), a CV (3-5 pp) and, if relevant, a request for a travel bursary via this formhttps://teol.ku.dk/privacy/join-us/call-for-publications/panel-for-the-renaissance-society-of-america-conference-in-dublin-2021/panel/

Deadline 10 August

 

If you have questions, please contact Mette Birkedal Bruun, Professor of Church History at the University of Copenhagen and director of the Centre for Privacy Studies: mbb@teol.ku.dk

The speakers whose proposal are accepted will be expected to engage in a dialogue to enhance the cohesion of the panel.

 

Please note: Speakers must become RSA members by 1 November

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Book History  Closet Drama  Daily Life  Diaries  English Literature  Gardens  Italian Literature  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  piety  poetics  Renaissance Architecture  sexuality  social history  Visual Studies  Women and Gender 

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