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RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
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This blog is a space for RSA members to post calls for papers and lightning talks for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA Dublin 2021. Papers could be solicited for a traditional panel or a seminar session which will have pre-circulated papers.

To post a CfP, log in to your RSA account and select the "Add New Post" link further down this page. Make sure to include the organizer's name, email address, and a deadline for proposals. The session organizer is responsible for uploading the finalized proposal to the RSA Dublin 2021 submission site.

The general submission deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 is 15 August 2020. For more details on the submission process, see the Submission Guidelines page.

Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above. 

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Top tags: Art and Architecture  Art History  Italian Renaissance Art  History  English Literature  Women and Gender  Book History  Italian Literature  Medicine and Science  Visual Studies  Classical Tradition  Comparative Literature  Philosophy  Humanism  Material Culture  Religious Studies  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Religion  Rhetoric  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  Digital Humanities  Hispanic Literature  Associate Organizations  French Literature  history of science  interdiscplinary  Italy  Renaissance Architecture 

Servitude and Slavery in Spenser

Posted By Debapriya Sarkar, Friday, July 17, 2020

This panel seeks papers that bring Spenser’s writings into conversation with histories of servitude and slavery. Recent scholarship has begun to interrogate how discourses of race and race-making shape various aspects of Spenser’s poetry. This panel aims to expand on those conversations with a focus on the histories and legacies of slavery. What classical models of bondage and slavery does Spenser draw on? How might we talk of enslaved bodies in allegory? How might the varied discussions of servitude in the Spenserian corpus shed light on contemporary discourses and practices of enslavement? How might Spenser’s representations of colonialism and power help us think about the legacies of slavery in English poetry? Topics might include: race, gender, disability; activism and scholarship; genre; bondage and thralldom; history and legacy.

This is a guaranteed panel.

Please submit the following materials to Susanne Wofford and Debapriya Sarkar at issrsa2021@gmail.com by July 25 to be considered for inclusion: paper title; abstract (150-word maximum); 3-5 keywords; and a one-page abbreviated curriculum vitae (300-word maximum). Please note that RSA is very strict about word count: the system will not accept entries that go beyond the maximum limit.

Tags:  Associate Organizations  disability  empire  English Literature  gender  race  servitude  slavery  Spenser 

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Spenser and Environmental Thinking

Posted By Debapriya Sarkar, Sunday, July 5, 2020

This panel seeks papers that bring Spenser’s writings into conversation with twentieth- and twenty-first-century environmental writing. Recent scholarship has uncovered the centrality of what we would call ecocritical thinking in Spenser’s poetry. This panel aims to expand on those conversations by placing this sixteenth-century poetry directly in conversation with recent works of fiction and non-fiction. What can texts written in our current moment of ecological crisis reveal about early modern relations of nature and culture? How might Spenserian forms—allegory, pastoral, lyric—expand our understanding of the ways in which literary texts make intelligible the “unthinkable” aspects of the Anthropocene? Papers might consider: intersections of social, ecological, and racial justice; activism and scholarship; definitions of “nature,” “human,” and “nonhuman” across different historical periods; literary worldmaking; genres of environmental literature.

This is a guaranteed panel.

Please submit the following materials to Susanne Wofford and Debapriya Sarkar at issrsa2021@gmail.com by July 25 to be considered for inclusion: paper title; abstract (150-word maximum); 3-5 keywords; and a one-page abbreviated curriculum vitae (300-word maximum). Please note that RSA is very strict about word count: the system will not accept entries that go beyond the maximum limit.

Tags:  Associate Organizations  Ecocriticism  English Literature  History of Science  interdiscplinary  Medicine and Science  Spenser 

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Renaissance Conference of Southern California CFP for RSA 2021

Posted By Sophia Q. McCabe, Friday, June 19, 2020

Call for Panel Proposals
Renaissance Society of America Conference
Dublin, Ireland, 7–10 April 2021
Renaissance Conference of Southern California (RCSC)-Sponsored Panels

As an Associate Organization of the Renaissance Society of America, RCSC will be sponsoring one session at next year’s RSA conference in Dublin (7–10 April 2021). We seek proposals for complete panels on any subject of the Renaissance world. Please see the details below about what is expected to propose a panel, or consult the RSA website. Per RSA rules, graduate students are permitted on panels, but they must be within 1-2 years of defending their dissertations.

Please be advised that all participants in the RSA conference are responsible for their own costs associated with travel, lodging, and registration, and must become members of the Renaissance Society of America. Participants in an RCSC-sponsored panel should also be members of RCSC.

The deadline for consideration is 30 July 2020. Please send your submission (the panel proposal and the information about each paper presenter) to the current RCSC president (barbara.mello@csulb.edu).

