This website uses cookies to store information on your computer. Some of these cookies are used for visitor analysis, others are essential to making our site function properly and improve the user experience. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Click Accept to consent and dismiss this message or Deny to leave this website. Read our Privacy Statement for more.
Print Page   |   Sign In   |   Register
RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
Blog Home All Blogs

This blog is a space for RSA members to post calls for papers and lightning talks for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA Dublin 2021. Papers could be solicited for a traditional panel or a seminar session which will have pre-circulated papers.

To post a CfP, log in to your RSA account and select the "Add New Post" link further down this page. Make sure to include the organizer's name, email address, and a deadline for proposals. The session organizer is responsible for uploading the finalized proposal to the RSA Dublin 2021 submission site.

The general submission deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 is 15 August 2020. For more details on the submission process, see the Submission Guidelines page.

Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above. 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: Art and Architecture  Art History  Italian Renaissance Art  History  English Literature  Women and Gender  Book History  Italian Literature  Medicine and Science  Visual Studies  Classical Tradition  Comparative Literature  Philosophy  Humanism  Material Culture  Religious Studies  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Religion  Rhetoric  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  Digital Humanities  Hispanic Literature  Associate Organizations  French Literature  history of science  interdiscplinary  Italy  Renaissance Architecture 

Literatures of Faith in the Early Modern Atlantic World

Posted By Alice Brooke, Friday, July 10, 2020

Literatures of Faith in the Early Modern Atlantic World

The politics of the early modern Atlantic World are inseparable from religion. Indeed, the role of Western Christianity, both Protestant and Catholic, in nation formation and colonial expansion across the Spanish, Portuguese, English, and French-speaking worlds is indisputable. In recent decades, however, increasing attention has been paid to the multi-faceted ways in which religious literary texts were used both to uphold and to question the political status quo. In particular, scholars have highlighted the importance of non-Christian religious voices in changing our understanding of the role of literary creation as a source of resistance to dominant political narratives. This panel invites proposals that explore in new ways this relationship between religious faith and literary creation throughout the Atlantic World. In what ways was religious literature used both to affirm and to resist imperial narratives? What impact did these texts have on wider discourses of nationalism, imperialism, and expansion? How did the lives of Jews, Muslims, and other religious minorities intersect with colonialist aims? How does a deeper understanding of the presence of non-Christian voices change how we understand the relationship between religion and politics in this period? What impact do these discourses continue to have on the place of religious communities in these regions in the present day?

Interested participants should send the following materials in a single document to alice.brooke@merton.ox.ac.uk or imogen.choi@exeter.ox.ac.uk by August 7 2020:

  • Paper title
  • Abstract
  • A single page CV

Tags:  Americas  British Empire  Comparative Literature  English Literature  eurocentrism  French Empire  French Literature  Geographies  Global Literature  Hispanic Literature  interdiscplinary  Missions  networks  Portuguese Empire  Portuguese Literature  Religion  Religious Studies  Spanish Empire  Spanish literature  theology 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

The Renaissance Gallery

Posted By Andrea M. Gáldy, Wednesday, June 17, 2020

Call for Papers

Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting

Dublin, 7-10 April 2021

International Forum Collecting & Display

The Renaissance Gallery

Ever since the ground-breaking publications by Wolfram Prinz (1970) and Rosalys Coope (1986), the renaissance gallery has been investigated by art historians and historians of collecting as an architectural setting, as well as a room for display. The focus has been either on the general phenomenon or on individual case studies. Quite different from our modern perception of the gallery as a museum space for paintings or a commercial space used for trading in art, during the Renaissance, a gallery fulfilled a wider range of functions and displayed a much more diverse group of items than they do today.

Renaissance galleries were coveted by many but only owned by the nobility, males and occasionally females. Aristocratic owners displayed items that were in keeping with a particular collectors’ standard in close proximity to other collecting rooms such as libraries and armouries. Some galleries had a themed display that went hand in hand with a decorative programme devised by owner and court artists. Our sessions will therefore focus on different uses of the gallery, changes in terminology and architectural evolution. We are also interested in galleries created for women.

