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RSA Dublin 2021 Calls for Papers
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This blog is a space for RSA members to post calls for papers and lightning talks for sessions in all disciplines to be held at RSA Dublin 2021. Papers could be solicited for a traditional panel or a seminar session which will have pre-circulated papers.

To post a CfP, log in to your RSA account and select the "Add New Post" link further down this page. Make sure to include the organizer's name, email address, and a deadline for proposals. The session organizer is responsible for uploading the finalized proposal to the RSA Dublin 2021 submission site.

The general submission deadline for RSA Dublin 2021 is 15 August 2020. For more details on the submission process, see the Submission Guidelines page.

Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CfPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above. 

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Top tags: Art and Architecture  Art History  Italian Renaissance Art  History  English Literature  Women and Gender  Book History  Italian Literature  Medicine and Science  Visual Studies  Classical Tradition  Comparative Literature  Philosophy  Humanism  Material Culture  Religious Studies  Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Religion  Rhetoric  Legal and Political Thought  Neo-Latin Literature  Digital Humanities  Hispanic Literature  Associate Organizations  French Literature  history of science  interdiscplinary  Italy  Renaissance Architecture 

Figures of Polyglossia in British Early Modern Culture

Posted By Agnes Lafont, Monday, July 20, 2020
Updated: Monday, July 20, 2020

This panel, which is part of the “Translation and Polyglossia” project (https://tape1617.hypotheses.org/), wishes to explore ways in which polyglossia is inscribed textually as well as pictorially in early modern books, manuscripts, pamphlets, and other ephemera. It aims at investigating how common European knowledge was not only translated but adapted and naturalized in English book history. Emblems, woodcuts, engravings, broadsheets, dictionaries, and annotated or edited material in which several languages are co-present on the page may serve as examples. How was polyglossia made visible and marketed in early modern Britain? How did the figuration of polyglossia help transmit knowledge in a specific manner?

The study of the representation of polyglossia will interrogate:

  • The respective roles of various languages on the page
  • The different relationships to auctoritas that the use of a language other than English may induce (through the use of quotations, the reuse of engravings and woodcuts, etc.)
  • The functioning of a moving hermeneutics by an author (who imagines her or his text in various languages), by a reader (who annotates or makes comments in the margins)
  • The sociology of milieus who are conversant in several languages, have a shared erudition, use coded language, hieroglyphs...

Topics for consideration include:

  • annotated books and manuscripts
  • emblem books
  • polyglot dictionaries
  • polyglot documents produced by women
  • documents of performance
  • broadside ballads
  • pamphlets, periodicals, and ephemera

All types of documents may be brought to the discussion as long as they circulated in the British Isles in the early modern period, including books not printed in England but with attested circulations.

Please submit the following materials to organizers Agnès Lafont (agnes.lafont@univ-montp3.fr) and Laetitia Sansonetti (l.sansonetti@parisnanterre.fr) by August 7th to be considered for inclusion: paper title (15 words maximum); abstract (150 words maximum); 3-5 keywords; and a one-page abbreviated curriculum vitae (300 words maximum). Please note that RSA is very strict about word count: the system will not accept entries that go beyond the maximum limit.

Tags:  Book History  Comparative Literature  Emblems  English Literature  European literature  Literature  Material Culture  Multilingualism  Print  translation 

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The 'I' in the Margins: Poetry, Memoirs, Letters and Paratexts by Reformed exiles

Posted By Clara Marías, Tuesday, July 14, 2020
Updated: Wednesday, July 15, 2020

In the last decades, increasing attention has been paid to the works written or translated by Reformed exiles during the 16th and 17th centuries. From a European perspective, the monographies published by the members of the research group EMoDiR are a good example, and on the Spanish reformed exiles, scholars such as Carlos Gilly, Massimo Firpo, Ignacio García Pinilla, Doris Moreno, James Amelang, or Rady Roldán-Figueroa have edited and studied several works, expanding our knowledge about them. However, these translations and original writings from Juan de Valdés, Francisco de Enzina, Juan Pérez de Pineda, Casiodoro de Reina, Antonio del Corro, Tomás Carrascón, Nicolás y Sacharles, among others, have been studied from the perspective of History or History of Religion, rather than as literary works and often without a focus on their self-fashioning perspective and the ideological and political intentions of the authors.

For this reason, this panel invites proposals from scholars interested in analyzing the poetry, memoirs, letters and paratexts (introductions, dedicatory epistles, etc.) from Reformed exiles, dealing with the manners in which the authors, far from their countries and often persecuted and in danger, living “in the margins”, presented their lives and ideas and their faith and conversion by means of various rhetorical strategies, including dissimulation, persuasion, fictionalization or confrontation.

The proposals should study works by reformed exiles from any European country with a Catholic majority during the Early Modern period, with a literary approach to the poetry, memoirs, letters, prologues and dedicatory epistles selected for discussion.

