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RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
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This blog is a space for RSA members to post calls for papers and lightning talks for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA Dublin 2021. Papers could be solicited for a traditional panel or a seminar session which will have pre-circulated papers.

To post a CfP, log in to your RSA account and select the "Add New Post" link further down this page. Make sure to include the organizer's name, email address, and a deadline for proposals. The session organizer is responsible for uploading the finalized proposal to the RSA Dublin 2021 submission site.

The general submission deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 is 15 August 2020. For more details on the submission process, see the Submission Guidelines page.

Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above. 

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Top tags: Art and Architecture  Art History  Italian Renaissance Art  History  English Literature  Women and Gender  Book History  Italian Literature  Medicine and Science  Visual Studies  Classical Tradition  Comparative Literature  Philosophy  Humanism  Material Culture  Religious Studies  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Religion  Rhetoric  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  Digital Humanities  Hispanic Literature  Associate Organizations  French Literature  history of science  interdiscplinary  Italy  Renaissance Architecture 

Figures of Polyglossia in British Early Modern Culture

Posted By Agnes Lafont, Monday, July 20, 2020
Updated: Monday, July 20, 2020

This panel, which is part of the “Translation and Polyglossia” project (https://tape1617.hypotheses.org/), wishes to explore ways in which polyglossia is inscribed textually as well as pictorially in early modern books, manuscripts, pamphlets, and other ephemera. It aims at investigating how common European knowledge was not only translated but adapted and naturalized in English book history. Emblems, woodcuts, engravings, broadsheets, dictionaries, and annotated or edited material in which several languages are co-present on the page may serve as examples. How was polyglossia made visible and marketed in early modern Britain? How did the figuration of polyglossia help transmit knowledge in a specific manner?

The study of the representation of polyglossia will interrogate:

  • The respective roles of various languages on the page
  • The different relationships to auctoritas that the use of a language other than English may induce (through the use of quotations, the reuse of engravings and woodcuts, etc.)
  • The functioning of a moving hermeneutics by an author (who imagines her or his text in various languages), by a reader (who annotates or makes comments in the margins)
  • The sociology of milieus who are conversant in several languages, have a shared erudition, use coded language, hieroglyphs...

Topics for consideration include:

  • annotated books and manuscripts
  • emblem books
  • polyglot dictionaries
  • polyglot documents produced by women
  • documents of performance
  • broadside ballads
  • pamphlets, periodicals, and ephemera

All types of documents may be brought to the discussion as long as they circulated in the British Isles in the early modern period, including books not printed in England but with attested circulations.

Please submit the following materials to organizers Agnès Lafont (agnes.lafont@univ-montp3.fr) and Laetitia Sansonetti (l.sansonetti@parisnanterre.fr) by August 7th to be considered for inclusion: paper title (15 words maximum); abstract (150 words maximum); 3-5 keywords; and a one-page abbreviated curriculum vitae (300 words maximum). Please note that RSA is very strict about word count: the system will not accept entries that go beyond the maximum limit.

Tags:  Book History  Comparative Literature  Emblems  English Literature  European literature  Literature  Material Culture  Multilingualism  Print  translation 

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"Dante's Legacy in Renaissance Politics & Religion" (sponsored by Dante Society of America)

Posted By Aileen A. Feng, Monday, July 13, 2020
Updated: Monday, July 13, 2020

Organized by Erminia Ardissino (Università degli Studi di Torino), with Aileen A. Feng (University of Arizona; Dante Society of America's representative to RSA)

This panel intends to shed new, broader light on the use of Dante’s works in the religious turmoil of Renaissance Europe and the foundation of the early modern political world. While at the end of the fifteenth century in Florence the poet was wrongly believed to be the translator of seven penitential psalms and the author of a Credo, both of which were print successes running into several editions, his Comedy and political treatise De monarchia were later taken as examples of an anti-papal position, especially in the Reformed world and in heterodox circles. On the 700th anniversary of Dante's death, to be celebrated in 2021, this panel will explore the interpretation, editing, manipulation, and use of Dante’s writings in religious and/or political terms within the frame of European religious strife, when the poet’s ideas were used to support or attack various confessional identities. Moreover, we are interested in the use of his political works not only in religious controversies, but also in the process of founding a new political science as political autonomy from religion was sought.  In addition to papers focused on Italy, we particularly encourage projects dealing with the reception and interpretation of Dante outside of Italy, in other countries involved in religious reformation.