We invite proposals that present new approaches to issues of room type, diverse development, function, set-up, decoration and contents in a pan-European context, as well as with the gallery’s potential role for museology and museum displays.

If you wish to participate, please send your abstracts of 250 words and short bios (no CVs) by 15 July 2020 to collecting_display@hotmail.com.

Download File (DOCX)

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  British Empire  Classical Tradition  Digital Humanities  Italian Renaissance Art  Material Culture  Material Studies  Women and Gender 

Share |
Permalink
 

Intersecting Practices: Architecture and the Visual Arts c. 1300- c. 1700

Posted By Livia Lupi, Tuesday, June 16, 2020

Architectural structures are often a prominent feature in narrative images. They create striking settings, or are themselves the main subject of representation, from wood inlays to sculpted reliefs, from frescoes to panel and oil paintings, from illuminations and scroll paintings to print. They engage with the narrative whilst also providing a narrative of their own, as they testify to the architectural imagination of artists and communicative ability of architectural forms.

Yet, two-dimensional buildings are often discussed only as spatial devices articulating depth, and as lesser counterparts of large-scale three-dimensional structures. This approach hinders our understanding of the structural and ornamental ambition of many two-dimensional buildings, which can present architectural solutions that were adopted only decades later in built structures. It also prevents us from fully recognising the cultural value attached to architectural forms and their rhetorical dimension.

These sessions aim to challenge traditional approaches to the representation of architecture in the visual arts in order to bridge the historiographical gap between art and architectural history, as well as furthering research on the intersection of artistic and architectural practice. Whilst focussed on the period between c. 1300 to c. 1700, the sessions intend to explore the topic from a broad geographical and cultural perspective. Therefore, proposals exploring material in any medium from any part of the world are welcome. Papers may address a variety of topics, including but not limited to: 

  • Interaction and exchange between artists and architects
  • Craftsmen working as both artists and architects
  • The roles architecture plays within a narrative image
  • The symbolism of architecture
  • The relationship between representation of architecture and built structures
  • The development of architectural project drawing in relation to painted and sculpted buildings
  • Ornamental originality and structural ingenuity in both two- and three-dimensional architecture

Please send proposals to Livia Lupi (livia.lupi@warwick.ac.uk) by 31 July 2020. They should include a title (max. 15 words), an abstract (max. 150 words) and the candidate's brief CV (max. one page).

Tags:  Africa  Art and Architecture  Art History  Asia  British Empire  Rhetoric  Spanish Empire 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Women Religious and the Project of Empire

Posted By Alexandra C. Verini, Friday, June 12, 2020

In recent decades, increasing attention has been paid to the political and literary contributions of early modern nuns. Such research has ably demonstrated that, despite mandates of enclosure, Catholic women religious were active in the world, playing key roles in political resistance, in nation formation and in colonial expansion. Seeking to expand this research geographically and temporally, this panel invites new work on the engagement of early modern women religious across the globe, whether as collaborators or resisters, in colonialist and imperialist projects and in their afterlives. How were the lives of women religious whether in the Spanish New World or in New France entangled with colonialist aims? How do the traces of institutions started by early modern women, such as Mary Ward’s Loreto Institute, emerge within the British Empire? What might reading Catholic women’s religious orders alongside imperialism and colonialism reveal about the intersection between religion and politics in the early modern period and beyond? What impact did these women’s communities have on religious, pedagogical, and nationalist agendas within the project of empire and its aftermaths? 

Interested participants should send the following materials in a single document to alexandra.verini@ashoka.edu.in by July 31st:

  • Paper title
  • Abstract (no longer than 150 words)
  • A single page CV

**All speakers must become RSA members before the conference. In addition, because this is being submitted for consideration as a sponsored panel, all accepted speakers must also become members of the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women and Gender.

Tags:  British Empire  French Empire  History  Portuguese Empire  Religious Studies  Spanish Empire  Women and Gender 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Membership Software Powered by YourMembership  ::  Legal