For a Panel proposal, you will need:

  • panel title
  • panel abstract (250 words maximum)
  • panel keywords
  • a/v requests
  • panel chair
  • respondent (optional)
  • general discipline (History, Art History, Literature, or other)

Each paper presenter must provide:

  • paper title
  • paper abstract (150-word maximum)
  • curriculum vitae (.pdf or .doc upload) (300-word maximum)
  • Ph.D. completion date (past or expected)
  • full name, current affiliation, and email address

Download File (PDF)

Tags:  Associate Organizations  interdiscplinary 

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Architecture for the Common Good

Posted By Elizabeth M. Merrill, Thursday, June 11, 2020

During the recent health crisis, individuals across the globe have yielded to the intrusive politics of public authorities in the attempt to secure public health. Governing bodies highly controlled the movement and activities of their citizens, instructing them to stay at home, preventing them from meeting with friends and family members, sitting in parks, shopping and eating in restaurants. These intrusions on private liberties – and the questions they provoked from individuals as to accept them or not – brought back a central theme of political theory: that of the common good.

Since antiquity, the idea of the common good has problematized the shared political and social goal of communal well-being, which might or might not be in conflict with private interests. How to obtain this common good, in relation to private interests, recurs as an important question throughout the history of political theory. In these discussions, architectural patronage and design appear as important contributing factors in the obtainment of the common good. Architecture, urban planning and infrastructure development also incorporate innumerable tensions that exist between public and private interests.

This session invites papers that explore the “Architecture for the Common Good” in the Renaissance. Papers might focus on a primary-source text, examining the contribution of architecture to the public good. They might also present an architectural, urban or infrastructural project that hopes to contribute to the well-being of the community. Papers that specifically address the tensions that existed between public and private interests and that might have informed architectural patronage or design are likewise welcome.   

Please send proposals by 1 August 2020 via email with the subject line “RSA 2021” to Nele De Raedt (nele.deraedt@ugent.be) and Elizabeth Merrill at (elizabethmerrill11@gmail.com). The proposal should include a title (15 words max.); an abstract (200 words max.); and a one-paragraph CV (in prose, 200 words max.). Provide also full name, current affiliation, and email address.

This session is sponsored by the European Architectural Histories Network.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Associate Organizations  Classical Tradition  Italian Renaissance Art  Medicine and Science  Visual Studies 

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Renaissance Architecture in the Archives

Posted By Elizabeth M. Merrill, Thursday, June 11, 2020

 

For the purist, to know a building is to experience it first-hand, sensorily – to see its forms, to hear its echoes, to touch its surfaces, and to feel its spaces. Of course, history does not always allow for this full experience. For buildings of the early modern period – few of which survive, and even fewer, if any, in their “original” form – the historian must rely on “secondary” sources: drawings, commentaries and treatises, correspondence records, and contracts. It’s from the archives that the great histories of the Renaissance Europe’s iconic constructions unfold: the Duomo of Florence, St. Peter’s Basilica, the Royal Palace of Amsterdam, the Royal Site of El Escorial, the numerous palaces of merchant princes. The study of architecture through the archives likewise unveils works that would otherwise be invisible: constructions and monuments, long ago destroyed; ephemeral designs and stage scenery; unrealized feats of engineering; legal disputes; and theoretical debates. It’s in the archives that we also learn the extraordinary tales of the unsung protagonists of building design.   

 

For centuries, the archives of Renaissance architecture were largely fixed and immobile, providing scholars with a wealth of information – at times, electrifying, at times, terribly banal – of the history of the built environment. Yet the archives have evolved, slowly over the course of the twentieth century, and increasingly so in recent years. New technologies have changed how documents are located and accessed. Drawings, manuscripts and rare printed sources have not only been digitalized, but have also been made Open Access. Within the archive, scanning devices and cell-phone cameras allow the historian to assemble years’ worth of data in a single afternoon. Off-site, computer software facilitates the processes of cataloguing documents, and even their transcription and translation. Where previously extensive time, training, resources and patience were necessary to access the precious records of Renaissance architecture, now these treasures can be easily retrieved by even the casual researcher in a distant locale.

 

The changing nature of the archive introduces exciting new opportunities, but also caveats and questions. It’s clear that the virtual world is no real substitute for first-hand exploration: the accidental discoveries in the library or archive; the feel and sight of a drawing, manuscript or book; the shadows, the light, the sense of a place. For this panel, we invite papers that examine the “architecture in the archives” in its many forms and meanings. Papers might consider different archival sources and the light they shed on architectural history.  We welcome submissions that point to new directions in archival research or highlight recent findings. Papers might also reconsider or “re-read” published documents. We are equally interested in submissions that address research methodologies and the challenges brought about by new technologies.

 

Please send proposals by 1 August 2020 via email with the subject line “RSA 2021” to Nele De Raedt (nele.deraedt@ugent.be) and Elizabeth Merrill at (elizabethmerrill11@gmail.com). The proposal should include a title (15 words max.); an abstract (200 words max.); and a one-paragraph CV (in prose, 200 words max.). Provide also full name, current affiliation, and email address.

 

This session is sponsored by the European Architectural Histories Network.


Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Associate Organizations  Digital Humanities  Italian Renaissance Art  Visual Studies 

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Spenser, Milton, Ireland

Posted By Debapriya Sarkar, Friday, June 5, 2020
Updated: Monday, July 20, 2020

The Milton Society of America and the International Spenser Society are jointly sponsoring a panel for RSA 2021 on "Spenser, Milton, Ireland." What insights and methodologies emerge from triangulating these points? Possible angles of approach: How does Milton's reading of Spenser engage Spenser's deployments of Ireland? How does Ireland (or "Ireland") play into each writer's generic repertoires? In what ways do early-modern English dis/figurations of Ireland subtend elements of the two writers' oeuvres?

Proposals treating both writers especially welcome; papers on one of the two may also be accepted if they felicitously dovetail with other submissions. This is a guaranteed session.

Proposals should include the following, and should be sent to susanne.wofford@nyu.edu and lauren.shohet@villanova.edu by July 30: paper title (15-word maximum), abstract (150-word maximum), curriculum vitae (no longer than 5 pages), PhD or other terminal degree completion date (past or expected), full name, current affiliation, and email address.

Note that the RSA stipulation that individuals present no more than 1 paper applies to papers rolled over from RSA 2020.

Tags:  Associate Organizations  English Literature  Ireland  Milton  Spenser 

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Call for Papers: The Long History of the French Early Modern Pamphlet

Posted By Elisa Jones, Tuesday, June 2, 2020

The Renaissance Society of America, Dublin, April 7–10, 2021

Submission Deadline: July 3, 2020

Recent scholarship in the history of the book and reading practices has emphasized the need for a more comprehensive and interdisciplinary investigation of ephemeral print and premodern reading practices. Often seen as ‘the crowd made text’, pamphlets were at once individual items conveying specific messages, and contributory parts to broader movements. They were objects designed to reach a large audience that were engaged with individual readers. Although many have survived down to the present day, we are aware that even more have been lost.

The history of the so-called French political pamphlet as both a material form and cultural object over the course of the early modern period offers a unique opportunity to address the complex and overlapping motivations for writing, publishing, buying, engaging with and keeping pamphlets. In a session planned for RSA Dublin 2021, “The Long History of the French Pamphlet” proposes to explore the printed pamphlet as a material and cultural object in France from the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries. Papers that place French pamphlets in a larger comparative frame, or that focus on the material study, use, or reading practices of pamphlets, are encouraged, as are papers that approach new methodologies in pamphlet studies. Proposals from all disciplines are encouraged.

The session is sponsored by the Newberry Library's Center for Renaissance Studies, and is a part of its larger project of expanding the time frame of the Newberry Library’s French Pamphlets Digital Initiative and re-creating it as a research and pedagogical resource in cooperation with a network of scholars interested in the pamphlet as a form. This resource includes over 38,000 digitized French pamphlets from the sixteenth century to the French Revolution, and is free to the public online. The results of these conversations will be made available as a part of this digital resource with author attribution, further widening the conversation of pamphlet studies. For this reason, if Covid-19 prevention measures affect RSA 2021 scheduling, the session will be held virtually.

To apply, please send a 150-word abstract and short CV to co-organizers Elisa J. Jones (jonese@newberry.org), 2019–20 CRS Postdoctoral Fellow and Assistant Professor of History at the College of Charleston, and Sara Barker (S.K.Barker@leeds.ac.uk), Associate Professor of History at the University of Leeds, by Friday, July 3, 2020.

Tags:  Associate Organizations  Book History  Comparative Literature  French Literature  Rhetoric 

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Call for Papers: Sidney Circle at RSA Dublin 2021

Posted By The International Sidney Association, Tuesday, May 19, 2020

Deadline: 1 August 2020

The International Sidney Association plans to sponsor four new sessions at the 66th Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America in Dublin. We invite papers on any and all topics related to Philip Sidney, Mary Sidney Herbert, Lady Mary Wroth, the Sidney Family or the Sidney Circle generally. That Circle is conceived broadly, and hence we would welcome papers not only about Fulke Greville, Samuel Daniel, and William Herbert, but also papers about Giordano Bruno, Veronica Franco, Philippe Duplessis-Mornay, Justus Lipsius, and any number of figures in the Circle’s large cosmopolitan network.

We would be particularly happy to receive paper proposals on (but not limited to) the following topics:

  • The Sidneys in Ireland
  • Women Writers of the Sidney Circle
  • Politics, History, Religion in the Sidney Circle
  • Philip Sidney and the Early Moderns Post-1586 (Sidney and Shakespeare, or Sidney and Spenser, or Herbert or Donne or Daniel or Drayton, etc.)

Proposals should include an abstract (no longer than 150 words), a brief academic C.V. (not longer than 300 words). Indicate too whether you will require A.V. equipment for the presentation. Please email your proposals to Rob Stillman (rstillma@utk.edu) by 1 August 2020.

PS—In addition, the International Sidney Association plans to offer several more panels originally planned for RSA 2020 in Philadelphia. Participants on those panels should contact me for more information.

Tags:  Associate Organizations  English Literature  Performing Arts and Theater 

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