Interested participants should send the following in a single document to Clara Marías (cmarias@us.es) by August 7, 2020:

  • Paper title
  • A single page CV
  • Abstract (about 500 words)

Tags:  Cultural Networks  Diaries  emotional history  European history  European literature  exile  French Literature  Hispanic Literature  History  Humanism  Intellectual History  Italy  Literature  memoirs  Memory Studies  Networks  Philosophy  Portuguese Literature  Religion  Religious Studies  Rhetoric  self-fashioning  Spanish literature  translation 

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Rubrics and Rubrication in Medieval and Early Modern Book Cultures

Posted By Jane F. Raisch, Monday, July 13, 2020

Despite the fact that rubrication is one of the most visible textual components on printed and manuscript pages - from ancient Egypt to the Islamic world - it remains one of the most undertheorized. Scholarly attention in recent decades has focussed on the many ways in which paratexts organize and convey information, especially how the margins afford a space in which the authority of the text is displaced and decentred. But current theories of authorship and of book history find it difficult to account for the textual power of rubrication, frequently seen as the sole-purview of medieval manuscripts. This panel will seek to correct this oversight by inviting papers on questions of rubrication and rubrics across late medieval and early modern books. Unlike the paratext, the rubric is often situated prominently within the body of the text, and yet clearly remains distinct from it. Standing apart from such authoriality, the rubric nonetheless profoundly inflects the reader’s encounter with the text in ways that have yet to be fully understood. This panel aims to deepen our understanding through an interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary exploration of rubrication from diverse cultural traditions.

Papers might explore:

  • The ways in which rubrics transition between manuscript and print
  • The rubric as title, and its role in attributing the text to a particular author
  • The changes in rubrication across multiple copies of the same text
  • Editing rubrics (in or from medieval/early modern texts)
  • Writing rubrics, and authorial rubrication
  • Reading rubrics, and the role of the reader
  • Rubrication and religious texts/confessional identities and rubrication
  • Sacred texts and the uses of red
  • Technical processes of rubrication across manuscript and print; scribal practices in the age of print; methods and processes of printing in red
  • How ornamental rubrication inflects the printed text
  • Rubricated marginalia
  • Rubrication and epigraphy/ rubrication and philology/ rubrication and scholarly practice

Please email a 300-word proposal and a short CV to Dr Jane Raisch (jane.raisch@york.ac.uk) and Dr K P Clarke (kp.clarke@york.ac.uk) by August 12, 2020.

Tags:  Antiquarianism  Art History  Book History  Classical Tradition  Collecting  Comparative Literature  Education  English Literature  European literature  History of Technology  Material Culture  Materials and Materiality  pedagogy 

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Theatres of Knowledge: On the Theatricalisation of Scientific Practices

Posted By Oscar Seip, Tuesday, July 7, 2020
Updated: Monday, July 20, 2020

Studying the intertwined history of the theatre and the sciences is crucial to understand the development of different styles and strategies that developed during the Early Modern Period for the discovery and presentation of knowledge. Indeed, previous scholarship has studied the importance of the locality of the theatre to understand how scientific practitioners acquired and disseminated knowledge. While this has focused on the anatomy theatre, its impact beyond the field of medicine has received relatively little consideration. In this panel, we explore the anatomy theatre in relation to a broader vision of the world as a theatre.

Bringing together case studies from various contexts allows us to explore our main question of how the anatomy theatre relates to a hypothesised radical shift towards the theatricalisation of scientific practices. Did it lead to a new genre of printed works? Was it a new tool and practice of observing the world? Were these observations recorded and transmitted in a new and unique way?  How is the theatre different from contemporary metaphors such as the mirror and the book of nature? How does the theatre relate to the concepts of performance and spectacle? In other words, is there a distinctly theatrical style and strategy for the discovery and presentation of knowledge?

Our aim is to compare case studies of the theatre’s use across different periods (from the Early Modern period to the Enlightenment), fields of science or subjects (e.g. geography, medicine, architecture, mathematics), and different kinds of knowledge (practical or theoretical) and the different styles and strategies that they employ to represent this knowledge (figural/pictorial or abstract and textual). Particular attention will be given in this to the translation from the (imaginative) mental and physical space of the theatre to the space of the page.

We invite speakers (including junior scholars) from literary studies as well as intellectual history and history of science to submit papers. Proposals for 20-minute papers (no more than 150 words), together with a short CV should be sent to seip@biblhertz.it by 31 July 2020. Please do not hesitate to get in touch with any questions.

 

Tags:  Art and Architecture  Art History  Book History  Digital Humanities  Dissection  English Literature  European literature  History  History of Medicine  History of Science  Humanism  Italian Literature  Italian Renaissance Art  Material Culture  Medicine and Science  Neo-Latin Literature  Performing Arts and Theater  Renaissance  Visual Studies 

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PLAGUES IN EARLY-MODERN EUROPE

Posted By Armando Maggi, Sunday, July 5, 2020
Updated: Sunday, July 5, 2020

This session investigates the concept/phenomenon of 'plague' in early-modern Europe also to enlighten our contemporary experience of Covid-19. Its scope is intentionally broad. We don't merely aim to collect a series of visual representations or descriptive analyses of fictional narratives concerning plagues (Decameron, etc.). Our interest lies also, and primarily, in papers that investigate the cultural, artistic, and social repercussions brought about by plagues, and also the medical reflections specifically dedicated to the symptoms and treatments of this infectious disease. How did European culture see and theorize the phenomenon of the plague in its multiple manifestations? What did 'infection' mean? What role did the plague play in the European consciousness? How did medical treatises describe the evolution of the disease in its most devastating and visible effects? Did the plagues play any role in shaping the early-modern philosophical consciousness? How did the plagues affect early-modern religious sensibility?

Interested panelists must send the following material: title, abstract (150 words) and updated C.V. no later than AUGUST 10 to Prof. Armando Maggi (amaggi@uchicago.edu).

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Tags:  art history  Baroque  bubonic plague  European history  European literature  Religious Studies  renaissance medicine 

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