On or before 1 August 2020, please send the following documents/information to Erminia Ardissino (erminia.ardissino@unito.it) and Aileen A. Feng (aafeng@arizona.edu):

  • full name, current academic affiliation, and email address
  • PhD completion date (past or expected)
  • paper title (15-word maximum)
  • abstract (150-word maximum)
  • curriculum vitae (5 pages, maximum)
  • A / V needs

Tags:  Comparative Literature  Italian Literature  Legal and Political Thought  Religion  Religious Studies 

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Early modern Anglo-Italian encounters: reframing travel, transit and translation

Posted By Iolanda Plescia, Monday, July 13, 2020
Updated: Monday, July 13, 2020

Taking its cue from Guyda Armstrong’s recent call for a ‘spatial turn’ in early modern translation studies (Intralinea, 2019), this panel seeks to reframe issues of travel, transit and translation of people, texts, and cultural ideas between Italy, England and Ireland in the early modern period, conceived broadly to include the early years of the Royal Society (1476-1660). Ideas of space, place, geographical setting will be explored more fully in relation to the linguistic and cultural content of the texts and relationships under scrutiny.

In the hope of fostering interdisciplinary dialogue, the panel will welcome papers from a broad variety of scholarly viewpoints, including but not limited to linguistic, literary, cultural and historical studies. Panelists may explore travelling ideas, texts, individual translators, and are especially encouraged to reconstruct specific, and situated, networks within which Anglo-Italian translation and textual exchange were cultivated.

Please email a 300-word proposals and a short CV to the panel organisers, Dr. Jane Grogan (jane.grogan@ucd.ie) and Dr. Iolanda Plescia (iolanda.plescia@uniroma1.it) by August 12, 2020.

Tags:  Book History  Comparative Literature  England  English Literature  Geographies  History  Italian Literature  Literature  networks  Renaissance  translation  translational studies 

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Rubrics and Rubrication in Medieval and Early Modern Book Cultures

Posted By Jane F. Raisch, Monday, July 13, 2020

Despite the fact that rubrication is one of the most visible textual components on printed and manuscript pages - from ancient Egypt to the Islamic world - it remains one of the most undertheorized. Scholarly attention in recent decades has focussed on the many ways in which paratexts organize and convey information, especially how the margins afford a space in which the authority of the text is displaced and decentred. But current theories of authorship and of book history find it difficult to account for the textual power of rubrication, frequently seen as the sole-purview of medieval manuscripts. This panel will seek to correct this oversight by inviting papers on questions of rubrication and rubrics across late medieval and early modern books. Unlike the paratext, the rubric is often situated prominently within the body of the text, and yet clearly remains distinct from it. Standing apart from such authoriality, the rubric nonetheless profoundly inflects the reader’s encounter with the text in ways that have yet to be fully understood. This panel aims to deepen our understanding through an interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary exploration of rubrication from diverse cultural traditions.

Papers might explore:

  • The ways in which rubrics transition between manuscript and print
  • The rubric as title, and its role in attributing the text to a particular author
  • The changes in rubrication across multiple copies of the same text
  • Editing rubrics (in or from medieval/early modern texts)
  • Writing rubrics, and authorial rubrication
  • Reading rubrics, and the role of the reader
  • Rubrication and religious texts/confessional identities and rubrication
  • Sacred texts and the uses of red
  • Technical processes of rubrication across manuscript and print; scribal practices in the age of print; methods and processes of printing in red
  • How ornamental rubrication inflects the printed text
  • Rubricated marginalia
  • Rubrication and epigraphy/ rubrication and philology/ rubrication and scholarly practice

Please email a 300-word proposal and a short CV to Dr Jane Raisch (jane.raisch@york.ac.uk) and Dr K P Clarke (kp.clarke@york.ac.uk) by August 12, 2020.

Tags:  Antiquarianism  Art History  Book History  Classical Tradition  Collecting  Comparative Literature  Education  English Literature  European literature  History of Technology  Material Culture  Materials and Materiality  pedagogy 

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Lists in Early Modern Women’s Writing: Life and Literature *extended deadline*

Posted By Nikolina Hatton, Friday, July 10, 2020
Updated: Monday, August 3, 2020

Lists proliferate in texts written by women and texts written about women, from the typical enumeration of “women worthies” within the querelle des femmes tradition to the lists of possessions and household accounts found in early modern commonplace books. Within women’s writing itself, functional everyday lists and literary lists sometimes merge, such as in Isabella Whitney’s “The Maner of her Wyll”—a poetic description of and reflection on London in the form of a Last Will and Testament.  

This panel seeks to reflect on the forms and functions of the list within early modern women’s writings and everyday lives. Literary studies has seen a recent resurgence of interest in the list, as scholars have noted the list’s ability to bring together questions of functionality and literariness. Scholars have shown that, as a form that deceptively appears simpler than it really is, the list and examinations of it shed light on the evolution and manipulation of literary conventions and can further signal important discursive distinctions between texts that at first feel otherwise quite similar. Such a project intersects well with the study of women’s writing in the early modern period, not only because lists appear so often in investigations into women’s everyday lives, but also because the corpus of literature by women is generally marked by subtle but significant deviations within the genres deemed acceptable for women writers. In material culture studies as well, the list has been hailed as an affordance for accomplishing everyday tasks as well as a container that emphasizes metonymy and materiality over metaphorical meanings. This panel seeks to open up these questions by broadly investigating the use of the list within early modern women’s utilitarian and literary writings.

To submit a paper for consideration, please send your paper’s title (max 15 words), a short abstract (150 words), your CV, and institutional affiliation/contact details to Nikolina Hatton (n.hatton@lmu.de) by 10 August 2020. A longer abstract may also be included in addition.

Tags:  Book History  Collecting  Comparative Literature  Daily Life  Diaries  Ekphrasis  English Literature  fiction  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Global Literature  History  interdiscplinary  Italian Literature  Libraries  Material Culture  Material Studies  Materiality  Memory Studies  networks  poetry  Portuguese Literature  Print  Spanish literature  Women and Gender 

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Literatures of Faith in the Early Modern Atlantic World

Posted By Alice Brooke, Friday, July 10, 2020

Literatures of Faith in the Early Modern Atlantic World

The politics of the early modern Atlantic World are inseparable from religion. Indeed, the role of Western Christianity, both Protestant and Catholic, in nation formation and colonial expansion across the Spanish, Portuguese, English, and French-speaking worlds is indisputable. In recent decades, however, increasing attention has been paid to the multi-faceted ways in which religious literary texts were used both to uphold and to question the political status quo. In particular, scholars have highlighted the importance of non-Christian religious voices in changing our understanding of the role of literary creation as a source of resistance to dominant political narratives. This panel invites proposals that explore in new ways this relationship between religious faith and literary creation throughout the Atlantic World. In what ways was religious literature used both to affirm and to resist imperial narratives? What impact did these texts have on wider discourses of nationalism, imperialism, and expansion? How did the lives of Jews, Muslims, and other religious minorities intersect with colonialist aims? How does a deeper understanding of the presence of non-Christian voices change how we understand the relationship between religion and politics in this period? What impact do these discourses continue to have on the place of religious communities in these regions in the present day?

Interested participants should send the following materials in a single document to alice.brooke@merton.ox.ac.uk or imogen.choi@exeter.ox.ac.uk by August 7 2020:

  • Paper title
  • Abstract
  • A single page CV

Tags:  Americas  British Empire  Comparative Literature  English Literature  eurocentrism  French Empire  French Literature  Geographies  Global Literature  Hispanic Literature  interdiscplinary  Missions  networks  Portuguese Empire  Portuguese Literature  Religion  Religious Studies  Spanish Empire  Spanish literature  theology 

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Renaissance as a Matrix for Translational/Transnational Traditions and Imaginaries

Posted By Riccardo Raimondo, Wednesday, July 8, 2020
Updated: Thursday, July 9, 2020

The Renaissance is a crucible of literary trends and cultural imaginaries, which have influenced European culture to this day. In this context, the notion of translational tradition refers to a set of usages, cultural references, abstract or concrete knowledge, which characterize a homogeneous canon of translated texts from both a synchronic and diachronic perspective. It is therefore possible to consider most subsequent literary traditions from a translational and transnational point of view. Can we go further in modelizing these major Renaissance translational traditions when we examine the reception of early modern European literature in the following centuries?

The panel/roundtable will address the translational / transnational traditions emerging in the European Renaissance and their impact in the subsequent centuries. The panel/roundtable aims to address the following crucial issues and test hypotheses such as:

aIt is possible to identify specific translational/transnational traditions, in large part derived from the translational imaginaries developed in major Renaissance translations and other kinds of rewriting.

bSuch imaginaries became crystallized in the early modern period, and shape subsequent responses to major European masterpieces as well as literary trends.

cTranslations often embed and incorporate commentaries that influence the translational/transnational imaginaries and their ramifications.

 

Proposals should be submitted in English to the e-mail addresses below not later than the 10th of August 2020. Proposals should include:

- an abstract (150-word maximum);

- a paper title (15-word max.);

- a short bio-note (150 words);

- curriculum vitae (.pdf or .doc upload, no longer than 5 pages)

- full name, current affiliation, and e-mail address.

 

Selected candidates will be informed as soon as possible. The aim of the panel is to produce an edited collection (possible in open access format) addressing the notion of translational/transnational traditions from the perspective of “translational Renaissance studies”. All participants must renew or activate their RSA membership to participate in the conference.

 

Riccardo Raimondo

 (Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow, Université Montréal & University of Oslo)

 raimondo.riccardo@yahoo.it

 

Thomas Vuong

(Associate Researcher, Sorbonne Paris-Nord University)

ths.vuong@gmail.com

 Attached Thumbnails:

Tags:  Comparative Literature  translation  translational imaginaries  translational studies  trasnational studies 

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Landscape and Italian Renaissance Books of Poetry

Posted By Jakub Koguciuk, Wednesday, July 1, 2020

This panel aims to bring a rarely considered set of material to the study of landscape : Renaissance books of poetry. The rise of independent landscape painting is a classic subject in the study of Renaissance art. The development of pictorial naturalism and single-point perspective, among others, led to vivid evocations of the visual world. In contrast, historians of the book such as Sachiko Kusukawa explore how books of the period engage with knowledge of nature in innovative ways. Italian poets of the period created new literary forms of conceptualizing nature: from experiments in the dolce stil novo to the revival of ancient pastoral. All of these forms of literature were presented to readers in the form of books.

This panel invites scholars working at the intersection of book history, literary studies and the history of art. Examples of “landscapes” featured in Renaissance books include but are not limited to full-page images such as frontispieces, designs in the margins, maps, city views, emblematic images and other figural representations of nature. We are also interested in how potential and imagined landscapes interact with the materiality of the book. Potential papers may focus on manuscripts as well as printed books within the long period of 1300 to 1600. We welcome all approaches to landscape, from studies rooted in the visual, the verbal and the codicological, as well as considerations rooted in environmental humanities and ecocriticism.

Interested participants should send a title, abstract of 250 words (with relevant images) and a CV to Zoe Langer, NEH Postdoctoral Fellow - The Digital Piranesi, Irvin Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, University of South Carolina (zlanger@mailbox.sc.edu) and Jakub Koguciuk (jakub.koguciuk@aya.yale.edu) by July 21st, 2020.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Book History  Comparative Literature  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Italy  Visual Studies 

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The Burden of Blood in Early Modern Spain

Posted By Amy E. Sheeran, Thursday, June 25, 2020

Although blood, as a symbol, has always been replete with meanings, in the context of early modern Spain, it becomes uniquely potent. This panel seeks to consider blood as a category of representational analysis, following the lead of Gil Anidjar and Joan Scott. In particular, within the context of the ideology of blood purity with its attention to blood’s content, origin, and legibility, representations of blood are evocative and layered. Recent attention to the history of blood purity statutes and their influence, as well as to the role of blood in shaping national, imperial, and religious identity in Spain, prompts further analysis of blood’s discursive potential in the early modern Iberian world. In this panel, we aim to consider how representational works approach and articulate the multilayered meanings blood allows in this context. We welcome interdisciplinary submissions focused on literary, historical, or visual works that consider medical and scientific knowledge; blood and its relation to race; the role of blood in signaling or establishing class; theological questions and debates; blood as a nexus of gender and sexuality, and other related concerns.

Please send abstracts (150-word length) with a proposed title (15-word maximum), keywords, and a brief CV to Amy Sheeran at sheeran1@otterbein.edu and Rachel Burk at rburk@ndm.edu by August 1.

Tags:  Comparative Literature  Hispanic Literature  interdiscplinary  Material Culture  Medicine and Science  Nobility  Religion  Spanish Empire  theology  Women and Gender 

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Continental Law and Early Modern Visual Culture

Posted By Hayley Cotter, Tuesday, June 16, 2020
Updated: Friday, June 19, 2020

This session aims to foster conversation about the relationship between Continental law (civil, canon, or Roman) and early modern visual culture. Chaired by Dr. Valérie Hayaert, it specifically probes how images of justice were adapted to conform to local custom in order to retain their effectiveness. However, any topic that addresses early modern European law and visual culture (including but not limited to painting, sculpture, book illustration, and public murals) is welcome and will be considered for inclusion on the panel.

Please send the following to Hayley Cotter (hcotter@umass.edu) by 15 July 2020:

  • Full name and current affiliation
  • Paper title (15-word max)
  • Paper abstract (150-word max)
  • Curriculum vitae (5-page max)
  • PhD completion date (past or expected)

Accepted panelists will be notified by 20 July 2020.

The panel is sponsored by the Kinney Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Book History  Comparative Literature  History  Legal and Political Thought  Visual Studies 

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Althusser's Renaissance

Posted By Martin Moraw, Saturday, June 13, 2020

Louis Althusser’s thought is receiving renewed attention in the humanities and social sciences. This session seeks to bring together scholars of various disciplines and specializations to explore the potential of a return to Althusser in the particular context of Renaissance/early modern studies. Contributions may reflect on Althusser’s writings on early modern figures, make use of Althusserian concepts to produce new readings of early modern texts, or engage relevant theoretical questions.

Topics may include: Althusser, Machiavelli, politics; Althusser, Galileo, science; Althusser, Spinoza, philosophy; structure, conjuncture, contradiction, overdetermination, uneven development; Althusser and theater; symptomatic reading; ideology, subjectivation; aleatory materialism, the encounter.

Please send proposals including a paper title, an abstract (200 words), and a one-paragraph CV to Martin Moraw (martin.moraw@aucegypt.edu) by July 31, 2020.

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Comparative Literature  English Literature  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Hispanic Literature  History  Italian Literature  Legal and Political Thought  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy 

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Jesuit Studies

Posted By Kathleen M. Comerford, Thursday, June 11, 2020

Call for Papers, Renaissance Society of America Conference, Dublin, Ireland, April 7-10, 2021

The Renaissance Society of America (RSA) is has announced that it will accept proposals for individual presentation proposals and complete panels for its 2021 annual conference, to be held April 7-10, 2021 in Dublin, Ireland.  The Journal of Jesuit Studies regularly sponsors up to five panels at this conference.  We are looking to organize panels in any aspect of Jesuit studies in any region, up to the year 1700.  (Please note: Sponsorship by the JJS does not guarantee acceptance to the program.)

Please submit abstracts on topics related to Jesuits on the subjects of: history, literary studies, art history, music history, or related topics, of no more than 150 words, along with a short list of keywords, and a BRIEF CV (no more than 300 words, including affiliation, rank and one or two important publications or other evidence of scholarship) to Kathleen Comerford, kcomerfo@georgiasouthern.edu, no later than August 1, 2020.  We will consider panels, individual papers, and roundtables for sponsorship by the Journal of Jesuit Studies.

Further information about the RSA, the Dublin conference, and the general Call for Papers is available at https://www.rsa.org/page/RSADublin2021.

 

Thank you.

Kathleen M. Comerford
Professor of History, Georgia Southern University

Download File (DOCX)

Tags:  Africa  Art and Architecture  Art History  Asia  Comparative Literature  Education  French Empire  History  Jesuits  Missions  Neo-Latin Literature  Philosophy  Portuguese Empire  Religious Studies  Spanish Empire 

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Patronage and innovation: how patronage shaped textual culture in the early modern world

Posted By Annet den Haan, Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Studying patronage is crucial for understanding the early modern world. Indeed, recent scholarship on patronage covers the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries, it studies countries as diverse as Italy and the Dutch Republic, and it focuses on artifacts ranging from scientific theses to funerary poems, from paintings to coins. Although scholars of patronage occasionally cross borders between countries, genres, or time periods, we believe we can bring scholarship a step further by comparing contexts systematically to uncover underlying mechanisms. In this panel, we focus on textual patronage, by which we mean patronage of clients (authors, editors, printers) who produce texts of any kind.

Bringing together case studies from various contexts allows us to explore our main question of how textual patronage relates to the client’s intellectual and artistic freedom, and hence to originality and innovation. In which cases are authors free to create something new? Does economic or social success lead to more autonomy? Is patronage a stimulus for innovation, or does it prevent authors from being innovative? In other words, is patronage limiting or liberating? The question of what causes innovation is one of the points of focus within the interdisciplinary field of the history of knowledge, and several tentative explanations have been suggested. By focusing on patronage relations, we add another perspective to this debate.

Our aim is to compare case studies of patronage across regions, periods, communities, ideologies, and genres, in order to draw tentative conclusions about patronage in relation to intellectual and artistic freedom. We invite speakers from literary studies as well as intellectual history and history of science to submit papers. We intend to make the panel a collaborative effort and would like to discuss in advance with all presenters which specific questions we will all answer, in order to systematically study the mechanisms of innovation in textual products of patronage.

Submission guidelines

Interested participants are invited to submit the following:

  • a 400-word abstract as well as a 150-word short version
  • a curriculum vitae, including full name, affiliation, and email address; max. 5 pages
  • paper keywords.

Please send all materials to Annet den Haan (a.denhaan@uu.nl) and to Nina Geerdink (n.geerdink@uu.nl). The deadline for submissions is 31 July 2020. Decisions on submissions will be sent out at least one week before the RSA submission deadline of 15 August 2020.

All participants in the Dublin conference (on site or virtual) must be members of the Renaissance Society of America. Please not that RSA rules allow a participant to present only one paper.

Tags:  Book History  Comparative Literature  English Literature  French Literature  Germanic Literature  Hispanic Literature  History  Humanism  Italian Literature  Medicine and Science  Music  Neo-Latin Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Philosophy  Women and Gender 

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Sponsored session: Poetry, Science, and Disciplinary Boundaries in the Italian Renaissance

Posted By Francesco Brenna, Tuesday, June 9, 2020
Updated: Tuesday, June 16, 2020

This will be a session sponsored by the disciplinary area of Italian Literature for the next Renaissance Society of America annual meeting (Dublin, Ireland, 7-10 April 2021). NB: there is the possibility that the RSA meeting will be held virtually: panelists should be prepared to present online.

This panel aims to examine how literary and scientific culture looked at each other in order to define their respective disciplinary limits in the Italian early modern period. How did literature react to the dawn of the new science? What precisely were the ways literature used to define its specific contribution to human learning? Was it able to delineate that which could only be learned through poems and fiction? How did science deal with the same issues when defining and placing itself within a system dominated by what we now call the humanities? To answer these questions, this panel invites papers on early modern Italian (or Italian-related) vernacular and Latin texts, including but not limited to:

  • theoretical texts (treatises on poetry, science, pedagogy, and commentaries on classical texts);
  • literary works conveying scientific notions of various kinds (e.g., pathology in Fracastoro's Syphilis sive de morbo gallico, geographical and hydrological information in Tasso's Gerusalemme liberata, and especially Gerusalemme conquistata, anatomy in Marino's Adone, and new inventions, observations on nature, and discoveries, such as those described in works by Daniello Bartoli and Giacomo Lubrano);
  • intellectuals whose output lies at the intersection of science, poetics, and philosophy, such as Galileo, Tesauro, Campanella, and Bruno.

Please send paper proposals to Francesco Brenna (fbrenna4@alumni.jh.edu) by 22 July 2020, including:

  • paper title (15-word maximum);
  • abstract (150-word maximum);
  • curriculum vitae (.pdf or .doc);
  • PhD completion date (past or expected; as per the RSA guidelines, PhD students must be ABD);
  • full name, current affiliation, and email address.

Decisions on submissions will be communicated soon after the deadline, and before the RSA submission deadline of 15 August 2020.

Tags:  Bartoli  Bruno  Campanella  Comparative Literature  Fracastoro  Galileo  Marino  Medicine and Science  pedagogy  Philosophy  poetics  poetry  Rhetoric  Tasso  Tesauro 

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Call for Papers: The Long History of the French Early Modern Pamphlet

Posted By Elisa Jones, Tuesday, June 2, 2020

The Renaissance Society of America, Dublin, April 7–10, 2021

Submission Deadline: July 3, 2020

Recent scholarship in the history of the book and reading practices has emphasized the need for a more comprehensive and interdisciplinary investigation of ephemeral print and premodern reading practices. Often seen as ‘the crowd made text’, pamphlets were at once individual items conveying specific messages, and contributory parts to broader movements. They were objects designed to reach a large audience that were engaged with individual readers. Although many have survived down to the present day, we are aware that even more have been lost.

The history of the so-called French political pamphlet as both a material form and cultural object over the course of the early modern period offers a unique opportunity to address the complex and overlapping motivations for writing, publishing, buying, engaging with and keeping pamphlets. In a session planned for RSA Dublin 2021, “The Long History of the French Pamphlet” proposes to explore the printed pamphlet as a material and cultural object in France from the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries. Papers that place French pamphlets in a larger comparative frame, or that focus on the material study, use, or reading practices of pamphlets, are encouraged, as are papers that approach new methodologies in pamphlet studies. Proposals from all disciplines are encouraged.

The session is sponsored by the Newberry Library's Center for Renaissance Studies, and is a part of its larger project of expanding the time frame of the Newberry Library’s French Pamphlets Digital Initiative and re-creating it as a research and pedagogical resource in cooperation with a network of scholars interested in the pamphlet as a form. This resource includes over 38,000 digitized French pamphlets from the sixteenth century to the French Revolution, and is free to the public online. The results of these conversations will be made available as a part of this digital resource with author attribution, further widening the conversation of pamphlet studies. For this reason, if Covid-19 prevention measures affect RSA 2021 scheduling, the session will be held virtually.

To apply, please send a 150-word abstract and short CV to co-organizers Elisa J. Jones (jonese@newberry.org), 2019–20 CRS Postdoctoral Fellow and Assistant Professor of History at the College of Charleston, and Sara Barker (S.K.Barker@leeds.ac.uk), Associate Professor of History at the University of Leeds, by Friday, July 3, 2020.

Tags:  Associate Organizations  Book History  Comparative Literature  French Literature  Rhetoric 

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